29 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2017
    1. p. 283 Ahhh. argues that it is the change of medium that priviledges the original in print culture, "hetereogeneity of the techniques used in successive segments"

    2. p. 283 argues that manuscript copies are "facsimiles" and carry the "aura" of the original. This doesn't seem true to me at all!

    3. p. 282 Argues that the marginal cost of production in manuscript culture is similar to digital in that the first copy is as expensive as the last "a situation to which we are actually returning now with digital copies" (but this is infact not true: the first copy contains all the costs in digital).

    4. p. 280 discusses how we say that a performance of a play, for example, revives an original, but we don't say this about facsimiles of things.

    5. 279 Argues that print authors are famous because they are reproduced

  2. Apr 2017
    1. For instance, in history and the humanities at most universities in the United States, there is a vertically integrated industry of monographs, beginning with the dissertation in graduate school—a proto-monograph—followed by the revisions to that work and the publication of it as a book to get tenure, followed by a second book to reach full professor status. Although we are beginning to see a slight liberalization of rules surrounding dissertations—in some places dissertations could be a series of essays or have digital components—graduate students infer that they would best be served on the job market by a traditional, analog monograph.

      Career paths as vertical industry

    2. Almost by definition, academics have gotten to where they are by playing a highly scripted game extremely well.

      Academics are good at playing scripted game

    3. What we did not anticipate was another kind of resistance to the web, based not on an unfamiliarity with the digital realm or on Luddism but on the remarkable inertia of traditional academic methods and genres—the more subtle and widespread biases that hinder the academy’s adoption of new media. These prejudices are less comical, and more deep-seated, than newspapers’ penchant for tales of internet addiction. This resistance has less to do with the tools of the web and more to do with the web’s culture. It was not enough for us to conclude Digital History by saying how wonderful the openness of the web was; for many academics, this openness was part of the problem, a sign that it might be like “playing tennis with the net down,” as my graduate school mentor worriedly wrote to me. ((http://www.dancohen.org/2010/11/11/frank-turner-on-the-future-of-peer-review/))

      Resistance to new forms on part of academia

    4. The story of Nate Silver and FiveThirtyEight has many important lessons for academia, all stemming from the affordances of the open web. His efforts show the do-it-yourself nature of much of the most innovative work on the web, and how one can iterate toward perfection rather than publishing works in fully polished states. His tale underlines the principle that good is good, and that the web is extraordinarily proficient at finding and disseminating the best work, often through continual, post-publication, recursive review. FiveThirtyEight also shows the power of openness to foster that dissemination and the dialogue between author and audience. Finally, the open web enables and rewards unexpected uses and genres.

      On how the web introduces new genres--example of Nate Silver and his ending up at the NYT

  3. Mar 2017
  4. Jan 2017
  5. Dec 2016
  6. Nov 2016
    1. Green Day

      Green Day began in San Francisco, California, as an escape for two troubled teens— Michael Dirnt and Billie Joe Armstrong. Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard) was the son of a heroin-addicted mother. A Native American woman and her white husband adopted Dirnt, but they divorced when he was an adolescent. At that time, Dirnt returned to his birth mother, then left home at age fifteen, renting a room from the family of a school friend—Billie Joe Armstrong. (The friendship had solidified around the time of the death of Armstrong's father, when Billie Joe was about ten years old.) Dirnt and Armstrong eventually moved out on their own, inhabiting various basements throughout Berkeley, California, and frequenting a club called the Gilman Street Project.Armstrong and Dirnt hired Jeff Kiftmeyer as the new drummer and began touring. Upon their return to California in 1990, Gilman Street Project regular Tré Cool replaced Kiftmeyer as the drummer. This combination turned into the formula for Green Day's success as the band tried to bring punk rock into the mainstream.This trio of tattooed, pierced, and dyed-hair 22-year-olds emerged in 1994 as one of the hottest commodities in the entertainment business and ushered in punk as the heir apparent to grunge in rock and roll's quirky evolution. For all their efforts, the band has helped make punk mainstream and opened the gates for other punk bands including former Lookout! labelmates, the Offspring and Rancid.

    2. "American Idiot" - Green Day

      Green Day's first number one album since 1994's multi-platinum Dookie--which is likely due to the fact that while the lyrics may have a deeper meaning, the hooks are still there, and they are played with the same intensity that made the group famous more than a decade ago. Spin said the title track was "Green Day's most epic song yet.

