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  1. Mar 2021
    1. 2021-03-28

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, March 28). RT @GosiaGasperoPhD: This below is a measured fact (not a model): In Alberta B117 cases are doubling every 7.5 days @jkenney @shandro cc:… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1376441913268649989

    3. This below is a measured fact (not a model): In Alberta B117 cases are doubling every 7.5 days @jkenney @shandro cc:@CMOH_Alberta It's like a speedometer showing that you are speeding @ 200 km/h 1/
    1. 2021-03-21

    2. Fischer, H., Said, N., & Huff, M. (2021). Insight into the accuracy of COVID-19 beliefs predicts behavior during the pandemic. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/x2qv3

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/x2qv3
    4. Susceptibility to COVID-19 misinformation--believing false statements to be true--negatively relates to compliance with public health measures. Here, we make the prediction that metacognitive insight into the varying accuracy of own beliefs predicts compliance with recommended health behaviors, above and beyond the accuracy of these beliefs. In a national sample of German citizens, we investigate metacognitive sensitivity, the degree to which confidence differentiates correct from incorrect beliefs. Bayesian and frequentist analyses show that citizens with higher metacognitive sensitivity were more likely to adopt recommended public health measures. Importantly, this benefit of metacognitive introspection into own beliefs held controlling for the accuracy of the beliefs. The present research highlights that insight into the varying accuracy of beliefs, rather than only the beliefs themselves, relate to citizens’ behavior during the pandemic
    5. Insight into the accuracy of COVID-19 beliefs predicts behavior during the pandemic
    1. 2021-03-18

    2. Hein, G., Gamer, M., Gall, D., Gründahl, M., Domschke, K., Andreatta, M., Wieser, M. J., & Pauli, P. (2021). Social cognitive factors outweigh negative emotionality in predicting COVID-19 related safety behaviors. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/5sbzy

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/5sbzy
    4. Objective: Emotion-motivation models propose that behaviors, including compliance with safety behaviors, should be predicted by the same variables that also predict negative affect since emotional reactions should induce a motivation to avoid threatening situations. In contrast, social cognitive models propose that safety behaviors are predicted by a different set of variables that mainly reflect cognitive and socio-structural aspects. Methods: Here, we directly tested these opposing hypotheses in young adults (N = 4,134) in the context of COVID-19-related safety behaviors to prevent infections. In each participant, we collected measures of negative affect as well as cognitive and socio-structural variables during the lockdown in the first infection wave in Germany. Results: We found a negative effect of the pandemic on emotional responses. However, this was not the main predictor for young adults’ willingness to comply with COVID-19- related safety measures. Instead, individual differences in compliance were mainly predicted by cognitive and socio-structural variables. These results were confirmed in an independent data set. Conclusions: This study shows that individuals scoring high on negative affect during the pandemic are not necessarily more likely to comply with safety regulations. Instead, political measures should focus on cognitive interventions and the societal relevance of the health issue. These findings provide important insights into the basis of health-related concerns and feelings as well as behavioral adaptations.
    5. Social cognitive factors outweigh negative emotionality in predicting COVID-19 related safety behaviors
    1. 2021-03-19

    2. Corker, K. S. (2021). An Open Science Workflow for More Credible, Rigorous Research. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/wu6sn

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/wu6sn
    4. Part of what distinguishes science from other ways of knowing is that scientists show their work. Yet when probed, it turns out that much of the process of research is hidden away: in personal files, in undocumented conversations, in point-and-click menus, and so on. In recent years, a movement towards more open science has arisen in psychology. Open science practices capture a broad swath of activities designed to take parts of the research process that were previously known only to a research team and make them more broadly accessible (e.g., open data, open analysis code, pre-registration, open research materials). Such practices increase the value of research by increasing transparency, which may in turn facilitate higher research quality. Plus, open science practices are now required at many journals. This chapter will introduce open science practices and provide plentiful resources for researchers seeking to integrate these practices into their workflow.
    5. An Open Science Workflow for More Credible, Rigorous Research
    1. 2020-03-03

    2. Wang, C. J., Ng, C. Y., & Brook, R. H. (2020). Response to COVID-19 in Taiwan: Big Data Analytics, New Technology, and Proactive Testing. JAMA, 323(14), 1341. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.3151

