193 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. NIHR HPRU in Behavioural Science and Eval Bristol. (2021, May 27). Event: The CONQUEST study has collected data on the contacts, behaviour & symptoms of staff & students @BristolUni during #COVID19 to inform policy & math modelling. Join us for this webinar on 8 June for an update on the study, its impact & future plans. Https://t.co/DHrmferP0L https://t.co/25cOASdyKJ [Tweet]. @HPRU_BSE. https://twitter.com/HPRU_BSE/status/1397906695775473671

  2. Jun 2021
  3. May 2021
    1. Dr Zoë Hyde. (2021, February 23). I don’t like to dwell on negatives, but something important happened recently that I’d like to make public. Shortly before Christmas, @mugecevik made a complaint to my university about me. When asked for details, she didn’t provide any. My employer took a dim view of the matter. [Tweet]. @DrZoeHyde. https://twitter.com/DrZoeHyde/status/1364184623262048259

  4. Apr 2021
    1. Anchoring an innovation center on a college campus also gives Starbucks access to ground-floor research and insight into Gen Z interests before scaling new products or processes to market
    1. It is hard to imagine even 50 million tonnes, yet this is equivalent in weight to all the commercial aircraft we have ever built throughout history, or 4,500 Eiffel Towers, enough to cover an area the size of Manhattan - and that’s just one year’s worth of the e-waste we create.

      For me as I assume with many others. When the totality of the waste we produce in a year is highlighted into a physical/relative means. It makes the issue that much easier to grasp. When the issue is discussed in large numbers, that may not draw as much panic but when broken down into the size of Manhattan or 4,500 Eiffel towers, we can imagine just how bad the problem is. Lastly, it is unfathomable we create this quantity of waste in a year alone. It makes areas such as the garbage patch easier to understand.

      https://youtu.be/OJtn5VOk1xI

      (A great video on how recycling plants can bring harmful effects to the individuals that live in the vicinity of them)

  5. Mar 2021
    1. WellAlwaysHaveParis il y a 7 ans • Testament to the power of the Internet...Leonard Bernstein has been dead for 23 years, and yet his knowledge, insight and wisdom perpetually echo forward for future generations.  This video was probably lost in an attic somewhere before somebody decided to drop it on YouTube.  It warms my heart that 59,000+ people have seen it.

      Recordings from the whole lecture series by “born teacher” Leonard Bernstein has been “making the rounds”, thanks in part to YouTubers like Adam Neely who has been linking to those videos in descriptions of some of his episodes.

      Part of the reason the series interests me for its #PedagogicalHeritage is that it extend Bernstein’s role, who’s been mostly known as a composer and conductor. These really are lectures, delivered on campus. At the beginning of the first lecture, Bernstein explicitly described his relationship to Harvard and his being “petrified” at lecturing there. His outside status is important. In music, it’s not uncommon for lectures to be given by renowned musical experts without the academic #credentials which usually serve to “qualify” a prof. According to his bio (archive), LB was a visiting prof at Brandeis in the 1950s. When he delivered those lectures on campus, he was “Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard”. The lectures were a significant part of the deal. There’s a direct continuity between the lecturer’s experience and the delivery of “teaching material”. In another context, the research behind those lectures might not have qualified a prof for tenure.

      There’s quite a bit about prestige to unpack, there. And more than a little about “The Canon”. If I use excerpts from this series in my teaching, I’ll likely start from that: who was Bernstein? Why does it matter that we hear his voice instead of somebody else’s? What learning affordances from these recordings, including the musical examples performed on the piano? The context would likely be my beloved ethnomusicology course. Otherwise, some kind of course about “broad approaches to music theorization”.

      What strikes me in this comment (and in the “well, actually…” reply) is the very notion that the Internet gives us access to something valuable. Yet this access might be taken away at a moment’s notice (the ways of the DMCA are impenetrable). Yes, DVDs exist and the content might be retrieved. It’s technically possible to make backups of those videos. Yet the 5Rs of Open Content aren’t obvious, here.

      Although, Neely did remix some of the content.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. David Dye. (2021, January 26). So if you work somewhere already like this maybe suggest how to really run a WFH/mobile collaboration uni, and how we re-tool the physical meeting place we then in light of that? Maybe the philosophers already know this?? [Tweet]. @DavidDye9. https://twitter.com/DavidDye9/status/1354176181042556929

  7. Jan 2021
  8. Dec 2020
  9. Oct 2020
    1. This displacement is of course operative in the de-funding of public universities, effectively transforming them into non-profits rather than state institutions. The effects of this program of neoliberal1 reform run deep, not least that the dominant motivator behind these privatized institutions becomes sustainability rather than service, leaving universities, like non-profits, in an endless cycle of fundraising and budget cuts.
  10. Sep 2020
    1. Leicester UCU en Twitter: “Universities are conducting an experiment, an experiment that involves human beings (university staff and students) and a life-threatening virus. But experimental subjects must give informed consent. (That's basic research ethics.)” / Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved September 26, 2020, from https://twitter.com/leicesterucu/status/1309107917879156737

    1. Howard Forman {@thehowie} (2020) Amidst many college outbreaks are a slew of very successful schools. My employer, @Yale, is among them: I hope they stay that way. Congrats to the students, faculty, staff, & our community for working together to achieve ZERO positive results in last 7 days. (9,425 tests). Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/thehowie/status/1308107599682756609

    2. (((Howard Forman))) on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved September 23, 2020, from https://twitter.com/thehowie/status/1308107599682756609

  11. Aug 2020
  12. Jul 2020