    3. And can you hear the sound of hysteria?

      Like their punk predecessors, Green Day showed commitment and passion in their songs while reveling in disorder with their outlandish stage theatrics. Whether drawn to the on-stage antics or the music, listeners have always responded well to Green Day. Audiences have purchased an unprecedented number of the band's albums and continue to attend their concerts in large numbers. Both critics and music industry organizations have handed the band honors and praise for its music and lyrics.

    4. All across the alien nation,

      Their lyrics dwell on "hormone-related" issues such as alienation, resentment, disillusionment, hopelessness, and self-destruction. Typically punk, they preach redemption through realism. It is not surprising then that Green Day's material was once classified as "music for people with raging hormones and short attention spans.

    5. Well, maybe I'm the ______ America.

      Moreover, critics lauded Dookie for its melodies and lyrics as well as for its controlled frenzy. In June 1994, Time reviewer Christopher John Farley even went so far as to declare the work the best rock CD of the year. In 1995, Dookie won the prestigious Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Performance. Rolling Stone Music Awards also recognized Dookie as the best album of the year and named Green Day the best band of 1995. "Longview" from Dookie also received two honors at Billboard's Music Video Awards. It was MTV's constant playing of "Longview" that made the punk-pop song more than an alternative hit and Green Day a major crossover success with mainstream audiences. Similarly, Green Day's singles earned impressive credits. In 1995, for example, "When I Come Around" spent more than twenty weeks on Billboard's Hot 100 Chart, eighteen weeks on the Modern Rock Tracks Chart, eleven weeks on the Hot 100 Recurrent Air Play List, and nine weeks on the Top 40 Air Play Chart. The next year "Geek Stink Breath" endured for eight weeks on Billboard's Hot 100 Air Play Chart.

    6. Don't want a nation under the new media.

      If ever an alternative rock group epitomized modern punk, it would be Green Day. Influenced by groups like British punk rockers The Sex Pistols and The Clash, as well as by the 1960s British Invasion pop group The Kinks, Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, and Tré Cool built on the British punk sound of the 1970s to carve their own place in pop music history.

  7. Jul 2016
  8. current.ischool.utoronto.ca current.ischool.utoronto.ca
    1. A gentle introduction to studying digital humanities, and into the digital humanities community in general, was the beginner workshop group entitled “Digitization Fundamentals and Their Application.” The focus of this workshop was to develop a functional knowledge of different methods of acquiring, refining, processing, and utilizing information pertaining to artefacts, aural or visual, static or animated. The course outlined how to plan successful digitization projects, develop an organizational structure to manage large caches of data, select appropriate devices and formats for input, and create platforms for display and dissemination of output. Each day was dedicated to a specific element of digitization - usually a medium, such as audio or video, but occasionally on a form of output, such as how to host digitization projects on the web. The mornings were generally spent acquiring the foundational knowledge needed to plan and implement a digitization project in that day’s medium, and in the afternoons participants were given free access to a wide range of equipment to help put the morning’s fundamentals into practice. This workshop allowed participants to practice digitization both in the lab and in the wild, as they were able to choose to work within one of the University of Victoria’s well-appointed computer labs or take equipment to a nearby site of their choice, such as the University of Victoria’s McPherson Library and its rare book room.

      Structure of the fundamentals class

    2. ese courses are the core of the DHSI curriculum, offering students the opportunity to learn in small, collegial groups at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels - and indeed offering faculty the opportunity to be students again for a week. That levelling spirit is reinforced by other aspects of the Institute which bring the various courses together. At the beginning and end of each day, all DHSI participants attend plenary lectures by leading practitioners in the field, which brings all participants together in the same room to consider questions that all digital humanists face (such as the nature of the academic job market, or lessons to be learned from particular projects). In recent years the morning lectures have showcased short presentations by graduate students in the field, a symptom of how student-driven the field has become even during the seven years since the DHSI began.

      The structure of the camp

    3. eek-long event that has run every spring since 2004, the DHSI combines the best aspects of a skills workshop, international conference, and summer camp. Participants spend five days attending plenary lectures and pursuing their own projects in courses on topics such

      description of DHSI

    4. The Digital Humanities Summer Institute and Extra- Institutional Modes of Engagement

      Bialkowski, Voytek, Rebecca Niles, and Alan Galey. 2011. “The Digital Humanities Summer Institute and Extra-Institutional Modes of Engagement.” Faculty of Information Quarterly 3 (3): 19–29. http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/system/files/pages/publications/fiq_3-3.pdf#page=19.

  9. Jan 2016
    1. In 2011, when Mohra Ferak entered the law department at Dar Al-Hekma, her immediate family was supportive, but others were horrified.