    3. 10.1001/jama.2020.3151
    4. Taiwan is 81 miles off the coast of mainland China and was expected to have the second highest number of cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to its proximity to and number of flights between China.1 The country has 23 million citizens of which 850 000 reside in and 404 000 work in China.2,3 In 2019, 2.71 million visitors from the mainland traveled to Taiwan.4 As such, Taiwan has been on constant alert and ready to act on epidemics arising from China ever since the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003. Given the continual spread of COVID-19 around the world, understanding the action items that were implemented quickly in Taiwan and assessing the effectiveness of these actions in preventing a large-scale epidemic may be instructive for other countries.
    5. Response to COVID-19 in Taiwan
    1. 2021-03-24

    2. Adam Kucharski. (2021, March 24). This is an interesting perspective on Taiwan (& glad it mentions data/privacy), although I’d like to see more references to what local officials were actually saying about approach in real-time, rather than what UK-based researchers later say it was: Https://t.co/FDu0mQoISh 1/ [Tweet]. @AdamJKucharski. https://twitter.com/AdamJKucharski/status/1374638777814167555

    3. Another useful perspective on response in Taiwan (from March 2020): https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2762689… 4/4
    4. Taiwan has implemented several innovative, effective measures against COVID-19, but it will harm our ability to plan for the next pandemic if we don't look fully at how countries were interpreting - and acting on - available evidence in real-time. 3/
    5. E.g. from April 2020: "Covid-19 is becoming flu-like. It means that since it is highly contagious with many mild or asymptomatic cases, and can be transmitted through droplets and contaminated areas, we won’t get rid of this virus totally." https://telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/taiwans-vice-president-chen-chien-jen-countrys-fight-covid-19/… 2/
    6. This is an interesting perspective on Taiwan (& glad it mentions data/privacy), although I'd like to see more references to what local officials were actually saying about approach in real-time, rather than what UK-based researchers later say it was: https://theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/24/how-taiwan-triumphed-over-covid-as-uk-faltered… 1/
    1. 2021-03-16

    2. Lopez-Persem, A., Bieth, T., Guiet, S., Ovando-Tellez, M., & Volle, E. (2021). Through thick and thin: Changes in creativity during the first lockdown of the Covid-19 pandemic. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/26qde

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/26qde
    4. COVID-19 took us by surprise. We all had to face a new situation never encountered before and find new solutions to the problems it generated, either related to the disease or the lockdown's consequences. The lockdown and pandemic crisis caused new issues and placed us in an entirely new context, changing our way of life, work time and conditions, and habits. Coping with such an unprecedented situation may have stimulated creativity. However, the situation also restricted our liberties and wellbeing and triggered health or psychological difficulties. Worrying, concerns, challenging conditions of confinement may have hampered creativity or its expression. Hence, wellbeing factors related to affective experience, living conditions, social interactions, as well as workload or available free time, may have impacted creativity during the lockdown. We carried out an online survey based on a self-administered questionnaire to examine whether the first lockdown period related to the COVID-19 pandemic (spring 2020) was associated with creativity changes and explore the role of several factors in these changes.
    5. Through thick and thin: changes in creativity during the first lockdown of the Covid-19 pandemic.
    1. 2021-03-18

    2. Ryan, W., Baum, S., & Evers, E. (2021). People Behave as if they Anticipate Regret Conditional on Experiencing a Bad Outcome. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dcgpy

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/dcgpy
    4. Decision-makers often must decide whether to invest in prospects to reduce risk or instead save scarce resources. Existing models of risky decision making assume that decision-makers consider the absolute improvement in probabilistic chances (e.g., increasing a 10% chance of winning $10 to a 20% chance is roughly similar to increasing an 80% chance of winning $10 to a 90% chance). We present evidence that people instead behave as if they consider the relative reduction in bad outcomes (increasing a 10% chance to a 20% chance eliminates 1/9th of all bad outcomes, while increasing an 80% chance to a 90% chance eliminates 1/2 of all bad outcomes). This bias in the anticipation of preventable bad outcomes drives risk preferences that violate normative standards and results in the same participants behaving both risk-seeking and risk-averse within the same decision-making task. We discuss how regret theory can be adjusted to accommodate these results.
    5. People Behave as if they Anticipate Regret Conditional on Experiencing a Bad Outcome
    1. 2021-03-18

