7 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2021
  2. Jul 2021
  3. Jun 2021
    1. as I walk in the streets of Petersburgh, I feel a cold northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces my nerves, and fills me with delight. Do you understand this feeling? This breeze, which has travelled from the regions towards which I am advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my day dreams become more fervent and vivid. I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight. There, Margaret, the sun is for ever visible; its broad disk just skirting the horizon, and diffusing a perpetual splendour.

      A very pregnant passage that also only seems boring and uninteresting at first glance.

      First point: feelings, "nerves," emotions are highlighted and a big deal is made about their communicability ("Do you understand this feeling?").

      Next: this "scientific adventurer" is a "romantic poet"! ("Inspirited," "day dreams," "imagination," "beauty and delight.") No surprise then that a major theme of the novel is: the power of the imagination.

      Unfortunately, he is also delusional: in mid-December, the sun would not be very visible at all! Why don't more people get this? Robert Walton is well-intentioned but also kind of a nut (IMHO)!

  4. Mar 2018
    1. philter--a philter

      Etymology Italian filtro (1598 as philtro in senses 1 and 2). With sense 2 compare slightly earlier philtrum Philtrum- Etymology: < classical Latin philtrum love-potion, in post-classical Latin also groove in the upper lip below the nostrils (1587 in a British source) < ancient Greek ϕίλτρον love-charm, love-potion, charm, spell, in Hellenistic Greek also dimple in the upper lip < ϕιλ- , stem of ϕιλεῖν to love

      Definition of Philter

      1. A potion, drug, or (occasionally) charm supposed to be capable of exciting sexual attraction or love, esp. towards a particular person; a love potion. Also, more generally: any potion or drug having supposedly magical properties. Also fig. (source Oxford English Dictionary)
    2. alembics
      1. Chem. An early apparatus used for distilling, consisting of two connected vessels, a typically gourd-shaped cucurbit (cucurbit n.1 1) containing the substance to be distilled, and a receiver or flask in which the condensed product is collected. Occasionally also: spec. the lid or head (head n.1 19f) of the cucurbit together with its tube or beak which connects the two vessels. Now hist. (from Oxford English Dictionary)
  5. Feb 2014
    1. The “romantic conception of authorship” mentioned earlier as a formative trend of the rights - based theory of intellectual property is evident in the first pe rspective: t he notion that ideas are individual achievements and of indeterminate origin (not reliant on a process of building) (Fisher, 1999, Sect. II. B).
    2. Fisher points out that the rights - based, non - utilitarian theory is greatly influenced by two concepts: (1) the western ideology of property from Locke (that people are entitled to own the fruits of their labors, and should be rewarded in proportion to their contributions); and (2) the “romantic conception of authorship” of the divinely inspired individual genius or artist (1999, Sect. II. B).

      The first is the soul of the rights-based theory