33 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. By nine to ten years of age, children’s sensitivity to the distinction between sarcasm and verbal irony highlights their impressive understanding of how people’s feelings are affected by others’ speech

      9-10 years old kids start to distinct between sarcasm and irony

  2. Jul 2019
    1. Children are going hungry too. Almost 14% of kids, or some 3.5 million in all, are estimated to live in poverty -- and that’s already down from a peak of more than 16% in 2012. To combat the problem, local governments around the country are opening thousands of cafeterias where children can eat for free.
  3. Jun 2019
    1. “He was genuinely afraid that the bully was serious and that it could happen,”

      Amy Simpson shared that her son is genuinely scared of the threats. A child who has already dealt with physical assault from his bully and now scared for his life. I can't even imagine the emotions the parent are going through seeing and hearing the fear from their child. As a mother, I would feel anger, sadness, fear, and even more eager to find justice for the fraction of what my child endured. As parents, we all have that defensive nature to protect our children.

  4. May 2019
    1. On September 4, 1957, the first day of classes at Central High, Governor Orval Faubus called in the Arkansas National Guard to block the black students’ entry into the high school

      So in that time black skin people can't enter the same high school as white skin people

  5. Mar 2019
    1. gender stereotypes, or thebeliefs and expectations people holdabout the typical characteristics, preferences,and behaviors of men and women. Aperson’s gender identity refers to theirpsychological sense of being male orfemale.

      I think in today's society a lot of people struggle with gender stereotypes and their identity. Society is set up to believe that the man is masculine and the women is feminine, and that if those traits are switched, then it's wrong. It's hard teaching a child about gender stereotypes because you don't want your child to feel as though he or she can not do certain things, but it happens which "may or may not" cause a crisis with their gender identity. You want the child to explore their options but in this case a lot of parents may not agree because they don't want to cause confusion. According to the article gender stereotypes, or the beliefs and expectations people hold about the typical characteristics, preferences,and behaviors of men and women. A person’s gender identity refers to their psychological sense of being male or female.

  6. Sep 2018
    1. Foreigners, like children, are among the most vulnerable groups in the population. The trafficker will often prey on these groups and deploy tactics that make their victims feel dependent on them in one way or another. 

      Traffickers prey on the weak and vulnerable. They use tactics that decrease their independence, placing the vulnerable in the middle of a vicious cycle.

  7. Aug 2018
  8. Jul 2018
    1. “I support a social transition for a kid who is in distress and needs to live in a different way. And I do so because I am very focused on what the child needs at that time,” said Johanna Olson-Kennedy, medical director of the Center for Transyouth Health and Development at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the largest transgender youth clinic in the United States with some 750 patients. A social transition to the other gender helps children learn, make friends, and participate in family activities. Some will decide later they are not transgender, but Olson-Kennedy says the potential harm in such cases may be overstated.

      This is one of the major problems in how so many approach this whole issue weather as a topic or in deciding a course of action for their own child. Furthermore the possibility of that happiness now rests on either on secrecy and passing or as is more often the case today it rests on the cooperation and orchestration of a comprehensive enough segment of the total people with whom your child is interacting to support this transition. What if we did that for gay kids. How much different would things be if tital 9 applied to all gender nonconforming kids even those who identified as gay? What if 12 states didn't have laws against speaking positively about gay as an identity in schools. What if parents where expected to do the work to insure that a self identified gay student was provided a social network for similarly identified adults and young people. And for just about any teen how might life be different emotionally speaking if we had been chemically castrated during our teen years. What if gay kids had the same wealth of support materials - public discourse etc. The reaason they don't is because we can not deal with their difference and we can not deal with it being about their sexual desire because we are unnerved by a the fact that children can identify and feel and act on sexual interests at a very young age. Gay kids know this and that is a big hurdle to comming out. I wished so much to have a boyfirend then I felt I could come out because it wouldn't mean telling my parents that I think about boys in a sexual way but I love this boy and won't deny him to anyone. No sad to say as was noted when oposition was initially raised amoung APA members over the introduction of GID to the DSM when they stated that it may just be that gay is a normal healthy worthy course of human development that as part of that process involves being in some way emotionally maimed by which they meant that there are certain painfull encounters with being different than ones own parents and most people in your community that gay people by dfinitioon must edure and untill society changes being gay is known to be a bad undesirable thing by children at a tremendously young age. So to be and develop as a person who is homosexual is not going to happen without certain paiuns and obsticles that others can easily avoid and mostly do.