    2. Stefan Simanowitz. (2021, March 18). 1/. The PM claims that the govt “stuck to the science like glue” But this is not true At crucial times they ignored the science or concocted pseudo-scientific justifications for their actions & inaction This thread, & the embedded threads, set them out https://t.co/dhXqkSL1bz [Tweet]. @StefSimanowitz. https://twitter.com/StefSimanowitz/status/1372460227619135493

    3. 9/. The govt claim that they put “a protective ring “around care homes This is not true On 2 April, despite knowing about asymptomatic spread, the govt sent discharge guidance to hospitals to transfer patients to care homes without testing I found the smoking gun on 13 May
    4. 8/. The govt repeatedly claim they didn’t know about ASYMPTOMATIC SPREAD This is not true The govt knew asymptomatic transmission of #COVID19 was likely in Jan & had this confirmed in Feb So why did the govt direct hospitals to transfer people to care homes without testing?
    5. 7/. Whilst the concept of #HerdImmunity is perfectly scientific, any virologist or epidemiologist will tell you - & must’ve told the govt - that herd immunity is an OUTCOME, never a STRATEGY Allowing #COVID19 to spread without a vaccine would be madness & result in mass deaths
    6. 6/. “Lockdown fatigue” was used as an way of kickstarting another central piece of cod science The HERD IMMUNITY STRATEGY It was Dr Halpern - whose PhD is in political science - who first floated the concept of #HerdImmunity to @BBCMarkEaston on 11/3/20.
    7. 5/ The Nudge Unit told BBC’s @lewis_goodall the concept didn’t come from them The crucial questions therefore are: 1) Where did this idea of lockdown/behavioural fatigue come? 2) How did it gain such prominence in govt strategy & in the media narrative?
    8. 4/. When questioned on 9/6 whether the idea of #LockdownFatigue had come from him & @B_I_Tweets, #DavidHalpern couldn't remember “It did not, in my memory, come from SPI-B or us", he said, his eyes darting Strangely, @uksciencechief also can’t remember where the idea came from
    9. 3/. The concept of "lockdown fatigue" had no basis in behavioural science On 14 March, 700 behavioural scientists published an open letter stating this So where had the idea come from? How had it been allowed to shape govt policy at this crucial time?
    10. 2/. “BEHAVIOURAL FATIGUE” A key justification for delaying lockdown was that “if we do it too early people will get bored” The paper-thin reasoning of this claim was apparent at the time But it was repeated by the PM, Ministers, @uksciencechief & Whitty
    11. 1/. The PM claims that the govt “stuck to the science like glue” But this is not true At crucial times they ignored the science or concocted pseudo-scientific justifications for their actions & inaction This thread, & the embedded threads, set them out
    1. 2020-08-26

    2. Amy Maxmen, PhD. (2020, August 26). 🙄The CDC’s only substantial communication with the public in the pandemic is through its MMW Reports. But the irrelevant & erroneous 1st line of this latest report suggests political meddling to me. (The WHO doesn’t declare pandemics. They declare PHEICs, which they did Jan 30) https://t.co/Y1NlHbQIYQ [Tweet]. @amymaxmen. https://twitter.com/amymaxmen/status/1298660729080356864

    3. The CDC's only substantial communication with the public in the pandemic is through its MMW Reports. But the irrelevant & erroneous 1st line of this latest report suggests political meddling to me. (The WHO doesn't declare pandemics. They declare PHEICs, which they did Jan 30)
    1. COVID-19 Living Evidence. (2020, October 23). Weekly update of COAP As of 23.10.2020, we have indexed 80588 publications: 8902 pre-prints 71686 peer-reviewed publications Pre-prints: BioRxiv, MedRxiv Peer-reviewed: PubMed, EMBASE https://t.co/RaDy1Wm4Hq https://t.co/FYRaYPe8oG [Tweet]. @evidencelive. https://twitter.com/evidencelive/status/1319578431848353793

