41 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding

      Students can help each other learn by collaborating their efforts. Each student can bring a certain strength to the group so that they can all work out problems together

    1. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment

      This is what we learn in "teacher school". This is why we learn about many different ways of teaching and why the education system is set up the way that it is. Pedagogy is probably the most important aspect of lesson planning because it shows that we have an understanding of not only making content interesting to our students but managing behavior and assessing if they understand the information, all at the same time.

    2. By their very nature, newer digital technologies, which are protean, unstable, and opaque, present new challenges to teachers who are struggling to use more technology in their teaching

      How do we incorporate new technology into our teaching? What are ways in which these new technology features can be used in other ways than instruction? There has to be some place that we can use the new technology that will be beneficial to our students.

  2. Jan 2019
    1. It also requires students to learn solution design, meaning they have to diagnose problems, prescribe solutions, and even make those solutions with digital tools

      Learning how to deal with problems digitally can help students to learn how to work out problems in their daily lives and even other areas of technology.

  3. Dec 2018
  4. Nov 2018
    1. However, there is a strong sense in the international education field that whatever interactions may be occurring naturally are not enough, and that universities need to do a much better job of bringing domestic and international students together in an intentional way. The issue has taken on increasing salience as campuses have seen huge influxes of international undergraduate students from two main countries, China and Saudi Arabia, in recent years. A study published in the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication in 2012 found that nearly 40 percent of international students in the U.S. report having no close American friends. 

      This article discusses the need for American universities to help International students get integrated into their communities. This quote specifically mentions students from China and Saudi Arabia (where most of my students are from).

      This article is credible and has some good information about the topic in general, but it doesn't discuss the topic of technology integration. I was hoping that would be one of the solutions or at least topics in this article. Rating: 6/10

    1. Adult Graduate Student VoicesGood and Bad Learning Experiences

      This article reviews a longitudinal study of graduate students in a Master's degree program that collected both good and bad learning experiences. The comments collect from the participants resulted in themes that were repeated throughout all three years of comments. The comments were compiled to and reviewed to determine adult student perspectives on the learning process. The authors noted that their is a need to balance suppor of students with challenging students. This is a ground work of student perspective and requires further investigation to implement appropriate changes and then review student perspective after the changes.

      Rating: 7/10

  5. Oct 2018
    1. Some (36%) said they agreed that the threat of “‘fake news’ had made them distrust the credibility of any news.” Almost half (45%) lacked confidence with discerning “real news” from “fake news,” and only 14% said they were “very confident” that they could detect “fake news.”

      These numbers are insane!

  6. Aug 2018
    1. Indeed, school exclusion, without these supports, can exacerbate a bad situation. In the Parkland case, the fact that Nikolas Cruz had been expelled from school may have contributed to driving an angry young man who felt isolated to take out his frustration and anger by killing students and staff at his former school. In theory, zero-tolerance policies deter students from violent or illegal behavior because the punishment for such a violation is harsh and certain. However, research shows that such policies ultimately increase illegal behavior and have negative effects on student academic achievement, attainment, welfare, and school culture.
  7. Jul 2018
    1. Access to specialized, interest-driven and personalized learning used to be difficult and scarce. But in today’s networked world, there’s no reason why all children should not have the opportunity to pursue connected learning.

      Grants can be applied for to increase access to new technology, but it's about more than just having the technology to use (students may not have wifi at home, still lacking in other ways). Connected learning involves a teaching APPROACH that can be obtained with or without 24/7 access to technology and internet.

  8. Jun 2018
    1. Students are quick to realize that the goal in a debate is to win an argument, but

      they really like to win

  9. Oct 2017
    1. Brianna:I had a negative experience where, in my master’s, my supervisor encouraged me to submit one of my papers to a journal for publication. I just submitted the paper to a journal as a course paper without making any changes, not even changing the title page. The journal told me to re-submit with revisions, but I thought thatit was a rejection, and I stopped the process—it was intimidating. I thought being involved in a journal where I know some of the people and they won’t just get an online e-mail response from editors would be helpful

      Misunderstanding revise and resubmit; misunderstanding the difference between a student paper and an article.

    1. virtue & order

      It is ironic that two of the main values the authors wanted to instill in UVA students were "virtue and order." Early UVA students certainly were not virtuous. They drank and gambled constantly. Prostitution was rampant. They often engaged in physical fights and duels over the pettiest matters. Nor did they value order. They were known to assemble late at night on the lawn to shoot their guns, bang on drums, set off fireworks and sing dirty songs. This lack of order and virtue came to an apex when a rioting student killed a professor outside of Pavilion X. Information on these early students can be found in the book Rot, Riot and Rebellion by Rex Bowman and Carlos Santos, which I've been reading for my COLA. These instances show that while Jefferson's vision for his university was revolutionary, it was also very idealistic. What we see in this text does not always reflect what ultimately came to be.

