54 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. Drawing from constructivist principles, the authors address how emotions affect motivation and learning for adults. They then provide practical application for instructors to implement to create productive learning environments where adult learners feel safe to explore new knowledge and learn from their experiences.

      9/10: while most of the application is to learning in general, the strategies are still applicable to technology in the classroom

  2. Aug 2019
    1. a syllabus can’t mandate a particular emotional experience

      And yet, machines are being invented and put in to use that attempt to measure student emotion and attention to inform assessment...

  3. Jun 2019
    1. “We can predict if residents are happy based on their digital interactions with the service, which gives us more information about whether they will renew their leases,” says Zego CEO Adam Blake.

      happy? Defined as? Lisa Feldman Barrett, the Neuroscientist and author of How Emotions are Made, argues that emotions are constructed. In other words, who gets to say what is "happy"? Adam Blake does?

  4. May 2019
    1. Yoslow observed that the Third-Generation has a deep affection for humanity, which is a transformation of the post-Holocaust trauma. This process is the ability to transform the emotional effects of the Holocaust by letting go, and thus increases the quest for meaning in ones life and concern for social issues.
  5. Apr 2019
    1. “Emotion is not opposed to reason; our emotions assign value to experiences and thus are the foundation of reason.”
    2. “Under normal conditions people react to a threat with a temporary increase in their stress hormones. As soon as the threat is over, the hormones dissipate and the body returns to normal. The stress hormones of traumatized people, in contrast, take much longer to return to baseline and spike quickly and disproportionately in response to mildly stressful stimuli. The insidious effects of constantly elevated stress hormones include memory and attention problems, irritability, and sleep disorders. They also contribute to many long-term health issues, depending on which body system is most vulnerable in a particular individual.”
    1. Securely attached kids learn the difference between situations they can control and situations where they need help. They learn that they can play an active role when faced with difficult situations. In contrast, children with histories of abuse and neglect learn that their terror, pleading, and crying do not register with their caregiver. Nothing they can do or say stops the beating or brings attention and help. In effect they’re being conditioned to give up when they face challenges later in life.
    2. Agency starts with what scientists call interoception, our awareness of our subtle sensory, body-based feelings: the greater that awareness, the greater our potential to control our lives. Knowing what we feel is the first step to knowing why we feel that way. If we are aware of the constant changes in our inner and outer environment, we can mobilize to manage them.
    3. When our senses become muffled, we no longer feel fully alive. […] In response to the trauma itself, and in coping with the dread that persisted long afterward, these patients had learned to shut down the brain areas that transmit the visceral feelings and emotions that accompany and define terror. Yet in everyday life, those same brain areas are responsible for registering the entire range of emotions and sensations that form the foundation of our self-awareness, our sense of who we are. What we witnessed here was a tragic adaptation: In an effort to shut off terrifying sensations, they also deadened their capacity to feel fully alive.
    4. The body keeps the score: If the memory of trauma is encoded in the viscera, in heartbreaking and gut-wrenching emotions, in autoimmune disorders and skeletal/muscular problems, and if mind/brain/visceral communication is the royal road to emotion regulation, this demands a radical shift in our therapeutic assumptions.
  6. Feb 2019
    1. to manage ourselves

      Good point - it's tempting to think that hot moments are in the student domain, but that's not entirely true. Faculty have reactions too.

    2. For some instructors, hot moments are the very stuff of classroom life. They thrive on such moments, encourage them, and use them for pointed learning. Others abhor hot moments and do everything possible to prevent or stifle them. For them, conflict prevents learning.

      One presumes the same is true of students. But how does a student know which style a faculty member prefers, and vice versa?

    1. and omit<; the use of the true signs of the passions, which are, tones, looks, and gestures.

      This happens in poetry all the time. When we just read the words on the page (which we'll often do internally), we miss so much of the tonal and sonic qualities of the work. Listening to a poet actually read their work aloud is always fascinating, because suddenly you're thinking "oh, this was meant to be performed, and I'm supposed to actually feel these things."

  7. Jan 2019
  8. www.poetryfoundation.org www.poetryfoundation.org
    1. In her poetry, though, veneration for the erotic is freed from agricultural associations and traditional formulas and seems rather the natural expression of an individual whose observations are true to the complexity of her experience and include conflicted and aggressive emotion.

      Some scholars suggest that Sappho's poetry does not necessarily reflect her personal emotions and experiences, since they were probably written for public performance and may have been recited by a choral group. Such groups had 15 members, but typically sang in the first-person singular "I". What do you think?