    2. Weekly update of COAP As of 23.10.2020, we have indexed 80588 publications: *8902 pre-prints *71686 peer-reviewed publications Pre-prints: BioRxiv, MedRxiv Peer-reviewed: PubMed, EMBASE
    1. Wang, P., Nair, M. S., Liu, L., Iketani, S., Luo, Y., Guo, Y., Wang, M., Yu, J., Zhang, B., Kwong, P. D., Graham, B. S., Mascola, J. R., Chang, J. Y., Yin, M. T., Sobieszczyk, M., Kyratsous, C. A., Shapiro, L., Sheng, Z., Huang, Y., & Ho, D. D. (2021). Antibody Resistance of SARS-CoV-2 Variants B.1.351 and B.1.1.7. Nature, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03398-2

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 3). As debate on ‘saving the economy versus saving lives’ marches on, it’s worth noting that this type of contrast actually has a name in fallacy research: Https://t.co/N8U4ABWTuh it’s also worth noting that there is now a substantial number of research articles on the topic. 1/n [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1323603017179013130

    2. as debate on "saving the economy versus saving lives" marches on, it's worth noting that this type of contrast actually has a name in fallacy research: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_dilemma… it's also worth noting that there is now a substantial number of research articles on the topic. 1/n
    3. preprint analysing US specifically https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3655899
    4. analysis highlighting the important moderating role of both timing of restrictions and the nature of a country's economic activity
    5. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32835011/ published paperfinds both negative direct effects of social distancing measures and indirect positive effects (via reduction in case numbers) on stock market returns
    6. and one might add the evidence on the 'reverse causal direction' of economic inequality => COVID deaths
    7. the studies by Chetty et al. using real-time economic tracking to study the mechanisms by which C-19 affects the economy
    1. David R Tomlinson 💙. (2021, March 5). Truth. 💙 @FreshAirNHS @theRCN @TheBMA @mancunianmedic @DrLindaDykes @Chakladar_A @KGadhok https://t.co/Ke2C84KuaT https://t.co/C469qvrSoK [Tweet]. @DRTomlinsonEP. https://twitter.com/DRTomlinsonEP/status/1367962251211202566