    1. As an outcome of this Delphi Panel exercise, this study hasrevised Jane Knight’s commonlyaccepted working definition for internationalisation as'theintentionalprocess ofintegrating an international, intercultural or global dimension into the purpose, functionsand delivery of post-secondary education,in order to enhance the quality of educationand research for all students and staff, and to make a meaningful contribution tosociety'.This definition reflects the increased awareness that internationalisation has to becomemore inclusive and less elitistby not focusing predominantly on mobility but more on thecurriculum and learning outcomes. The ‘abroad’ component (mobility) needs to become anintegral part of the internationalised curriculum to ensure internationalisation for all, notonly the mobile minority. It re-emphasises that internationalisation is not a goal in itself,but a means to enhance quality, and that it should not focus solely on economic rationales.Most national strategies, including in Europe, are still predominantly focused on mobility,short-term and/or long-term economic gains, recruitment and/or training of talentedstudents and scholars, and international reputation and visibility. This implies that fargreater efforts are still needed to incorporate these approaches into more comprehensivestrategies, in which internationalisation of the curriculum and learning outcomes, as ameans to enhance the quality of education and research, receive more attention. Theinclusion of ‘internationalisation at home’ as a third pillar in the internationalisation strategyof the European Commission,European Higher Education in the World, as well as in severalnational strategies, is a good starting point, but it will require more concrete actions at theEuropean, national and,in particular, the institutional level for it to becomereality

      Using inclusive approaches to ensure all students have access to quality teaching and learning and why it shouldn't be limited to the mobile few. I find it interesting since a lot of research focuses on the gain for international students only.

  10. Sep 2017
    1. To develope the reasoning faculties of our youth, enlarge their minds cultivate their morals, & instil into them the precepts of virtue & order

      I find it interesting that the University made it a goal to cultivate the morals of the students attending their school. They also stress how they want to instill the precepts of virtue and order. They want to achieve this, yet they based the location of their school to be around the centrality of the white population. I do not believe this is cultivating the morals of their students. This is narrowing their viewpoints, and not expanding on the multitude of cultures that lie within the United States.

  11. Aug 2017
    1. The Web We Need to Give Students

      The title itself is expressive towards the fact that the educational system has been trying to come up with many ways to help students manage their understanding of the web in general.

      some 170 bills proposed so far ...

      Its no surprise tha tthe schools can share data with companies and researchers for their own benefits. Some of these actions are violations of privacy laws.

      arguments that restrictions on data might hinder research or the development of learning analytics or data-driven educational software.

      Unbelievable! The fact that there is actually a problem with the fact that students or anyone wants their privacy, but abusing companies and businesses can't handle invading others privacies is shocking. It seems to be a threat to have some privacy.

      Is it crazy that this reminds me of how the government wants to control the human minds?

      All the proof is there with telephone records, where the NSA breaches computers and cellphones of the public in order to see who they communicate with.

      Countries like Ethiopia; the government controls what the people view on their TV screens. They have complete control of the internet and everything is vetted. Privacy laws has passed! Regardless, no one is safe. For example: Hackers have had access to celebrity iCloud accounts, and exposed everything.

      The Domain of One’s Own initiative

      Does it really protect our identities?

      Tumblr?

      Virginia Woolf in 1929 famously demanded in A Room of One’s Own — the necessity of a personal place to write.

      Great analogy! Comparing how sometimes people need to be in a room all on their own in order to clear their minds and focus on their thoughts on paper to also how they express themselves in the web is a good analogy.

      ... the Domains initiative provides students and faculty with their own Web domain.

      So, the schools are promising complete privacy?

      ...the domain and all its content are the student’s to take with them.

      Sounds good!

      Cyberinfrastructure

      To be able to be oneself is great. Most people feel as if their best selves are expressed online rather than real life face-to-face interactions.

      Tumblr is a great example. Each page is unique to ones own self. That is what Tumblr sells, your own domain.

      Digital Portfolio

      Everyone is different. Sounds exciting to see what my domain would look like.

      High school...

      Kids under 13 already have iPhones, iPads, tablets and laptops. They are very aware to the technology world at a very young age. This domain would most likely help them control what they showcase online, before they grow older. Leaving a trail of good data would benefit them in the future.

      Digital citizenship:

      It teaches students and instructors how to use technology the right way.

      What is appropriate, and what is not appropriate?

      Seldom incluse students' input...

      Students already developed rich social lives.

      Google doc= easy access to share ones work.

      Leaving data trails behind.

      Understanding options on changes made?

      Being educated on what your privacy options are on the internet is a good way of protecting your work.

      Student own their own domain- learning portfolio can travel with them.

      If the students started using this new domain earlier in their lives, there should be less problems in schools coming up with positive research when it comes to the growth of the students on their data usages.

      School district IT is not the right steward for student work: the student is.

      So to my understanding, if the student is in the school, one has to remember to move around the files saved in the domain. The school is not responsible for any data lost, because the student is responsible for all their work.

      Much better position to control their work...

      If all of this is true and valid, it should not be a big deal then for the student to post what ever they want on their domain. No matter how extreme, and excessive it seems, if that is how they view themselves, their domain would be as unique as their personalities.

