10 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
    1. She op'nd, but to shut Excel'd her power; the Gates wide op'n stood,

      If the Gates of Hell are open, all the devils can follow Satan and get out. (I'm reminded of Pandora's box - when she opened the box she wasn't supposed to open, all the evils (except Hope) escaped and then represented afflictions cast upon humanity.

    2. And thrice threefold the Gates; three folds were Brass, [ 645 ] Three Iron, three of Adamantine Rock, Impenetrable, impal'd with circling fire, Yet unconsum'd.

      Milton is referring to the Nine Gates of Hell, which Dante presented in his Inferno (part of the Divine Comedy). See http://historylists.org/art/9-circles-of-hell-dantes-inferno.html

    3. bhorred Styx the flood of deadly hate, Sad Acheron of sorrow, black and deep; Cocytus, nam'd of lamentation loud Heard on the ruful stream; fierce Phlegeton [ 580 ] Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage. Farr off from these a slow and silent stream, Lethe the River of Oblivion roules Her watrie Labyrinth, whereof who drinks, Forthwith his former state and being forgets, [ 585 ] Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain.

      Milton takes the ancient Greek geographical concept of Hades and its rivers - when Hades is not at all like hell -and uses it as basis for the Christian hell (maybe in part because he and many Christian leaders placed pagans and others of virtue who lived before Christ in the Limbo between Heaven and Hell).

      Wikipedia has an article on the Greek underworld Hades at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_underworld Wikipedia also has a page on Christian views of Hades. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_views_on_Hades The rivers that Milton mentions exist in the Greek view of hell but with some slight differences. For example, Styx is not "abhorred Styx the flood of deadly hate". Gods swore unbreakable oaths on the River Styx, whose waters were believed to make one invulnerable to death.

  2. Jan 2018
    1. I know you’re worried about access to airports. Good news: every airport in the world, especially those in the United States, serve as gateways to Hell. Where do you think Chili’s Too comes from? Who do you think trains TSA workers? It is especially easy to get from Hell to LaGuardia. Most people can’t even tell they’ve made the trip.

      This is true.

  3. Mar 2017
    1. He led me to a melamine walled box. Inside, there was no sign of  a person having spent any time there.

      prison hell alienation

  4. Oct 2016
    1. The more you try to be God without God, the more isolated, alone and estranged you are.

      Hell is separation. Hell is being disconnected from God. And this disconnection can lead to deeper and deeper states of fear, anger and depression.

      http://www.newmessage.org/wiki/Hell

    1. Burning burning burning burning

      This book is called The Fire Sermon, but is only here at the end that we get fire. This book, like much of the poem, has a motif of water. In this book specifically, we have the Thames, damp ground, the sailor home from sea, fisherman, the river, barges, and more. There is little to do with heat or flames. In a piece with so little to do with fire, it makes us ask the question: why is this section called The Fire Sermon? It is followed by a reference to the Lord. Is the poem referencing Hell?

    2. O Lord Thou pluckest me out

      This part of the poem feels like it is a reference to the lost souls trapped in Hell and are demanding to be removed by telling the Lord, but it doesn't seem like they are repenting in any way, just demanding.

  5. Jun 2016
    1. It is important to note, however, that throughout all of this, we have always had the best intentions.

      Will sound like a rhetorical question, but still: why is it important to note this? Or, more specifically, who is this important for? People from this project have been heard clinging to their intentions, before this (as Courtney Martin notes, very candid) update. In some ways, the “best intentions” are the very problem to be solved. The project wasn’t something which happened from the ground up. It was based on some people’s best intentions. As Martin also noted, those on the other side of the equation probably didn’t receive the same kind of apology. But they’re the real victims, here. In this kind of work, doing something is often much much worse than doing nothing. This update, while candid, resonates with Negroponte’s attitude:

      people really don't want to criticize this, because it is a humanitarian effort, a nonprofit effort and to criticize it is a little bit stupid, actually.

      As Tiny Spark is showing, time and time again, humanitarianism is precisely what requires deep and broad critical thinking. Not merely “best intentions”.

  6. Sep 2015
  7. www.gutenberg.org www.gutenberg.org
    1
    1. Him the Almighty Power Hurled headlong flaming from th' ethereal sky, With hideous ruin and combustion, down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In adamantine chains and penal fire,