27 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
  2. Nov 2020
    1. Everyone working in a TypeScript project that grows beyond a certains limit will eventually experience the situation commonly described as path hell, the snippet below is an example of such hell.
    1. Unlike some other languages, Sass doesn’t require that you use ./ for relative imports. Relative imports are always available.
    1. Since Sass implementations don't provide url rewriting, all linked assets must be relative to the output.
    2. The sass-loader uses Sass's custom importer feature to pass all queries to the Webpack resolving engine. Thus you can import your Sass modules from node_modules. Just prepend them with a ~ to tell Webpack that this is not a relative import: @import '~bootstrap';
    1. Since Sass/libsass does not provide url rewriting, all linked assets must be relative to the output. Add the missing url rewriting using the resolve-url-loader.
    2. // ~ to tell that this is not a relative import @import '~bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap'
  3. May 2020
  4. Nov 2019
    1. Much like the configuration layer, we need to specify a name for this transformation. This will help other modules negotiate their priority over the injector in relation to yours.
    1. File-relative configuration Babel loads .babelrc (and .babelrc.js / .babelrc.cjs / package.json#babel) files by searching up the directory structure starting from the "filename" being compiled (limited by the caveats below). This can be powerful because it allows you to create independent configurations for subsections of a package. File-relative configurations are also merged over top of project-wide config values, making them potentially useful for specific overrides, though that can also be accomplished through "overrides".
  5. Mar 2018
    1. That, on the other hand, is a system all by itself, and it’s rather restricted in its range. It only forms restrictive relative clauses, and then only in a narrow range of syntactic constructions. It can’t follow a preposition (the book of which I spoke rather than *the book of that I spoke) or the demonstrative that (they want that which they can’t have rather than *they want that that they can’t have), and it usually doesn’t occur after coordinating conjunctions. But it doesn’t make the same personhood distinction that who and which do, and it functions as a relative adverb sometimes. In short, the distribution of that is a subset of the distribution of the wh words. They are simply two different ways to make relative clauses, one of which is more constrained.

      One of the best explanations of why relative "that" isn't a pronoun.

  6. Oct 2015
  7. Sep 2013
    1. it is plain that the more we are under these conditions the more easily we are stirred.

      It's conditional, emotions must be gauged by the speaker and they must understand the context

    1. show that the good or the harm, the honour or disgrace, the justice or injustice, is great or small, either absolutely or relatively; and therefore it is plain that we must also have at our command propositions about greatness or smallness and the greater or the lesser -- propositions both universal and particular.

      There are degrees of goodness and justice, relativity

    1. it must adapt itself to an audience

      This seems to align more with Isocrates, that rhetoric depends on context and takes into account the audience