  9. Feb 2018
    1. Keeping in mind that young children with developing minds watch many hours of television, and recalling how television reinforces gender stereotypes, it is not surprising when children develop stereotyped beliefs.
    2. DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDRENAs children grow and develop, they take in information and acquire knowledge at a rapid pace. As they develop their cognitive abilities, they assimilate new information and accommodate it to what they already know (Piaget, 1954). Children's ideas about how the world works come from their experiences and from the attitudes and behaviors they see around them.
  10. Sep 2017
    1. Districts of such extent as that every parent should be within a days journey of his son at school, would be desirable in cases of sickness

      In my Mortality and Morality engagement class, we often times talk about the role of family in the event that someone does become sick and how their presence can make a huge impact on how a situation is carried out. Family is often time seen as an extra layer of protection over any individual, especially for children. We assume that children are not old enough or mature enough to make major decisions for themselves, so it is ideal to keep them within reach in case of emergency. Therefore, if a school can supply resources that could be beneficial in times of need many parents would view that as a plus. - Kayla Thomas

  11. Aug 2017
  12. languagedev.wikispaces.com languagedev.wikispaces.com
    1. Young children acquire knowledge of these prosodic features as well as the spe· cific sounds used in a language through interactions wilh people in their environ-ment. Children's auditory perception of these prosodic features contributes to both !heir phonological knowledge and their subsequent somantic knowledge. Infants' perception of the speech intonation of those around them is evident when they begin lo babble aud appear lo mimic the intonation of others. Infants learn to sense when U10ir parent or caregiver is happy, excited, calm, tense, or angry from the intonation, loudness, tempo, or rhythm of the adult's speech.

      This is an example of how infants and children are very observant of their surroundings. This also shows how people can explain children in situations as a "product of their environment". Infants and children will tend to mimic and repeat the sounds and words they hear from their caregivers in places outside of their home environment.

  13. Jul 2017
    1. In early childhood, distinct types of free play are associated with high creativity. Preschoolers who spend more time in role-play (acting out characters) have higher measures of creativity: voicing someone else’s point of view helps develop their ability to analyze situations from different perspectives. When playing alone, highly creative first graders may act out strong negative emotions: they’ll be angry, hostile, anguished. The hypothesis is that play is a safe harbor to work through forbidden thoughts and emotions.In middle childhood, kids sometimes create paracosms—fantasies of entire alternative worlds. Kids revisit their paracosms repeatedly, sometimes for months, and even create languages spoken there. This type of play peaks at age 9 or 10, and it’s a very strong sign of future creativity. A Michigan State University study of MacArthur “genius award” winners found a remarkably high rate of paracosm creation in their childhoods.From fourth grade on, creativity no longer occurs in a vacuum; researching and studying become an integral part of coming up with useful solutions. But this transition isn’t easy. As school stuffs more complex information into their heads, kids get overloaded, and creativity suffers. When creative children have a supportive teacher—someone tolerant of unconventional answers, occasional disruptions, or detours of curiosity—they tend to excel. When they don’t, they tend to underperform and drop out of high school or don’t finish college at high rates.They’re quitting because they’re discouraged and bored, not because they’re dark, depressed, anxious, or neurotic. It’s a myth that creative people have these traits. (Those traits actually shut down creativity; they make people less open to experience and less interested in novelty.) Rather, creative people, for the most part, exhibit active moods and positive affect. They’re not particularly happy—contentment is a kind of complacency creative people rarely have. But they’re engaged, motivated, and open to the world.
    2. It’s also true that highly creative adults frequently grew up with hardship. Hardship by itself doesn’t lead to creativity, but it does force kids to become more flexible—and flexibility helps with creativity.
    3. Parents encouraged uniqueness, yet provided stability. They were highly responsive to kids’ needs, yet challenged kids to develop skills. This resulted in a sort of adaptability: in times of anxiousness, clear rules could reduce chaos—yet when kids were bored, they could seek change, too. In the space between anxiety and boredom was where creativity flourished.
    4. The home-game version of this means no longer encouraging kids to spring straight ahead to the right answer. When UGA’s Runco was driving through California one day with his family, his son asked why Sacramento was the state’s capital—why not San Francisco or Los Angeles? Runco turned the question back on him, encouraging him to come up with as many explanations as he could think of.Preschool children, on average, ask their parents about 100 questions a day. Why, why, why—sometimes parents just wish it’d stop. Tragically, it does stop. By middle school they’ve pretty much stopped asking. It’s no coincidence that this same time is when student motivation and engagement plummet. They didn’t stop asking questions because they lost interest: it’s the other way around. They lost interest because they stopped asking questions.
  14. Feb 2017
    1. Just as young children learn by comparison,

