30 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
  2. Apr 2019
    1. One must first learn to know himself before knowing anything else (γνῶθι σεαυτόν). Not until a man has inwardly understood himself and then sees the course he is to take does his life gain peace and meaning; only then is he free of that irksome, sinister traveling companion — that irony of life, which manifests itself in the sphere of knowledge and invites true knowing to begin with a not-knowing (Socrates) just as God created the world from nothing. But in the waters of morality it is especially at home to those who still have not entered the tradewinds of virtue. Here it tumbles a person about in a horrible way, for a time lets him feel happy and content in his resolve to go ahead along the right path, then hurls him into the abyss of despair. Often it lulls a man to sleep with the thought, "After all, things cannot be otherwise," only to awaken him suddenly to a rigorous interrogation. Frequently it seems to let a veil of forgetfulness fall over the past, only to make every single trifle appear in a strong light again. When he struggles along the right path, rejoicing in having overcome temptation's power, there may come at almost the same time, right on the heels of perfect victory, an apparently insignificant external circumstance which pushes him down, like Sisyphus, from the height of the crag. Often when a person has concentrated on something, a minor external circumstance arises which destroys everything. (As in the case of a man who, weary of life, is about to throw himself into the Thames and at the crucial moment is halted by the sting of a mosquito.) Frequently a person feels his very best when the illness is the worst, as in tuberculosis. In vain he tries to resist it but he has not sufficient strength, and it is no help to him that he has gone through the same thing many times; the kind of practice acquired in this way does not apply here. (Søren Kierkegaard's Journals & Papers IA Gilleleie, 1 August 1835)
  3. Mar 2019
    1. “Why, that looks like that nice dull young man that tried to sell me a Bible yesterday,” Mrs. Hopewell said, squinting. “He must have been selling them to the Negroes back in there. He was so simple,” she said, “but I guess the world would be better off if we were all that simple.” Mrs. Freeman‖s gaze drove forward and just touched him before he disappeared under the hill. Then she returned her attention to the evilsmelling onion shoot she was lifting from the ground. “Some can‖t be that simple,” she said. “I know I never could.”

      Mrs. Hopewell and Mrs. Freeman see Manley as a "simple" man, that he's not that bright since he's just a young man selling Bibles to anyone he can, that he can't do much else. But after the encounter with Hulga, the audience knows that he is indeed smarter than he looks as he said. Manley is a manipulator and uses religion to get what he wants by trying to pass as a "good country person."

  4. Oct 2018
    1. There was not one of the nobles though who dared to wake up that warfaring man or to discover how the warrior had done with that holy woman, the maiden of the Measurer.

      dramatic irony

  5. Aug 2018
  6. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility for his entry had been followed by a pause of talk.

      I don't think in this sentence "gentility" is a good word. I think he must feel unconfident when entering the shop, because he is from the lower class and he doesn't have enough money. The writer emphasizes his stress and lack of confidence through irony.

  7. Jul 2018
    1. How strange! She looked up at the pale sky, and all she thought was, “Yes, it was the most successful party.”

      There is no denying that Laura thinks a party with the dead is not a successful party. So I supposed that it is a verbal irony. There are also many ironies in The Moonstone. How can we track the irony through a computational method? I think this example of irony gives me an inspiration. There are some passive words which indicate the meaning that is ostensibly expressed in this paragraph, but "the most successful" are positive words. The strong contrast can be a typical symbol for the computer to recognize irony.

    2. Don’t be so extravagant.

      Is terminating a party extravagant or going to large extents to hold a party for the upper class when a man just died outside the gate extravagant? It seems ironic here.

    3. Really, it was very tactless of father...

      Another case of dramatic irony here, when Mrs. Sheridan and the other girls seem to be the ones who are "tactless", ignoring and being insensitive to the suffering taking place around them.

    4. "This Life is Wee-ary, A Tear—a Sigh. A Love that Chan-ges, This Life is Wee-ary, A Tear—a Sigh. A Love that Chan-ges, And then... Good-bye!"