    2. But the whole document is genius: “It takes more than a convenient ‘re-interpretation’ by PHE to overturn a definition that has been the law of the land for thirty years and make something that is not PPE into PPE.” @PHE_uk @NHSEngland @KamranAbbasi @fgodlee
    3. Truth. @FreshAirNHS @theRCN @TheBMA @mancunianmedic @DrLindaDykes @Chakladar_A @KGadhok https://tridenthse.co.uk/covid-report.pdf
    4. Evidence will be presented that: • the relevant Government departments (PHE/DHSC) are seriously misleading healthcare workers by referring to surgical masks as ‘PPE’,
    5. the HSE provides advice specifically for HCWs: “Until the cause & route of transmission are known, in addition to standard precautions, infection control measures for inpatients should include...airborne precautions, e.g. use of FFP3 filtering masks for persons entering the room”
    1. 1. LONG THREAD ON COVID, LOCKDOWN & THE ROADMAP: TLDR: There’s a lot to like about the roadmap – but it could be & should be made much more effective. Because this will be tying current situation to the roadmap, I’m concentrating on English data Read on… (22 tweets - sorry)
    1. The story continues - after @ikashnitsky and I pointed out that this paper was mathematically impossible, and had numerous errors, it was partially corrected Now, the lead author is calling us "trolls"
    1. What can NGOs, government and public institutions do on TikTok? Today @melisfiganmese and I shared some insights at #EuroPCom, the @EU_CoR conference for public communication. We were asked to talk about upcoming social media trends. Here's a thread with some insights
    1. We get a lot of questions, and thought more people might benefit from seeing the answers! We’ll start sharing paraphrased Q&As in this thread. #COVIDCorpsFAQ
    1. New @PEI_Germany report provides much needed clarity to the #AstraZeneca "pause" in Germany. Not yet available in English. I will try to summarize. /thread https://pei.de/SharedDocs/Downloads/DE/newsroom/meldungen/faq-temporaere-aussetzung-astrazeneca.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=2
    1. “I'm not here to give you the outcome of any scientific review”, says EMA director Emer Cooke at start of press conference on AstraZeneca vaccine safety. "I'm here to explain the steps in the process, what we're doing, and when you can expect us to come to a conclusion."
    1. It seems appropriate to do a thread on our recent session about the use of Twitter by statisticians.
    1. Re-opening live events and large venues after Covid-19 'lockdown': Behavioural risks and their mitigations
    1. Worrying misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines is being circulated in Whatsapp groups. Doctors @vanessa_apea & @crageshri from @NHSBartsHealth discuss some of these myths & tell us the facts on #aidsmapLIVE.
    1. I wish all these déjà vu reports of "disappearing antibodies" would disappear. That is not a problem. https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2020/10/20/two-studies-show-covid-19-antibodies-persist-for-months/… by @NIHDirector https://nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2026116… @NEJM
    1. Why did a German newspaper insist the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine was inefficacious for older people—without evidence? @hristio reports:
    1. Update: A common question I received was why I didn't include vulnerable individuals under age 45. First, including them doesn't change the shape of the curve Also, just 2% of COVID-19 deaths came from those under 45. And only 4% of all deaths under 45 involve COVID-19.
    2. If you follow my work, you know that the truth is usually somewhere in the middle. And right now, we are still doing a poor job of finding common ground. Thank you to all the experts & scientists who are cutting through politics and advocating for realistic, data-driven goals.
    3. We have a former president who said Covid is already over & a current president who says it won't be normal until Christmas. Because our country is so polarized, this leads to people gravitating towards either extreme. Narratives then become driven by politics, not science.
    4. Yesterday, one state outlined a clear goal for when the mask mandate will be lifted: 8 weeks after 1.6M first doses have been allocated, enough for 70% of the eligible population. I hope other states can also be transparent about their exit strategies.
    5. If we want people to continue to take precautions as restrictions are eased, we should set a common goal to work towards. A messaging such as "you must continue to social distance and wear a mask indefinitely, even if you get vaccinated" will only fuel vaccine hesitancy.
    6. To conclude, it's important that we return to normal in a safe and responsible manner. Currently, the data suggests that we'll be able to do that by this summer.
    7. By summer, everybody who wants a vaccine will be able to get one. The vulnerable population will long have been able to receive their shots. Hospitalizations & deaths will be at negligible levels. Normality will happen... with or without herd immunity.
    8. It's interesting to see so many "but long Covid!" replies, yet not a single one of them gave any guidelines or metrics about when things should go back to normal in their alternate approach. I'm guessing those are the same individuals who have the liberty to work from home.
    9. Being kind isn't just about telling people to stay home. Being kind is about sending kids to school so they can get a proper education. Being kind is also about telling people that it's safe for their children to hug & kiss their grandparents if they've been fully vaccinated.