  9. Dec 2018
    1. Second, I have a not-very-well supported theory that’s paired with the book Thinking, Fast and Slow. The behavior design implication of that book is that you need to speak to two systems of the brain. Speaking to the rational, Slow System is easy. Just lay out the facts.Speaking to the emotional Fast System is much harder, namely because it’s so hard to see or introspect on what’s going on in there. But if you accept that difficulty (and this is the part of my theory that feels like pop brain science), then you realize that you need to start looking for ways to rewire your emotional core.Then, having accepted that rewiring your emotions is part of most behavior design, I’ve started to notice things — like that most self-improvement advice is not very rational. That’s by design. A self-improvement book is mostly emotional rewiring. That is exactly why you need to read the entire book rather than cheating with a summarized version.

      This is an interesting sounding take. Worth thinking about further.

  10. Sep 2018
    1. Put more directly what you are really saying is that you claim the right to be unhappy – Alright, I claim the right to be unhappy

      The use of the phrase "claim the right to be unhappy" here is most indicative of the type of culture that the film created. Emotions are no longer inherent or natural, they are something you must claim or fight for. To have "the right" to something inherently means that it is not simply given. It makes the issue one of possession rather than oppression. It's not that the new society is oppressing the emotions, but rather that they are no longer claiming/possessing them.

    1. That’s Dr. Hunter, isn’t it? “By the Way do you mind if I ask you a personal question?

      HAL, a supposedly emotion feigning ultra-intelligent A.I., has just asked Dave if he could ask him a "personal question?" This should raise a concern in Dave, but it doesn't. Earlier in the film, during the BBC interview, the interviewer asked the Astronauts if HAL had emotions or if he was just faking it, their reply was that he was definitely programmed to feign emotions, however the fact whether if he actually had emotions or not remains a mystery. In this scene HAL acknowledges the existence of emotions by asking if he can ask a question that might incite a negative emotional response, a "personal question." This revelation should have frightened Dave, because it shows that HAL is more than a computer and is capable of more than just controlling the ship and maintaining optimal performance, HAL is capable of reading emotions and perhaps even capable of being afflicted by them.

  11. Feb 2018
    1. But within the context of contemporary politics this minor event points toward a larger and more pressing concern: as the old manual trades die away, what symbols do we have to convey a sense of collective identity as laborers within the machinery of capitalism?

      Another personal aspect of the writer personal life to further his argument. Growing up farming this cultural portrayal of machetes as weapons undermines his identity. A traditionalist view on the matter shows that the culture that the writer grew up in is being over taken by a violent and terror fantasia that is infecting the the idealism of his identity. He is also trying to gain sympathy with the audience, portraying his old livelihood being destroyed in front of his every eyes. Using pathos to persuade his audience of this cultural take over.

    2. However, one thing remains constant: those who use it as a tool in their daily lives are also the most likely to turn to it as a weapon, because it is often the only option available to the slave, the peasant, or the proletariat within the agricultural regions of the tropics.

      The writer bring in the view of revolt which runs deep in American culture since really the foundation of America was based on revolutions. This article was most likely published to feature an American audience so by bridging its emotional and cultural history is a great persuasive tactic. Though it never explicitly said revolts the use of slaves and pheasants using machetes as a weapon can imply such. The writer is trying to discretely imply this notion to the reader in order to make them think and have a deeper and more personal connection with the topic.

    3. A story like Walker’s illustrates why the machete so well captures the problem of the tool vs. the weapon. This simple object is imbued with enormous symbolic political power, because its practical value can never be isolated from its violent potential.

      Object can signify any form of history, culture or emotion depending on how it presented. As Haltman puts it the views on objects can be potentially limitless but why do some views have more significance than the others. Well it all comes down to the culture of it. A recent bate on gun violence have surged popular media both main and social. Historically in America guns were used as a point of self-defense and a balance of power but recent tragedies in Parkland and Las Vegas and any other mass shooting in America has depicted them as killing machines. As practical as a "tool" maybe the cultural significance will always tip the scale to what society depicts it to be.

    4. the machete has a special place in the labor history of Florida, where for three and a half centuries slaves and wageworkers cut sugarcane in the fields by hand. Indeed, machetes are unique to the extent that they have always been used for both purposes—and not just as a plot device in horror flicks, either.

      These historical contexts make a strong point of evidence to argument. A lot of times when examining a object its historical meaning comes to mind and bringing up dark historical points in America's history of slavery to argument brings up some emotional feelings to the mix. It goes beyond the scholarly talk of an object and expands the idea of the object to further the readers interpretation of it. By using more of these emotional deductions it serves as a bridge to speculation about meaning for the reader. (Haltman 8)

  12. Dec 2017
    1. It’s evidence of something that really happened. I wasn’t alive then, and it wasn’t taught in our history classes.” She was still uncertain about the painting. “I don’t know if it has the right emotionality,” sh
        1. she is kind of worried that she did not portray it the way ppl during the time would imagine it
        • she was not alive at the time so she was not there to feel the emotions
  13. Mar 2017
    1. Basically, an organism experiences too much or too little of something either within them or around them in the environment (i.e. something deviates from neutrality or optimum balance), which is then detected by our brains (i.e. via neural maps of the body).

