6 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. Examples of different ways of defining forms

      Wow, that's a lot of different ways.

      The inline_form way in particular seems interesting to me, though it's worth noting that that method is just an example, not actually part of this project's code, so it's not really a first-class option like the other options.

    1. For the usage in society, see Second-class citizen.
      1. Ironic that this reference is ostensibly about the usage of "first-class citizen" in society, yet it links to a seemingly-mismatched (by name only, that is) article, entitled "second-class citizen".

      2. Ironic that the first-class (unqualified) article is about the figurative meaning of "citizen" used in computer science, and that the page describing first-class and second-class status of the more literal citizens in society is relegated to what I kind of think is a second-class position in the encyclopedia (because it takes the #2 position numerically, even though it is (at least as is implied in this reference) also about first-class citizens (though the word "first-class" does not appear a single time in that article, so maybe this reference is the one that is more ironic/incorrect).

    2. In programming language design, a first-class citizen (also type, object, entity, or value) in a given programming language is an entity which supports all the operations generally available to other entities. These operations typically include being passed as an argument, returned from a function, modified, and assigned to a variable.
    1. In computer science, a programming language is said to have first-class functions if it treats functions as first-class citizens.
  2. Oct 2020