    10. When can we return to normal? Forget about "herd immunity". Below is my estimate for the number of susceptible individuals over time, as a proportion of the US population. Looking at this graph, what is the best point to go back to normal? Christmas? Fall? Or Summer?
    11. Our country currently has no concrete guidelines for when to expect a return to normal. We seem to be more concerned about a theoretical threshold than setting realistic goals about when restrictions can be dropped. Meanwhile, UK just announced theirs:
    1. At an @improvingpsych meeting with @PsychRabble and @NeilLewisJr a group of people discussed a special article format: A core dialogue - two sides discuss the core of their disagreement, and propose how we could move towards a resolution in the future. Still love the idea!
    2. Too often, scientific debates are like these two mascots. Two parties do their little dance to show off, and walk away, leaving no one wiser about how a disagreement should be resolved.
    3. This piece makes a great point about how we can try to make commentaries more useful for science - turning them from 'pointless quibbles' into pieces where both parties actually commit to working out their disagreements.
    1. @STWorg and @BaerbelW@JoshCompton2011 @WlliamCrozierIV @SeifertColleen @d_j_flynn @M_B_Petersen @tinaeliassi @UlliEcker @BrendanNyhan @JaneSuit @DanLarhammar @mariabaghramian @PieroBianucci @a_b_powell @FullFact @ProfDFreeman @andrew_chadwick @ipanalysis @SineadPLambe @SJVanders @mariejuanchich
    2. @STWorg and @BaerbelW@profrapp @roozenbot @PhilippMSchmid @GaleSinatra @emilythorson @ekvraga @LeticiaBode @lkfazio @JasonReifler @philipplenz6 @jayvanbavel @AndyPerfors @MicahGoldwater @M_B_Petersen @Karen_Douglas @CorneliaBetsch @ira_hyman @lingtax @annaklas_ @andyguess @DerynStrange
    3. @STWorg and @BaerbelW@olbeun @SciBeh @lombardi_learn @kostas_exarhia @stefanmherzog @commscholar @johnfocook @Briony_Swire @Sander_vdLinden @DG_Rand @kendeou @dlholf @ProfSunitaSah @HendirkB @gordpennycook @adamhfinn @emmapsychology @ThomsonAngus @UMDCollegeofEd @gavaruzzi @katytapper @julieleask
    4. But why stop at German? We also have a Spanish translation: "Manual de Comunicación Para la Vacuna Contra el COVID-19" available at https://sks.to/C19Vax-es Yet another @BaerbelW Incorporated accomplishment. And yes, another translation due tomorrow... stand by to learn more...
    1. Herd immunity is the end goal of developing a vaccine, @thehowie explains. But when government officials talk about relying on “herd immunity” as a strategy for slowing or stopping the Covid-19 pandemic without a vaccine, it’s a more dangerous approach.
    1. Today @annelongfield gives her last speech as Children’s Commissioner for England. Here’s a preview:
    1. University Students' Adherence to the COVID-19-guidelines: A Qualitative Study on Facilitators and Barriers
    1. Trying to appease both public health demands and the libertarian views of the free market has led not only to astronomical death tolls, such as in the US, UK, and Brazil, but to flailing economies.
    2. governments willing to take the political and economic hit of harsh restrictions early in 2020 are now benefiting from freedom from population restrictions, and in the case of South Korea and China, flourishing economies.
    3. Halfway compromises do not work in response to pandemics and have just dragged out the pandemic for all. Frustratingly, for those of us who research the politics of global health security, this was entirely foreseen.
    1. 3.7 million infected with #COVID19 in the UK. An estimated 5-10% will develop #LongCovid. We can't afford to ignore this unfolding health crisis. Join us, 1.30pm. With @theAliceRoberts @chrischirp + guest experts @Dr2NisreenAlwan @drsarah_e
    1. Having been working with the UK regulator as an advisor for several months I have refrained from commenting on specific vaccines but this is good news so far. However, we remain vigilant!
    1. How to perform Robust Bayesian Meta-Analysis in JASP. To learn more, have a look at the tutorial video: https://bit.ly/37ENOPL as well as the tutorial paper: https://bit.ly/2Hm7flq
    1. Competence within sports science, and biases towards insider methods seemed to play key roles in this case. We argue that these features may play a more general role in the persistence of poor methods, expanding claims from Akerlof et al. 3
    2. We look at a case study - the use of MBI in sports science. Incoherent statistical methods have persisted for over a decade, despite criticism by statisticians. Draws on work by amazing sports journalist @cragcrest and statistician @KristinSainani 2
    3. Using agent-based methods we show how even modest contact between disciplines can allow better methods to spread. This is because outsiders can award academic credit to those using good methods, leading to their uptake. 5
    4. We build both analytic and agent based models to explore how these features might prevent the adoption of better methods. But wait, are scientific disciplines with poor methods doomed? 4
    5. We find this result is robust across many conditions, and discuss what it might mean for the set-up of real scientific disciplines. 6
    6. New paper!!! @psmaldino look at what causes the persistence of poor methods in science, even when better methods are available. And we argue that interdisciplinary contact can lead better methods to spread. 1
    1. "Halfway compromises do not work in response to pandemics and have just dragged out the pandemic for all. Frustratingly, for those of us who research the politics of global health security, this was entirely foreseen."