      That reminds me of a complex-adaptive system and an external condition or intervention that makes the resilience of the system kick in to cope with the threat to have its system functions remain intact. So emotions could be the body-mind-soul complex's defense mechanism.

  14. Feb 2017
  15. Oct 2016
    1. Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers.

      April is a time of rebirth, good for people with loved ones, but can be a lonely time for people who are alone. Winter seems like a better time of year because you can numb your emotions. And take joy in small doses (dried tubers).

  16. Sep 2016
    1. Passent les jours et passent les semaines            Ni temps passé      Ni les amours reviennent

      Peut-être le poète sent seul. Peut-être il regrette l'amour perdu.

    2. L'amour s'en va comme cette eau courante            L'amour s'en va      Comme la vie est lente Et comme l'Espérance est violente

      Ces mots sont très mélancolique. Le poète semble avoir perdu l'espoir dans l'amour.

    3. La joie venait toujours après la peine

      C'est une strophe très èmotionnel. Il y a la peine dans la vie mais l'espoir pour l'avenir après. C'est encourageant.

    4. L'amour s'en va comme cette eau courante            L'amour s'en va      Comme la vie est lente Et comme l'Espérance est violente

      Les mots sont très émotionnels.

    1. Guillaume Apollinaire

      (from Alcools)

      Le pont Mirabeau

      Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine Et nos amours Faut-il qu'il m'en souvienne La joie venait toujours après la peine Vienne la nuit sonne l'heure Les jours s'en vont je demeure

      Les mains dans les mains restons face à face Tandis que sous Le pont de nos bras passe Des éternels regards l'onde si lasse

             Vienne la nuit sonne l'heure
             Les jours s'en vont je demeure
      

      L'amour s'en va comme cette eau courante L'amour s'en va Comme la vie est lente Et comme l'Espérance est violente

             Vienne la nuit sonne l'heure
             Les jours s'en vont je demeure
      

      Passent les jours et passent les semaines Ni temps passé Ni les amours reviennent Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine

             Vienne la nuit sonne l'heure
             Les jours s'en vont je demeure
      
  17. Apr 2016
  18. Feb 2016
    1. narratives of emotional and social journeys from being at academic risk in high schools to being academically successful in universities academic experiences.

      These are indeed the stories we need to hear, and the data that needs to be collected -- how ever she drew data from narratives.

    2. the personal, social, and emotional transformations that adolescents and adults who are at risk experience as they develop resilience and shift from disengagement to engagement, and/or academic failure to success in schools.

      I think it's important to be able to identify the changes in attitude, relationships and moods that we can see when at-risk teenagers begin to be self-directed learners. If we could see what these changes look like and agree on them, then we might be able to assess students better. Currently none of the ways we move or prevent students from moving through school make sense to me: social promotion (advancement because of age), testing (usually of a small subset of math and reading skills), or even portfolio assessment (because at-risk students usually don't have a body of "mastery" level work).

  19. Jan 2016
    1. People rightly tend to be mean to those they are sure are assholes, so continued interaction between them will probably only serve to reinforce their beliefs the other is acting in bad faith.

      This reminds me of the situation of a parrot in front of a mirror. Will he fall in love with the other, or will he start hating him, ignoring the fact that he is only seeing his reflection? Once he starts acting on one of the affections, positive feedback kicks in.

