35 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2022
    1. I almost feel like I should get to draw the interface that I want for myself. like how Acme lets you grow your own palette of commands as you work.

      Some incarnation of the Fly Pentop/Livescribe focused on this.

  2. Apr 2022
    1. Trans sex attacksSeven sexual assaults have been carried out by transgender prisoners in women’s jails, the Ministry of Justice has disclosed.The release of the figure has fuelled a debate over whether men who are transitioning to become women should be held in female prisons.A spokesman for the MoJ said that between 2010 and 2018, “out of the 124 sexual assaults that occurred in the female estate a total of seven were against females in custody perpetrated by transgender individuals”.The prisons where the attacks occurred were Bronzefield, Foston Hall, Low Newton, New Hall and Peterborough. None of the attacks were against staff.It was not made clear whether the assaults had been proven or the attackers punished. Nor was it disclosed whether the attackers were born as males and were transitioning to become women, or whether – like the majority of trans prisoners in the women’s estate – they were born as women and were transitioning to become men. Only those still transitioning were counted, not those who had already legally changed gender.Nicola Williams, director of the campaign group Fair Play For Women, told The Mail on Sunday: “These new figures are another warning about something everyone knows: Allowing males into female prisons is dangerous for women.”Since 2010, prisoners who have legally changed gender have automatically been sent to the appropriate prison for their new gender. The rules were altered in 2016 so that prisoners who are transitioning can apply to move. Requests are considered by Complex Transgender Case Boards, charged with ensuring that “checks and balances are in place to manage the risks both to the transgender prisoners themselves and others”. Last year seven male-born transitioning prisoners were admitted to female jails. Downview, a women’s prison, has a special unit where male-born transgender prisoners can sleep and shower while mixing with the main population in daytime activities.
    2. Unlikely release of 4,000

      The Government has given its clearest signal yet that it has shelved plans for the early release of 4,000 prisoners.

    3. up to 70 pregnant prisoners and women in mother-and-baby units would be freed early on health grounds.

      But later it says:

      Fraser said that as of May 11, a total of 81 prisoners had been granted early release due to coronavirus – 55 under ECTR, 21 pregnant women or new mothers, and five on compassionate grounds.

  3. Dec 2021
  4. Nov 2021
    1. Homeboy Industries is the largest gang rehabilitation and re-entry program in the world. For over 30 years, we have stood as a beacon of hope in Los Angeles to provide training and support to formerly gang-involved and previously incarcerated people, allowing them to redirect their lives and become contributing members of our community.
    1. We said we were going to take ex-convicts and ex-addicts and teach them to be teachers, general contractors, and truck drivers. They said it couldn’t be done. We said we were going to take 250 people who had never worked and had no skills and teach them to build a 400,000 square foot complex as our new home on the waterfront. They said it couldn’t be done. We said we were going to partner with colleges and get people who started out functionally illiterate to achieve bachelor of arts degrees. They said it couldn’t be done. We said we were going to run successful restaurants, moving companies, furniture making, and cafés and bookstores without any professional help. They said it couldn’t be done. We said we were going to do all this with no staff, no government funding, and no professionals. They laughed and said it couldn’t be done.
    1. Beyond the real, historical prisons of too much tidiness and those where anarchy engenders the hell of physical and moral chaos there lie yet other prisons, no less terrible for being fantastic and unembodied—the metaphysical prisons, whose seat is within the mind, whose walls are made of nightmare and incomprehension, whose chains are anxiety and their racks a sense of personal and even generic guilt.
    1. "Over the past few years I've come to appreciate that freedom of [mental] movement is the key," he said, highlighting the nature of liquidity in putting thoughts to the page. "When you look about the freedom of your own hands moving, you have such incredible freedom of movement."'
  5. Oct 2021
  6. Sep 2021
    1. Campbell’s lived experience as a native Black Bostonian showed her firsthand how uneven and oppressive the school-to-prison pipeline can be. Her late twin brother, Andre, was a victim of the systems she works to rebuild.

      Campbell should have won! She is earnest and has a clear vision for what Boston can be to address these systemic issues.

