3 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. Sep 2013
    1. A considerable amount of aggressiveness must bedeveloped in the child against the authority which prevents him from having his first, but none the less hismost important, satisfactions, whatever the kind of instinctual deprivation that is demanded of him may be;but he is obliged to renounce the satisfaction of this revengeful aggressiveness

      authority turns into superego external object--father conscience arises through suppression of aggressive impulse

    2. enquiries advanced from the repressed to therepressing forces

      eg what do we repress vs. what is repressing us

      Repression is another well-known defense mechanism. Repression acts to keep information out of conscious awareness. However, these memories don't just disappear; they continue to influence our behavior. For example, a person who has repressed memories of abuse suffered as a child may later have difficulty forming relationships.

      Sometimes we do this consciously by forcing the unwanted information out of our awareness, which is known as suppression. In most cases, however, this removal of anxiety-provoking memories from our awareness is believed to occur unconsciously.

      Denial is probably one of the best known defense mechanisms, used often to describe situations in which people seem unable to face reality or admit an obvious truth (i.e. "He's in denial."). Denial is an outright refusal to admit or recognize that something has occurred or is currently occurring. Drug addicts or alcoholics often deny that they have a problem, while victims of traumatic events may deny that the event ever occurred.

      Denial functions to protect the ego from things that the individual cannot cope with. While this may save us from anxiety or pain, denial also requires a substantial investment of energy. Because of this, other defenses are also used to keep these unacceptable feelings from consciousness.