  12. Jul 2017
    1. The research was funded by a sponsor pursuant to a grant or sponsored research agreement or is subject to a Material Transfer Agreement (MTA), Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA), or other legal obligation that restricts ownership of intellectual property.
    2. The student made use of University resources other than non-specialized equipmentin connection with the research.
    3. The student performedthe research leading to the intellectual property while receiving financial support from the University in the form of wages, salary, stipend, or grant funds
    4. The ownership of intellectual property or novel results from research developed by a student vests with the student unless:
  13. www.webpages.uidaho.edu www.webpages.uidaho.edu
    1. UI employees and students retain all rights in the copyrightable materials they create except in the cases of “UI-Sponsored Materials” as defined in Subsection B-2-b below, materials subject to grant of a non-exclusive license to UI for public access as described in Subsection B-2-c below, materials covered by a Grant or Contract as discussed in Subsection E below, and materials covered by a valid written agreement between the natural person or persons and the UI as discussed in Subsection B-5 below.
    1. If a graduate or undergraduate student’s work is produced in the course and scope of such graduate or undergraduate student’s employment at the University, then the ownership of the copyrights with respect to such work vests in the University
    2. this policy provides that faculty members, staff researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students own the copyrights to works they produce during their academic careers at the University, subject to limited contractual exceptions and, in certain circumstances, limited use rights
    1. ABOR does not claim copyright ownership in Students’ dissertations intended to fulfill degree requirements. This means that students are free to publish, distribute, copy, modify, publicly perform, and publicly display their dissertations at their own discretion.
    2. Note that many students are employed or paid by the University in some capacity—often as graduate students under a sponsored research project or department- or faculty-controlled funding. Any such students will be treated the same way as faculty and other University employees for the purposes of this Policy and the ABOR IP Policy with respect to the paid work they perform. Students may be requested to grant rights in Student Works to ABOR or others as a condition of having access to certain class projects, research projects, collaborations, or other programs of the University.
    3. Basically, if a Student is acting in his or her capacity as a student (rather than as an employee) and does not make significant use of University Resources, ABOR does not claim ownership of that Intellectual Property.
    4. ABOR does not claim ownership of the copyright (i.e., the tangible expression) in "Scholarly Works,” “Fine Art,” or “Student Works” created by Covered Individuals. All of these terms (Scholarly Works, Fine Art, and Student Works) are specifically defined in the ABOR IP Policy. Excluded IP includes, without limitation, scholarly publications, textbooks, journal articles, syllabi, course materials and notes, research bulletins, monographs, books, play scripts, theatrical productions, poems, music, movies, art, and instructional materials that are created by a Covered Individual, usually a faculty member or a student, at his or her own direction and with only incidental use of University resources.
    1. as a condition of enrollment and awarding a degree, the University reserves an irrevocable, non-exclusive, free-of-cost and world-wide right to reproduce in any media and distribute to the public, on a non-commercial basis, copies of said theses and dissertations, unless to do so would impair the ability of the creator to commercially or professionally exploit the work
    2. Ownership of copyrights to works produced by enrolled students without the use of University funds (other than Student Financial Aid), that are produced outside any University employment and are not sponsored or commissioned works, shall reside with the student creator(s).
    1. The ownership of student works submitted in fulfillment of academic requirements shall be with the creator(s) with the following exception: upon request of the creators, the University shall determine ownership of works created from research or development activities that are collaborative efforts involving students, faculty or staff, or spanning several semesters.
    1. Students have used UMW Blogs to create literary journals, survey properties around Fredericksburg, build online exhibits, connect with the authors of the works their reading, publish their poetry, develop  in-depth online resources, and, of course, blog.

      examples of student uses of DoOO

  14. Jan 2017
    1. lthough it is clear that reading scientific papers becomes easier with experience, the stumbling blocks are real, and it is up to each scientist to identify and apply the techniques that work best for them.
    2. At the beginning, new academic readers find it slow because they have no frame of reference for what they are reading.
  15. Dec 2016
    1. In terms of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (2001), this means that students are doing the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor. This model contrasts from the traditional model in which “first exposure” occurs via lecture in class, with students assimilating knowledge through homework; thus the term “flipped classroom.”
  16. Jul 2016
    1. None of us, students and faculty included, have really figured out how to live, learn, and work in the emerging digital media-cognitive ecology. So it is certainly true that we can struggle to accomplish various purposes with technologies pulling us in different directions

      What could educators do to better prepare students to interact with digital media that leverages tech to go far beyond what paper and pen affords (tools, skills, etc.)?

  17. Apr 2016
  18. Mar 2016
    1. Beyond

      So there's more to it than building things and surviving? A student who plays minecraft told me today that he thinks you actually do learn what you are simulating in the game. "Like when you build a garden, you learn how to farm," he told me. Hmmmm.

  19. Feb 2016
  20. Nov 2015
  21. Jul 2015
    1. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.

      What does this central thesis -- I think -- feel like, get understood to mean... to a 15 year old?