      I'm not picking up the meaning of this sentence. Thinking back to my younger years and different child studies, I assumed children learned by seeing, not comparison. If they are comparing, what are they comparing?

  15. Jan 2017
    1. Most vulnerable to the turmoil are children, and the community’s future rides on the decisions made for and about them.

      This is true

  16. Nov 2016
    1. It has been seen nowadays in almost all the cities and countries that internet has taken the primary positions of almost all the things for human beings. The Internet is one of the most important priorities of an individual whether he/she is a kid, a younger or an elderly. Hence, the children of today also enjoy the internet and have made the internet as the most important thing for them. Kids like to study on the internet and even parents also want their children to study through the internet as the internet has the best options available for studies.http://blog.selectmytutor.co.uk/11-educational-websites-for-primary-school-children/

  17. Sep 2016
    1. I say this despite the fact that my own work has been in much the opposite direction as Julia. Julia inherits the textual interaction of classic Matlab, SciPy and other children of the teletype — source code and command lines.

      The idea of a tradition technologies which are "children of teletype" is related to the comparison we do in the data week workshop/hackathon. In our case we talk about "unix fathers" versus "dynabook children" and bifurcation/recombination points of this technologies:

  18. May 2016
    1. kids are led to believe all the marketing and advertising on TV,

      Is it just the kids? What role do teachers, doctors, and parents play? And older siblings?

  19. Mar 2016
    1. neurotoxic chemicalscontribute to developmental delays,hyperactivity, memory loss, attentiondeficit, learning disabilities, and aggres-sive behavior.

      These are preventable. That seems to be the message. Jill Stein is well suited to a year when Flint is still a boiling cauldron.

  20. Jan 2016
    1. Here’s what the Finns, who don’t begin formal reading instruction until around age 7, have to say about preparing preschoolers to read: “The basis for the beginnings of literacy is that children have heard and listened … They have spoken and been spoken to, people have discussed [things] with them … They have asked questions and received answers.”
  21. Sep 2015
    1. Along these lines, they go on to propose the development of a “social curriculum” with programs and activities that “enhance social inclusion and connection.” For ideas and techniques to make that happen, please see Greater Good’s education channel!
  22. Aug 2015
  23. Oct 2013
    1. Some have thought that boys, as long as they are under seven years of age, should not be set to learn, because that is the earliest age that can understand what is taught, and endure the labor of learning.

      I support and do not support this statement at the same time. I think many seven year olds are still trying to understand the world in their own way. It depends on what is being taught and how it is being taught. Before you poop your pampers, read/listen to Ken Robinson. I agree with much of what he has to say on the state of learning in children.

    2. It is incredible how much retardation is caused to reading by haste; for hence arise hesitation, interruption, and repetition, as children attempt more than they can manage; and then, after making mistakes, they become distrustful even of what they know

      Interesting

    3. 33

      We learn by being surrounded by words, sounds, images. Learn through immersion and association as well as mistake

    4. , as the elements of learning depend on the memory alone, which not only exists in children, but is at that time of life even most tenacious

      This sounds like modern psychology, particularly of children's plasticity when young

  24. Sep 2013
    1. The phrases "possession of good children" and "of many children" bear a quite clear meaning.

      What is there to do to for people with bad or ugly children, just be unhappy?