  20. Nov 2015
    1. According to set point theory, our attitude and behaviors have a bigger effect on our happiness than our external circumstances – and that’s good news for mindfulness. Mindfulness shapes our brain by increasing gray matter in areas related to attention, learning, self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, and compassion.
    2. Mindfulness literally changes our brains, making some areas more responsive, interconnected, and dense. In particular, these are areas related to empathy (the insula); memory, emotion, and emotion regulation; and reward circuitry. In response to distressing stimuli, meditators see more activation in their prefrontal structures (for awareness) and less in their fear-driven amygdala.
    1. If I am grateful for something you provided to me, I have to take care of that thing—I might even have to reciprocate at some appropriate time in the future. That type of indebtedness or obligation can be perceived very negatively—it can cause people real discomfort. The data bear this out: When people are grateful, they aren’t necessarily free of negative emotions—we don’t find that they necessarily have less anxiety or less tension or less unhappiness. Practicing gratitude magnifies positive feelings more than it reduces negative feelings. If it was just positive thinking, or just a form of denial, you’d experience no negative thoughts or feelings when you’re keeping a gratitude journal, for instance. But, in fact, people do.
    1. We don’t have total control over our emotions. We cannot easily will ourselves to feel grateful, less depressed, or happy. Feelings follow from the way we look at the world, thoughts we have about the way things are, the way things should be, and the distance between these two points.
    1. Compared to people who didn’t receive the favor, including some who were put in a good mood by watching a funny video clip, the people who received the favor and felt grateful toward the confederate were more likely to go through the trouble of filling out the survey. This suggests the unique effects of gratitude in motivating helping behavior, more so than the general effects of simply being in a positive mood.
  21. Oct 2015
    1. Each of us has our own pet scenarios that chafe against our expectations. When they pop up, they threaten to stir up jealousy, anger, defensiveness, mindless striving, and a stew of other possibilities. We may end up saying or doing something hurtful, something we’ll regret later and may have to apologize for. We leapt before we looked. Conversely, when we stop to examine how we typically respond to situations, we create space for more creative and flexible responses. Ultimately, as we build the habit of mindfully examining our responses in the moment, mindful awareness becomes our new default mode.
  22. Sep 2015
    1. One of the greatest buffers against picking up others’ stress is stable and strong self-esteem. The higher your self-esteem, the more likely you will feel that you can deal with whatever situation you face. If you are finding yourself being impacted by others’ moods, stop and remind yourself how things are going well and that you can handle anything that comes your way. Exercise is one of the best ways to build self-esteem, because your brain records a victory every time you exercise, via endorphins.
    2. Instead of returning a harried coworkers’ stressed nonverbals with an equally stressed grimace of your own, return it with a smile or a nod of understanding. Suddenly you have the power. As suggested in the new book Broadcasting Happiness, you can create a “power lead” to short-circuit a negative encounter.
    3. if you create a positive mindset about stress and stop fighting it, you experience a 23% drop in the negative effects of stress. When we see stress as a threat, our bodies and minds miss out on the enhancing effects of stress. (Even at high levels, stress can create greater mental toughness, deeper relationships, heightened awareness, new perspectives, a sense of mastery, a greater appreciation for life, a heightened sense of meaning, and strengthened priorities.)  Instead of fighting and being frustrated at negative people around you, take it as an opportunity to feel compassion or a challenge to help that person become more positive. Our HBR article “Making Stress Work for You” includes more ideas on how to change your stress mindset to a more positive one.
    4. In our highly connected working world, we are hyper-exposed to other people. This means negative emotions and stress become even more contagious as we have high exposure to negative comments on news articles and social media; stressed body language of financial news shows; stressed out people on our subways and planes; and open office plans where you can see everyone’s nonverbals.
    5. New research shows that stress causes people to sweat special stress hormones, which are picked up by the olfactory senses of others. Your brain can even detect whether the “alarm pheromones” were released due to low stress or high stress. Negativity and stress can literally waft into your cubicle.
    6. secondhand stress is a result of our hardwired ability to perceive potential threats in our environment.
    7. Observing someone who is stressed — especially a coworker or family member — can have an immediate effect upon our own nervous systems. A separate group of researchers found that 26% of people showed elevated levels of cortisol just by observing someone who was stressed. Secondhand stress is much more contagious from a romantic partner (40%) than a stranger, but when observers watched a stressful event on video with strangers, 24% still showed a stress response. (This makes us question whether we, as happiness researchers, should watch Breaking Bad before going to sleep.)
  23. Sep 2014
    1. Cultural imprinting is the mechanism whereby an ad, rather than trying to change our minds individually, instead changes the landscape of cultural meanings — which in turn changes how we are perceived by others when we use a product. Whether you drink Corona or Heineken or Budweiser "says" something about you. But you aren't in control of that message; it just sits there, out in the world, having been imprinted on the broader culture by an ad campaign.

      Yes! Whence the emotional inception. If you don't buy that product that says you're super cool you are then filled with anxiety about whether you're cool. Etc.

      What's being described here isn't some other way in which advertising works other than emotional inception, it's the mechanism of that inception.

  24. May 2014
  25. Oct 2013
  26. Sep 2013
    1. Appropriateness. An appropriate style will adapt itself to (1) the emotions of the hearers, (2) the character of the speaker, (3) the nature of the subject.

      Situational

    1. the emotion of anger: here we must discover (1) what the state of mind of angry people is, (2) who the people are with whom they usually get angry, and (3) on what grounds they get angry with them. It is not enough to know one or even two of these points; unless we know all three, we shall be unable to arouse anger in any one.

      The only way to control emotions is through knowledge and study