      I think this song can be considered a motif of the story, but it also seems ironic that Joe sings "This Life is Weary" with a "mournful" and "enigmatic" expression when she had never experienced the true weariness of leading a poor life and never had to undergo the toils of labour.

  8. Feb 2018
    1. In any case, though Gehry’s perspective might seem less focused on nature, he, too, is actually thinking about ecosystems

      pointing out an irony—Gehry and the people he disagrees with are both thinking about ecosystems

  9. Dec 2017
    1. and what chains them to their present state of barbarism & wretchedness, but a besotted veneration for the supposed supe[r]lative wisdom of their fathers and the preposterous idea that they are to look backward for better things and not forward, longing, as it should seem, to return to the days of eating acorns and roots rather than indulge in the degeneracies of civilization.

      This can be considered to be quite an insulting progression of thoughts. The founders classify the indigenous populations as barbaric and wretched, deeming their conservative methods and practices preposterous. This leads me to question how much the founders valued respecting others' cultures and traditions; it seems as if they jump to conclusions without properly understanding or appreciating the indigenous population as a collective society.

      It's also quite ironic that the founders ridicule the indigenous populations for respecting and looking to their fathers for advice and knowledge, yet, expect future members of the University of Virginia community to consult this document for guidance.

    2. We have proposed no formal provision for the gymnastics of the school, altho a proper object of attention for every institution of youth. These exercises with antient nations, constituted the principal part of the education of their youth. Their arms and mode of warfare rendered them severe in the extreme. Ours on the same correct principle, should be adapted to our arms & warfare; and the manual exercise, military maneuvres, and tactics generally, should be the frequent exercises of the students, in their hours of recreation.

      I found this clause intriguing. The founders affirm their belief that physical education is of utmost importance and should be addressed by "every institution of youth." However, the founders chose not to include a formal provision of "gymnastics." More interesting are the reasons behind why the founders deemed physical education necessary; they attribute it to the importance physical health and strength play in warfare. Ironically, the University offers physical education centered classes now, when the likelihood of students being drafted into a war is extremely low.

  10. Nov 2017
    1. Indeed we need look back only half a century, to times which many now living remember well, and see the wonderful advances in the sciences & arts which have been made within that period.

      I found this statement interesting because it demonstrates the never-ending trend of society continuously advancing and moving forward. It is almost comical to think back how in 1818, when the document was written, the writers believed that their society and educational systems were so advanced. Looking back, this was obviously not the case; however, it is true that they had made many advances from previous centuries. Furthermore, today’s society has surpassed the first generations of UVA by a remarkable amount, not only in the technological and educational regard, but also in the moral regard, considering the original UVA was a school for solely white men of high status. The “indigenous” neighbors the document goes on to mention who the writers perceive to be less advanced than themselves are described as “barbaric and wretched.” This description is ironic considering the low moral standard of these founders who are almost barbaric and wretched themselves. Finally, it is again ironic that the writers are calling themselves “advanced” when they still have ignorant and amateur views about themselves and others.

    1. And, in general, to observe with intelligence & faithfulness all the social relations under which he shall be placed.

      Again, I find it important to note the emphasis placed by the founders on encouraging social intelligence as well as academic intelligence. The University was not meant solely as an institution of book-learnin', but also one of character development. Still, this sentiment is rather ironic in the face of UVA's history, but I prefer to look at it from the perspective of self-betterment. The social relations of the university are certainly included in "all the social situations under which [the student] shall be placed," so change can be made from the inside, especially with the advent of student self-governance.

    1. A Professor is proposed for antient Languages, the Latin, Greek and Hebrew, particularly, but these Languages being the foundation common to all the Sciences, it is difficult to foresee what may be the extent of this school. At the same time no greater obstruction to industrious study could be proposed than the presence, the intrusions, and the noisy turbulence of a Multitude of small boys: and if they are to be placed here for the rudiments of the Languages, they may be so numerous, that its character & Value as an university, will be mixed in those of a Grammar school. It is therefore greatly to be wished, that preliminary schools, either on private or public establishment, would be distributed in districts thro the state, as preparatory to the entrance of Students into the University.

