11 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
  2. Apr 2021
    1. I strongly prefer this over Carcassonne. It plays faster (I don't want a tile laying game to go for more than 30 mins or so) and I happen to like the limited options. Carcassonne just gets on my nerves because I just don't view selecting between so many placement options to be that interesting. Obviously, YMMV. Ditto the previous statement, it's different than Carcassonne. And that's why I like it.
    1. I must say I am quite surprised by so many negative reviews. To me this little game is pure genius. There's something about it you just can't put your finger on... something strange, hard to define. The premise is utterly simple - roll left or right - but the game keeps adding new possibilities every level. And it doesn't make a fuzz about it. "Here's something completely new, it's there, who cares". The mechanics and physics are spot on and the game explores them brilliantly. Visually it's beautiful and the characters you interact with are strange and fascinating. A feeling of novelty and discovery permeates the game from start to finish.Here's my suggestion: watch some videos of the gameplay and see if it bothers you. If not, go for it, for you've barely seen the tip of the iceberg.
  3. Mar 2021
    1. This is gonna be an uphill slog and I'm really excited for it. If you know that's what you're getting into (a long slow grind on puzzles that may not fit well together), this could be great - especially if you're invested in both the work and the community (posting on here helps loads with games like this!) Your mileage may vary!
    1. As to why both is_a? and kind_of? exist: I suppose it's part of Ruby's design philosophy. Python would say there should only be one way to do something; Ruby often has synonymous methods so you can use the one that sounds better. It's a matter of preference.
    1. Again, this is all opinion-based, and due to the sheer number of developers who rely on this technology as their bread and butter, sub-communities and religiousness forms around patterns, anti-patterns, practices, de-facto standards, micro-packages, polyfills, frameworks, build-tools, etc.
    2. For instance, those who prefer classical inheritance may enjoy the addition of the class keyword, while others may reject it as conflicting with the idea of a prototypical inheritance model.
    3. JavaScript, as a language, has some fundamental shortcomings — I think the majority of us agree on that much. But everyone has a different opinion on what precisely the shortcomings are.