22 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
  2. Aug 2021
    1. We can use the itertools.combinations function to find all possible subsets of a chord for a given cardinality.

      Ha! Found a Ruby method to do the same thing in Sonic Pi. https://in-thread.sonic-pi.net/t/exploring-modes-of-pitch-class-sets-using-chord-invert/5874/10?u=enkerli

      Glad this is explicitly mentioned here as it was my initial goal as I got into musical applications of Set Theory!

  3. May 2021
  4. Mar 2019
  5. Apr 2018
  6. Mar 2018
  7. Jun 2017
    1. But there were certainly many kinds of instruments being played in Jamaica at the time.

      John Taylor (1687) describes a "kitt" thusly: "Then those pore slaves leave off work and repaire to their houses, where they gett their suppers, make a great fier, and with a kitt (made of a gourd or calabash with one twine string)"

    2. Angola

      We have interpreted this piece as a call and response between the vocal line and the melody line. Are there other ways to interpret this? We also have not been able to identify what the vocal line means. We presume the language is Central African, but what language might this be? What does the word or phrase mean?

      During the Jamaica Musical Passage Workshop, Earl "Chinna" Smith heard a song called "Runaway" within this piece. You can see them interpret it here:

      https://youtu.be/wlxc75J_ZxM

    3. body movement, spirituality, and often, political organizing

      This was powerfully illustrated at the end of the Musical Passage Workshop in Jamaica, which concluded with a recognition and celebration of Rastafari elder Sam Clayton through song & dance:

      https://youtu.be/vwndevpkmns

    4. Welcome to the Musical Passage discussion!

      We are delighted to hear your thoughts both about the current state of the site and some of the ways we might envision expanding it, particularly in order to include contemporary interpretations of the music.

      We participated in a workshop held at the Institute of Jamaica in Kingston on March 17, 2017, during which Rastafari musicians listened to interpretations of Sloane offered here and then played their own versions of the sings. You can watch five videos of the workshop, which include interpretations of Koromanti 2, Koromanti 1, Angola, & Papa, starting here:

      https://youtu.be/f9AC6BsskDE

      We hope to organize other such events involving a variety of musicians in the future. We are curious therefore if you have thoughts about the following questions:

      Are there ways we might incorporate such material directly in the site?

      Or would it be better to create some kind of other portal or site to showcase this material and other interpretations by musicians? If so, what types of approaches/ tools would be best for this?

      We also welcome your thoughts about any other aspects of design or content!

      Thank you,

      Laurent Dubois, David Garner, and Mary Caton Lingold

    5. a flexible feel inviting improvisation

      In the Musical Passage Workshop in Jamaica, Earl "Chinna" Smith did a great improvisation on the piece using slide guitar, which was a really interesting way of engaging with the scales laid out in the piece:

      His solo is here about 7 minutes into the video:

      https://youtu.be/f9AC6BsskDE?t=7m10s

    6. a beat divided into 3 parts instead of two

      There was an interesting discussion between a scholar named Peter Espeut & Earl "Chinna" Smith about the beat of this song during the Jamaica Musical Passage Workshop (starting about 10:20 in the video below)

      https://youtu.be/o9_B23_gAoo

    1. Anyone working with the latest generation of MIDI musical instruments – like the Eigenharp, LinnStrument, ROLI Seaboard, Haken Continuum and the Madrona Soundplane – has probably encountered the work of Belgium-based programmer & electronic musician Geert Bevin.

      My thoughts exactly.

      And it carries over to much of the world of expressiveness in electronic music, centred around the emerging MPE standard: Multidimensional Polyphonic Expression.

      Let me geek out a minute. ;)

      Coming late to this MPE game, been really taken by the fact that Bevin’s name is everywhere. Given his work with many manufacturers, it’s no exaggeration to say that this type of musical expressiveness wouldn’t have expanded the way it did if it weren’t for Geert Bevin. Of course, MPE isn’t that mainstream, yet. You could even say that it’s a bit of a niche, in terms of the already peculiar world of electronic music. Besides, it’s just an implementation of some things which have been in the MIDI specifications from the start, over 30 years ago. But there’s more than smoke, here.

      A few days ago, ROLI has announced the Seaboard Block, which might be the most affordable MPE device as of yet. It’s also the missing piece of the puzzle in ROLI’s lineup, linking the Seaboard line of highly expressive keyboards with the Blocks line of modular controllers. Some have been saying that the Seaboard Block is the point at which the Blocks line starts to make sense. Both there are more dots to connect. One is that ROLI also owns JUCE, which is fast becoming the tool of choice to develop music apps on multiple platforms, including mobile. Not sure how sophisticated JUCE’s MPE support is, but it does have some MPE-specific classes. Another point, mentioned in the comments on this interview, is that Bevin was instrumental in the MPE support in Moog’s Model 15 and Animoog synths on iOS. As these apps are quite influential, their continued development can have a big impact on the iOS part of the MPE scene.

      Speaking of iOS, the fact that the latest version of Audiobus can route MIDI could open up interesting possibilities. Jesse Chappell, developer of two MPE-savvy iOS apps (ThumbJam and DrumJam) has been teasing a forthcoming app which would somehow deal with MPE in a thorough way.

      And there’s a broader context for all of this. Hardware and software devices for electronic music (controllers, synthesizers, loopers, etc.) have been integrating into complete solutions. Several manufacturers have been doing both hardware and software. There aren’t that many hardware solutions for the sound output from MPE, but it’d only take a fairly simple box (maybe Arduino-based?) to allow much of the hardware synth world to receive MPE in an appropriate way (something which is already possible in software).

      So it really is a fascinating time to be getting into musical expressiveness through digital means.

  8. Jun 2016
    1. Two performances did seem to transcend the present, with artists sharing music that felt like open-source software to paths unknown. The first, Sam Aaron, played an early techno set to a small crowd, performing by coding live. His computer display, splayed naked on a giant screen, showcasedSonic Pi, the free software he invented. Before he let loose by revising lines of brackets, colons and commas, he typed:#This is Sonic Pi…..#I use it to teach people how to code#everything i do tonight, i can teach a 10 year old child…..His set – which sounded like Electric Café-era Kraftwerk, a little bit of Aphex Twin skitter and some Eighties electro – was constructed through typing and deleting lines of code. The shadowy DJ sets, knob-tweaking noise and fogbank ambient of many Moogfest performers was completely demystified and turned into simple numbers and letters that you could see in action. Dubbed "the live coding synth for everyone," it truly seemed less like a performance and more like an invitation to code your own adventure.
    2. The shadowy DJ sets, knob-tweaking noise and fogbank ambient of many Moogfest performers was completely demystified and turned into simple numbers and letters that you could see in action.
  9. Jan 2016
    1. the notion that those who spend their life glued to their Dr Dre Beats headphones ‘aren’t interested in music’ as they don’t read notation or have an interest in the cello.