      This quotation strikes me particularly as brilliant and also ironic. In the rockfish report, the founders are including not only the foundation of UVA but also a prep. school system to feed into UVA. This is mentioned in with the purpose of including the multiples languages being taught because it is indicative of the element of selective control that UVA was founded to uphold. It seems as if, on top of selectively admitting students who are deemed ideal enough to study at Mr. Jefferson' University, the board finds it crucial to grow generations of boys who will continue to fit their mold for years to come. The idea of preparatory schooling for a university is pretty progressive for the time which makes it brilliant as this model continues to be followed. However, it is ironic as it is going against the "life-long learning" mindset of Jefferson's plans. With a school filled with the exact same type of student, what dynamic between collaboration is there to learn from?

      Muhammad Amjad

  11. Oct 2017
    1. All our steps in creating or absorbing material of the record proceed through one of the senses—the tactile when we touch keys, the oral when we speak or listen, the visual when we read. Is it not possible that some day the path may be established more directly?

      Throughout reading this article I couldn't help but laugh at the dramatic irony of our experience as students in 2017 reading Bush's predictions for the future of mechanics and technology in 1991. He speaks with a bit of wonderment, obviously trying to shock the reader with ideas considered fantastical at the time and then undermining them as "not so fantastic;" the joke of course being that even his most fantastic ideas seem rudimentary to us. That is, until I reached this part of the article, where Bush's predictions seem to have closely aligned with those of our own in the modern era. In this quote he seems to suggest a total departure from the tactile, oral, visual, and so on. Whether explicitly or not, Bush is referencing transcendence of machine (mechanical or digital) which, when you think about it, is a "fantastic" notion even by our standards of technology in 2017.

    1. While it would be stupid to deny the importance of constituencies and audiences in the construction of an intellectual argument, I think it has to be supposed that many arguments can be made to more than one audience and in different situations. Otherwise we would be dealing not with intellectual argument but either with dogma or with a technological jargon designed specifically to repel all but a small handful of initiates or coteries.

      The irony of the student's statement against Said is that by attacking him for not having the name of not including names of scholars of a specific background, the student ends up purely appealing for the interest of a specific group of individuals rather than speaking of how to make the message itself more universally accepted. Her statement of attack clearly displays how she cares more about the status of the names mentioned rather than the messages they offer which is a mentality similar to the priorities of most upper class elites in every civilization who end up creating an unnecessary divide between people of different backgrounds.

  12. Sep 2017
    1. Education, in like manner engrafts a new man on the native stock, & improves what in his nature was vicious & perverse, into qualities of virtue and social worth; and it cannot be but that each generation succeeding to the knowledge acquired by all those who preceded it, adding to it their own acquisitions & discoveries, and handing the mass down for successive & constant accumulation, must advance the knowledge & well-being of mankind: not infinitely, as some have said, but indefinitely, and to a term which no one can fix or foresee. Indeed we need look back only half a century, to times which many now living remember well, and see the wonderful advances in the sciences & arts which have been made within that period.

      I found this particular quotation particularly interesting because of the amount of irony and hypocrisy that it is riddled with. It speaks of the importance of education to create "a new man", however we know that this new man is of only a light skin color and most likely a slave-owner, not to mention the exclusion of women. Moreover, in my engagement Making the Invisible Visible, a key focal point is that what is unwritten is often just as important as what's written. Here, in the mentioning of the fact that education is better for the "well-being of mankind", it is implied that solely educating the white male slave owners will be progressive to civilization because of newfound knowledge that will be entrusted with them. As such, in mentioning that education is meant to be passed down to successive generations, the unwritten irony is in the fact that increasingly only a smaller amount of the entire population will be educated because of the ratio to the enslaved people population to the non-enslaved people population. This quotation shows the naive yet justified mindset of the elite class in education administration and society as a whole in the early 19th century America.