  7. Aug 2021
  8. Jul 2021
    1. Rodolfo: I'm a victim of sexual abuse in the United States and there was a police report made and everything. And I've also been a victim of gang violence. I was never, you can check my background and everything. I was never into gangs or anything, but around the area I lived in there was a bunch of gangs and... I was beat up two or three times bad just by walking home. And it was all documented, I had police reports and everything. And because of that I was in therapy for while. My mother sought out a help from a psychiatrist because of the sexual abuse I had as a child in California, as a matter of fact.Rodolfo: I took Risperdal and a Ritalin, Risperdal for the anxiety and the Ritalin and for the ADHD. So, we tried everything. The mental health side, the mental health asylum, everything. But it was just going to take longer and longer and longer and I was tired of it. I didn't want to be locked up anymore. So, finally I just told my mom, “You know what man, that's it, I'm done. I don't want to do this anymore.” She asked me, “Is this what you want to do?” And I told her, “Yeah.”Rodolfo: She told me, “You know what? I'd much rather see you over there and be free then not being able to see you here at all.” Because there was a lot of people that went to go visit their loved ones and they used to get picked up. Sometimes they wouldn't even let you see your loved ones and right away ask you for your identification, your social security card, your nationality and everything and they would get picked up.Rodolfo: And I always told my mom, “Don't ever come visit me. Don't ever come visit me because if you do, chances are they're going to take you too.” And you know, that would always break my heart because I would want to see my mom. I'd want to see my dad and everything, but I wasn't able to. So, that experience was just horrible.Sergio: When you were in the detention center what were the conditions? Did you have access the medicine you needed? Did you have access to food and water?Rodolfo: The company that made the jail was called GEO Corp and they were actually, I'm not going to lie to you, they actually were pretty good, health-wise, not so much security-wise. A lot of things would happen in there that definitely shouldn't have ever happened. But with the food and everything, it was good. In my opinion it was because of the company. I feel as though if it was up to the government... Thank God it was an independent company that was hired by DHS as opposed to if DHS were to make their own jail, I feel they would be completely different.Rodolfo: It was [Pause] a pleasantly... there's no way to describe it, it was bad. It was bad, but for what it was I guess it was okay. I don't see there being an in-between or any pretty way to paint that picture as to how good or bad it was in there. Because at the end of the day you're deprived of your freedom. You can't just pick up the phone whenever you want and call your loved ones because you've got to pay for that too. You got pay for that. And if you want to take a shower, you have to buy your soap, right? You've got to buy it yourself, you've got to buy everything. And now you're becoming a liability for your family, you're becoming another bill.Rodolfo: You're becoming another bill and that's what I didn't want. So, that's why I started working. And now, older, I'm becoming another bill. So, I don't get it. You're taking us away from the jobs that we have and everything. You know? So, take us back to our country. And I'm not sure if it this is a fact or not, but I was reading when I first got in here, there was a time where there wasn't enough field workers for, I think, avocado—or, not avocado, I think it was oranges or something like that.Rodolfo: And I remember me saying, “Well, there goes all the deportees. There goes all the people you guys deported. Where are the people that were so outraged because we took your jobs? Go ahead, there you go. There are a lot of vacancies, making these open for those jobs, go ahead, man. All yours buddy, knock yourself out.”Rodolfo: But nobody wants to work those jobs, right? You see what I'm saying though, right?

      Leaving the US, Reason for Return, Deportation, Voluntary departure, Family decision, No hope for a future in the US, Detention, Treatment by; Time in the US, Violence, Sexual Abuse, Gangs, Bullying, Fear of, Jobs/employment/work

  9. May 2021
  10. Mar 2021
  11. Oct 2020
    1. eight years after release, men are 43% more likely to be taken back under arrest than women; African-Americans are 42% more likely than whites, and high-school dropouts are three times more likely to be rearrested than college graduates.

      but are these possibly the result of external factors (like racism?)

  12. Sep 2020
    1. thebest estimate of the impact of additional incarceration on crime in the United States today is zero. And, while that estimate is not certain, there is as much reason overall to believe that incarceration increasescrime as decreases it
  13. Aug 2020
  14. Jul 2020
  15. Jun 2020
  16. Nov 2017
    1. the terrible, horrible, no-good university administrators are trying to build a panopticon in which they can oppress the faculty
    1. Mount St. Mary’s use of predictive analytics to encourage at-risk students to drop out to elevate the retention rate reveals how analytics can be abused without student knowledge and consent

      Wow. Not that we need such an extreme case to shed light on the perverse incentives at stake in Learning Analytics, but this surely made readers react. On the other hand, there’s a lot more to be said about retention policies. People often act as though they were essential to learning. Retention is important to the institution but are we treating drop-outs as escapees? One learner in my class (whose major is criminology) was describing the similarities between schools and prisons. It can be hard to dissipate this notion when leaving an institution is perceived as a big failure of that institution. (Plus, Learning Analytics can really feel like the Panopticon.) Some comments about drop-outs make it sound like they got no learning done. Meanwhile, some entrepreneurs are encouraging students to leave institutions or to not enroll in the first place. Going back to that important question by @sarahfr: why do people go to university?

  17. Mar 2017
    1. What I do know is that I get the very distinct feeling that certain systems I use are not convivial. Google+, Facebook, WordPress, Twitter while full of humans, feel closed, feel like templates to be filled in not spaces to be lived in. Hence, the need for outsiders more than ever to raise the question especially in this week of connected courses where we are talking about the why of why.

      Absolutely.

      Very much depends from which perspective we are looking.

      This is absolutely key.

    1. He led me to a melamine walled box. Inside, there was no sign of  a person having spent any time there.

      prison hell alienation

    2. I was left in my doorless empty box,

      meaningless box. prison. jail. hell.

  18. Oct 2016
    1. Oklahoma Correctional Industries; workers scan the original photos and prepare metadata

      We can make the argument here that the University of North Texas, the Oklahoma Historical Society, and the Ethics in Journalism Foundation support de facto slave labor. Let's be honest here: "workers" = "prisoners"

  19. Jul 2015
    1. The biggest beneficiaries of private prisons’ political donations have been Republican politicians in Florida, Tennessee, and border states with high populations of undocumented immigrants.

      surprise, surprise

    2. Instead, private prison contracts often require the government to keep the correctional facilities and immigration detention centers full, forcing communities to continuously funnel people into the prison system, even if actual crime rates are falling

      WTF WHY DO WE HAVE QUOTAS FOR OUR PRISONS?!

    1. I am really interested in the possibilities, the prospect of bipartisan legislation around the criminal justice system -- something that I think directly speaks to some of the themes I mentioned on Friday. And we’ve seen some really interesting leadership from some unlikely Republican legislators very sincerely concerned about making progress there.