    2. "Trying to appease both public health demands and the libertarian views of the free market has led not only to astronomical death tolls, such as in the US, UK, and Brazil, but to flailing economies. "
    3. "governments willing to take the political and economic hit of harsh restrictions early in 2020 are now benefiting from freedom from population restrictions, and in the case of South Korea and China, flourishing economies." Independent panel report: 1/3
    1. important themes that emerged in discussion: accuracy, trust, transparency and bias in AI support tools for policy (more on this in the "Tools" session tomorrow) as well as the benefits (and perils) of coproduction between policy makers and researchers..
    2. Session 2: the policy interface followed with a really helpful presentation by Lindsey Pike, from Bristol, and then panel discussion with Mirjam Jenny (Robert Koch Insitute), Paulina Lang (UK Cabinet Office), Rachel McCloy (Reading Uni.), and Rene van Bavel (European Commission)
    3. ..and possible tensions between close science-policy links, on the one hand, and science-general public trust issues on the other. Discussion will continue via our Reddits: https://reddit.com/r/BehSciAsk/comments/jkzuig/ideas_for_discussion_how_can_research_interface/… and #scibeh2020
    4. videos and summary docs will be posted online to help those who missed the session get up to speed join us now for hackathon sessions (underway), and tomorrow, Day 2
    5. @STWorg @stefanmherzog
    1. This graph shows the share of the Swedish population testing positive to antibodies against covid week on week. The results are pretty startling.
    1. You can always see the latest SocArXiv papers on COVID-19 topics here: https://bit.ly/2XNVF7b. You can comment using the @hypothes_is tool, and endorse using the @PlauditPub button. And add your own work, using the covid-19 tag.
    1. Bah, higher than in *unvaccinated* population.
    2. A reminder: especially among the elderly, some individuals will die shortly after receipt of the vaccine. What we need to understand is the background rate of such deaths. Are they higher then in the vaccinated population? We didn't see that in the trials. Some data from @RtAVM.
    1. #LongCovid prevalence in a study of 1,733 hospitalised patients in Wuhan at average follow-up of 6 months: 76% at least one ongoing symptom 63% fatigue or muscle weakness 26% sleep problems 23% anxiety/depression 9% palpitations 9% joint pain 5% chest pain https://thelancet.com/action/showFullTableHTML?isHtml=true&tableId=tbl2&pii=S0140-6736%2820%2932656-8
    1. am retweeting this with reminder of an alternative opinion expressing concern about flooding ICUs beyond capacity with young people if relaxations are lifted too soon https://spiegel.de/international/germany/interview-with-virologist-christian-drosten-i-am-quite-apprehensive-about-what-might-otherwise-happen-in-spring-and-summer-a-f22c0495-5257-426e-bddc-c6082d6434d5
    1. An informed community is a healthier community. Check us out at @UCLACOVID19 and @uclaaasc's http://translatecovid.org for reliable multilingual COVID-19 information. #covid19 #healthliteracy #healthmatters #publichealth #multilingual #healthliteracymonth #IHA @UCLAFSPH @uclaaasc
    1. I’ve turned down a lot of COVID-related interviews/events this year because topic was outside my main expertise and/or I thought there were others who were better placed to comment. Science communication isn’t just about what you take part in – it’s also about what you decline.
    1. Israel: 2.4M after 1st dose (27% pop) 78% of all 60+ years old Despite that, we have a problem: cities of lower socio-economic status and more cases get vaccinated less X: Socioeconomic rank Y: % 60+ years old vaccinated Color: Vaccination need ratio @MDCaspi by covid-19 cases
    1. Every so often I am reminded that there is an entire universe of people just casually giving out gazillions of wrong answers on researchgate like it's no big deal, and it's wild.
    1. Excellent new Covid RED dashboard from UCL https://covid.i-sense.org.uk Would be good to also know (a) how many contacts isolate (b) how many would not have done so anyway (c) how many actually infected. All necessary for T+T to be effective - need this info!
    1. We need to start learning now how best to ‘nudge’ people to receive their vaccinations.
    1. Resistance to COVID-19 vaccination has increased in Ireland and the UK during the pandemic
    1. Our great team works over the clock to make this data accurate and insightful demonstrating how important it is to have MDs, Data-scientists, Healthcare policy experts working together in harmony. @ShinaAvi @GilCaspi1 @AvshalomDayan @EshalYael @SigalTaub https://vaccinations.covid19maps.org
    2. Leadership. One of the most important and non-trivial steps taken by @JoeBiden is the decision to prioritize the protection of those at the highest risk. In Israel, our analysis shows that municipalities at low SES have the lowest rates of vaccination of at-risk populations.1/4
    3. Our novel metric - Vaccination Need Ratio (VNR) assesses the disease burden in a municipality relative to the level of 60+ pop. vaccinated. While the pandemic reaches calamitous scales, policymakers should target those red pockets of high VNR to effectively restrain it. 2/4
    4. These are not the low hanging fruits. For that, we do need leadership worldwide, prioritization of equality, and real national responsibility for healthcare. Boosting vaccine accessibility should be coupled with public education, info, and transparency. @EricTopol 3/4