      • Muhammad Amjad
  13. Jun 2017
    1. “Caesar, beware of Brutus; take heed of Cassius; come not near Casca; have an eye to Cinna; trust not Trebonius; mark well Metellus Cimber; Decius Brutus loves thee not; thou hast wrong’d Caius Ligarius. There is but one mind in all these men, and it is bent against Caesar. If thou be’st not immortal, look about you: security gives way to conspiracy. The mighty gods defend thee! Thy lover, Artemidorus.”

      Shakespeare employs this very short scene to build up tension in the play for the assassination of Caesar. The scene focuses on a letter written by Artemidorus, who is one of Caesar’s true supporters. This letter warns of an assassination that is being plotted against Caesar, and lists all of the conspirators involved.

      There is a sense of irony in the manner in which the letter in written. Artemidorus writes with an incessant urgency in his letter, stating to “Beware of Brutus, take heed of Cassius, Come not near Casca, …” and on and on. Its irony lies in the fact that Artemidorus, a man capable of great prose, is reduced to simple words in his desperation and fear of Caesar’s life.

      This letter, and how Artemidorus views Caesar, give an indication to us of the greatness of Caesar. In the letter, he states that “There is but one mind in all these men, and it is bent against Caesar”. This claim contradicts with the impressions the audience would have had of Brutus, with his supposed struggles in going ahead with the assassination.

      As Constantin Stanislavski said, “There are no small parts, only small actors”. This is especially true with Artemidorus. Although he does not appear otherwise in the play, this short scene and his letter demonstrates the greatness of Caesar, and the love and admiration that many have of him. It also acts to clarify the friends and foes of Caesar, as well as discrediting their supposed struggles in going ahead with the assassination.

  14. Mar 2017
    1. What does draw the ire of yours truly is when a film maker casts two females who look nearly identical in roles that bear little distinction from one another as a result of either poor writing or bland acting.

      What draws the ire of yours truly is that you say "yours truly" in your writing.

  15. Feb 2017
    1. Previous to the nineteenth century, physicians classified diseases based on the observation of the pre-conditional symptoms known at the time

      Since the medical practices to reveal abnormalities was not an entirely accurate way to "read" bodies, could it be possible that the 19th century norm only became the standard because they couldn't examine bodies to their fullest?

  16. Oct 2016
    1. April is the cruellest month

      It's ironic that "April is the cruelest month", because April usually represents spring, birth, rejuvenation, etc. This suggests that death is present in the "waste land". Even though spring brings life, it also brings death; whatever is born must die.

  17. Sep 2016
    1. And in examining his life and his words, I'm sure we both realize we have more work to do to promote equality in our own countries -- to reduce discrimination based on race in our own countries.  And in Cuba, we want our engagement to help lift up the Cubans who are of African descent -- (applause) -- who’ve proven that there’s nothing they cannot achieve when given the chance.

      It is ironic that he speaks of elimination discrimination based on race, but then insinuates that Cubans specifically of African descent have proven to be superior in overcoming adversity. I could be wrong.

  18. Dec 2015
  19. Nov 2014
    1. In that same speech, he argued that an international body of climate change scientists “resembled a Soviet-style trial, in which the facts are predetermined, and ideological purity trumps technical and scientific rigor.”

      Senator James Inhofe couldn't have chosen better words to describe himself and his cohorts.

  20. Mar 2014
    1. http://bouncycastle.org/download/bcprov-jdk16-146.jar

      This should almost certainly say "https".

  21. Dec 2013
    1. This of course makes the life of someone writing Emoji-handling code more difficult, as pretty much all the boilerplate you’ll find out there assumes a single UTF-8 codepoint per character glyph (since after all, this was the problem that Unicode was supposed to solve to begin with).
  22. Sep 2013
    1. All this has availed me nothing; on the contrary, I who have lived to this advanced age without complaint from anyone could not be in greater jeopardy if I had wronged all the world.
    1. Why, if they were to sell any other commodity for so trifling a fraction of its worth they would not deny their folly

      It is interesting that Isocrates considers the Sophists as salesmen of what he believes to be a worthless commodity. It is ironic because Isocrates, himself being a Sophist, does not mention much about his own pedagogical methods. He does not offer much in the way of advice and suggestions for improvement; only criticism.