35 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh}. {2021-03-04] there will be many a wrong analysis as we cycle through the 1 year anniversary and there is nothing to mark this one out as uniquely bad, but what does seem surprising to me in hindsight is the confidence with which people pronounced given that this was a new disease.[Tweet}, Twitter. Retrieved from: twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1367531205198049285

    1. If no manufacturer guidance is available, preliminary data(19, 20) suggests limiting the number of reuses to no more than five uses per device to ensure an adequate safety margin.
    2. Extended use is favored over reuse because it is expected to involve less touching of the respirator and therefore less risk of contact transmission.
    1. As Karan pointed out to us, the fact that some people refuse to wear masks makes it even more imperative that we distribute higher-grade masks to those willing to wear them.

      Abraar Karan on coronavirus masks

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Charlie Warzel and Zeynep Tufekci</span> in Opinion | It’s Been 10 Months, and I Still Don’t Know When to Replace My Mask! - The New York Times (<time class='dt-published'>03/02/2021 04:23:02</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Fit is very important for upping one’s mask game.

      Mask fit is important for helping to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

    2. If I were wearing an N95 just for the weekly grocery store run, I’d probably be fine with alternating two carefully handled masks for many months as long as the elastic works and there’s no soiling. That’s not a lot of use! But if I were wearing one all day, every workday, I’d consider having one for each day and replacing them maybe every month. So that’s about five per month. Could one be really careful and make that two months? Probably.

      Guidance on how long masks could potentially be worn and used/reused.

    3. I will give a modified version of what health care workers were advised during the worst of the shortages. Rotating a few is enough for disinfection. Just let them rest for a few days in a non-airtight container (like a paper bag or a Tupperware container with holes) and replace one only when it no longer fits well or the elastics have gone soft, or if it is soiled. It’s also good to use hand-sanitizer before putting them on and taking them off. Handle them gently, because a good fit is essential to getting the most out of it. My sense from having heard a lot from people using all the other disinfection methods, like heat, is that they just increase the risk of damaging the mask.

      They've definitely buried the lede here, but this is the answer everyone will be looking for.

    4. It’s Been 10 Months, and I Still Don’t Know When to Replace My Mask!

      It is a horrific public health problem that this is a headline nearly a year later.

  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. Wearing masks and taking other precautions while attending church and other public forums is for the benefit of our neighbor. We wear masks not out of fear, but out of love. Our actions literally communicate “I don’t like wearing this mask, but I do it for you because you are my brother and my sister.” Taking these steps are true acts of benevolence, as we are making sacrifices for the health and well-being of others.
  4. Dec 2020
    1. For safety reasons, certain pumps and sprayers cannot be returned to the store if opened.

      More likely: they don't want to deal with these returns because of risk to store and because they want to keep the money they made from the sale.

  5. Sep 2020
    1. Take away: Though not a guarantee of health, wearing masks reduces the number of respiratory infections compared to no/inconsistent mask wearing.

      The claim: Masks are protective against clinical respiratory illness.

      The evidence: The authors performed a meta-analysis of random controlled trials and observational studies examining mask use in health care workers. The results showed that wearing masks resulted in fewer infections compared to people without masks. These results agree with other publications (1, 2). One pre-print article which performed meta-analysis showed inconclusive results concerning the effectiveness of masks (3). Based on these meta-analyses, mask wearing results in fewer respiratory infections, though it will not prevent all infections when used as the sole protective measure.

      Sources:

      1) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32497510/

      2) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27632416/

      3) https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.30.20047217v2

  6. Aug 2020
  7. Jul 2020
  8. Jun 2020
    1. CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

      It sounds like it's recommended because a significant portion of people with coronavirus are asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic, and the virus can spread through speaking, coughing or sneezing.

    1. we wear cloth face masks because they protect other people from getting COVID-19 from us, in case we have it and don’t know.

      There's no "proof" that these work, but there's a hope that it helps along with hand washing and a distance of six feet.

  9. Mar 2019
    1. Masks

      Interesting that he uses this quote to begin his monograph as physical masks have been linked to hooliganism. Young boys and men are more likely to wear a mask at Halloween than girls and most of their costumes are designed that way. I think this article that looks at the power of masks, both with in a theatre context and online context is useful. The idea that a mask can transform the wearer into something else, potentially violent, also happens online is frightening. https://aeon.co/essays/how-masks-explain-the-psychology-behind-online-harassment

  10. Jul 2017
    1. Because it is so important to be seen as competent and productive members of society, people naturally attempt to present themselves to others in a positive light. We attempt to convince others that we are good and worthy people by appearing attractive, strong, intelligent, and likable and by saying positive things to others (Jones & Pittman, 1982; Schlenker, 2003). The tendency to present a positive self-image to others, with the goal of increasing our social status, is known as self-presentation, and it is a basic and natural part of everyday life.

      A short film captures how social interactions influence our complex relationships between self-presentation, self-esteem and self concept in a unique way.