30 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I strongly prefer this over Carcassonne. It plays faster (I don't want a tile laying game to go for more than 30 mins or so) and I happen to like the limited options. Carcassonne just gets on my nerves because I just don't view selecting between so many placement options to be that interesting. Obviously, YMMV. Ditto the previous statement, it's different than Carcassonne. And that's why I like it.
  2. Apr 2021
    1. I must say I am quite surprised by so many negative reviews. To me this little game is pure genius. There's something about it you just can't put your finger on... something strange, hard to define. The premise is utterly simple - roll left or right - but the game keeps adding new possibilities every level. And it doesn't make a fuzz about it. "Here's something completely new, it's there, who cares". The mechanics and physics are spot on and the game explores them brilliantly. Visually it's beautiful and the characters you interact with are strange and fascinating. A feeling of novelty and discovery permeates the game from start to finish.Here's my suggestion: watch some videos of the gameplay and see if it bothers you. If not, go for it, for you've barely seen the tip of the iceberg.
  3. Mar 2021
    1. This is gonna be an uphill slog and I'm really excited for it. If you know that's what you're getting into (a long slow grind on puzzles that may not fit well together), this could be great - especially if you're invested in both the work and the community (posting on here helps loads with games like this!) Your mileage may vary!
    1. As to why both is_a? and kind_of? exist: I suppose it's part of Ruby's design philosophy. Python would say there should only be one way to do something; Ruby often has synonymous methods so you can use the one that sounds better. It's a matter of preference.
    1. Again, this is all opinion-based, and due to the sheer number of developers who rely on this technology as their bread and butter, sub-communities and religiousness forms around patterns, anti-patterns, practices, de-facto standards, micro-packages, polyfills, frameworks, build-tools, etc.
    2. For instance, those who prefer classical inheritance may enjoy the addition of the class keyword, while others may reject it as conflicting with the idea of a prototypical inheritance model.
    3. JavaScript, as a language, has some fundamental shortcomings — I think the majority of us agree on that much. But everyone has a different opinion on what precisely the shortcomings are.
    1. Mike Caulfield. (2021, March 10). One of the drivers of Twitter daily topics is that topics must be participatory to trend, which means one must be able to form a firm opinion on a given subject in the absence of previous knowledge. And, it turns out, this is a bit of a flaw. [Tweet]. @holden. https://twitter.com/holden/status/1369551099489779714

  4. Feb 2021
  5. Nov 2020
    1. About auto-close bots... I can appreciate the need for issue grooming, but surely there must a better way about it than letting an issue or PR's fate be semi-permanently decided and auto-closed by an unknowing bot. Should I be periodically pushing up no-op commits or adding useless "bump" comments in order to keep that from happening? I know the maintainers are busy people, and that it can take a long time to work through and review 100s of open issues and PRs, so out of respect to them, I was just taking a "be patient; they'll get to it when they get to it" approach. Sometimes an issue is not so much "stale" as it is unnoticed, forgotten about, or consciously deferred for later. So if anything, after a certain length of time, if a maintainer still hasn't reviewed/merged/accepted/rejected a pull request, then perhaps it should instead be auto-bumped, put on top of the queue, to remind them that they (preferably a human) still need to review it and make a decision about its fate... :)
  6. icla2020b.jonreeve.com icla2020b.jonreeve.com
    1. arranging his opinion

      Is Old Cotter just really that slow and scatterbrained that he has to "arrange" his opinion? What does "arranging" your opinion mean? Trying to make it as appealing as possible for someone else? Trying to actually come up with what you think about? Although I think it's vague for a reason, however you interpret this says a lot more about you than about the narrator I think, who has clearly already made up their mind about Old Cotter.

    2. bad

      Interesting that while the aunt said "not good", Cotter said "bad" again...he seems to not be consistent with having strong opinions...

  7. Oct 2020
  8. Sep 2020
  9. Aug 2020
    1. I found that many people have bad experience when it comes to styling in Material-UI, so I want to help them overcome that point and see the beauty of it.
  10. Apr 2020
    1. Pro tip: Just use standard and move on. There are actual real problems that you could spend your time solving!
    1. Don't use it! Writing simple assertions (and Minitest way of transforming them to expectations) is almost always a better idea anyway. Work with your favourite library authors to start with assertions and add matchers for convenience and not the other way around. Keep it simple.
  11. Mar 2020
    1. Q. Why does Rubinius not support frozen and tainted? A. Rubinius has better features; frozen and tainted are considered harmful. To elaborate... Both frozen and tainted depend on strewing checks throughout the source code. As a classic weak-link system, only one of those checks needs to be misplaced for the guarantees offered by either to fail. Since the number of checks is high, and as new code is written new checks need to be considered, the features inherently constitute unbounded complexity and unbounded risk.
  12. Jan 2020
    1. A president with credibility

      Repetition used to emphasize a point he is trying to make. He clearly enjoys using rhetorical strategies in his writing, instead of taking a straight-forward, completely formal voice.

    1. Such verbose. Much code. Very bloat. Wow. We've lost all the awesome association introspection that ActiveRecord would otherwise have given us.
  13. Nov 2019
  14. Dec 2018
  15. Jul 2017
    1. When he read the Web address, http://pubweb.northwestern.edu/~abutz/di/intro.html, he assumed that the domain name “northwestern.edu” automatically meant it was a credible source. He did not understand that the “~” character, inserted after the domain name, should be read as a personal Web page and not an official document of the university.

      Even though I consider myself web literate enough to tell the difference between a personal and academic page, I honestly didn't know that the "~" denoted that. I really need to get better about thinking of web addresses and code as a language (which they are).

  16. Apr 2017
    1. Believing there is no God means the suffering I’ve seen in my family, and indeed all the suffering in the world, isn’t caused by an omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent force that isn’t bothered to help or is just testing us, but rather something we all may be able to help others with in the future. No God means the possibility of less suffering in the future.

      Opinions are one thing but when it comes down to this crazy world we live in, I would have to say that God is not the only reason people are suffering. We face our own difficulties and challenges and there is more then one reason to everything. That's just my opinion.