133 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
    1. Still, persuasiveness need not take the form of logicalargumentation; it can just as easily involve appeal to sentiment,whipping up passions, deploying poetic metaphors, appealing tomyth or proverbial wisdom, employing irony and indirection, humour,insult, or appeals to prophecy or revelation; and the degree to whichone privileges any of these has everything to do with the rhetoricaltradition to which the speaker belongs, and the presumeddispositions of their audience.

      A list of means of persuasiveness:

      • use of logical argumentation
      • appeal to sentiment
      • whipping up passions
      • deploying poetic metaphors
      • appeal to mythology, proverbial or ancient wisdom
      • irony
      • indirection
      • humor
      • insult
      • prophecy/revelation
      • appeal to the rhetorical tradition to which the speaker belongs (pathos, ethos, etc.)
      • presumed disposition of the audience

      What others are there?

      Certainly Donald Trump didn't use logical argumentation. He didn't even frame things as being for something so much as being against other things.

  2. Nov 2021
  3. Oct 2021
    1. But first, a word of caution. Writing affirmations is a good way to manage stressful situations and mitigate negative thoughts for many people. However, for people with low self-esteem or depression, studies suggest that self-affirmation can be harmful. Repeating a statement that you do not believe to be true can make you feel worse. In circumstances where self-affirmations could do harm, it is more appropriate to invest in support from a therapist or counsellor.

      Our emotional state is a magnet for what we accent or believe, if we're positive we believe the positive and if we're negative we look for confirmation for that state. Maybe our emotious is our boss?

  4. Sep 2021
  5. Aug 2021
    1. Many of the snippets here talk about what was in individual commonplace books and how their contents indicated what was admired. What about the negative image of all the things which were excluded?

      What things did people read which they didn't commonplace? What does that say about them? Their times? The way they thought?

      Could their commonplacing be compared with their marginalia to show what rose to certain levels of interest and what didn't? Digging through the records to find and verify marginalia may be incredibly tedious in comparison with specifically kept things.

      Some of my own fleeting notes, which I keep because it's easy, may show some interesting things about the way I think in comparison to those things upon which I expand, keep, and value more for my work and my worldview.

  6. Jul 2021
    1. As I wrote in January, silence is effectively impossible on the contemporary internet, where “voids are just filled by other people’s content, and thus vanish instantly.”

      Where are the empty spaces on the internet? How can we design them into existence?

  7. Jun 2021
    1. We just cannot know all that life will throw at us, and if we want our grading contract to be fair and equitable for everyone, we need to reexamine it, reflect on how it has been working for each of us, and perhaps adjust it. 

      This idea of re-evaluating at regular time points can be a very useful and powerful tool in more areas than just writing.

      Society as a whole needs to look carefully at where it is do do this same sort of readjustment as well.

      It's the same sort of negative feedback mechanism which is at work in the scientific method and constantly improving the state-of-the art.

  8. May 2021
    1. Dr Zoë Hyde. (2021, February 23). I don’t like to dwell on negatives, but something important happened recently that I’d like to make public. Shortly before Christmas, @mugecevik made a complaint to my university about me. When asked for details, she didn’t provide any. My employer took a dim view of the matter. [Tweet]. @DrZoeHyde. https://twitter.com/DrZoeHyde/status/1364184623262048259

    1. Negative values are mostly unsupported in html email. So is CSS position. For webmail at least, this is so that your email doesn't render outside of the desired window. Imagine Gmail with your CSS or email affecting the interface - they've limited the CSS you can use specifically to prevent this.
  9. Apr 2021
    1. No, I'm afraid not. I wanted to like it, but it hasn't offered up anything to make me choose this over a wealth of other short two-player games. It should go without saying (but it's worth repeating in view of the responses such reviews tend to get on BGG) that a negative review is always subjective and personal to the reviewer.
    1. The areas which were most improved by exercising were patients' ability to understand social situations, their attention spans, and their 'working memory'

      That is an interesting set of improvements. These are negative symptoms that are resolved, which is largely what I'd expect. I'd bet there is some effect on positive symptoms too, but with low certainty. Moreover, these results are excellent in that negative symptoms are the hardest to treat.

  10. Mar 2021
    1. David Leonhardt. (2021, February 19). - About 1/3 of military troops who’ve been offered vaccine shots have declined. - When shots became available to Ohio nursing-home workers, 60% said no. - Among frontline workers in SoCal, the share was 40-50%. - N.B.A. stars are wary of doing public-services ads. (2/x) [Tweet]. @DLeonhardt. https://twitter.com/DLeonhardt/status/1362768083899793413

  11. psycnet-apa-org.lib-ezproxy.concordia.ca psycnet-apa-org.lib-ezproxy.concordia.ca
    1. Both higher levels of reported stress and theperception that stress affects health were independently associated with an increased likelihood of worsehealth and mental health outcomes. The amount of stress and the perception that stress affects healthinteracted such that those who reported a lot of stress and that stress impacted their health a lot had a 43%increased risk of premature death (HR1.43, 95% CI [1.2, 1.7])

      Căng thẳng ảnh hưởng xấu gia tăng nguy cơ tử vong

    1. I returned to another OER Learning Circle and wrote an ebook version of a Modern World History textbook. As I wrote this, I tested it out on my students. I taught them to use the annotation app, Hypothesis, and assigned them to highlight and comment on the chapters each week in preparation for class discussions. This had the dual benefits of engaging them with the content, and also indicating to me which parts of the text were working well and which needed improvement. Since I wasn't telling them what they had to highlight and respond to, I was able to see what elements caught students attention and interest. And possibly more important, I was able to "mind the gaps', and rework parts that were too confusing or too boring to get the attention I thought they deserved.

      This is an intriguing off-label use case for Hypothes.is which is within the realm of peer-review use cases.

      Dan is essentially using the idea of annotation as engagement within a textbook as a means of proactively improving it. He's mentioned it before in Hypothes.is Social (and Private) Annotation.

      Because one can actively see the gaps without readers necessarily being aware of their "review", this may be a far better method than asking for active reviews of materials.

      Reviewers are probably not as likely to actively mark sections they don't find engaging. Has anyone done research on this space for better improving texts? Certainly annotation provides a means for helping to do this.

    1. He introduces the idea of the apophatic: what we can't put into words, but is important and vaguely understood. This term comes from Orthodox theology, where people defined god by saying what it was not.

      Too often as humans we're focused on what is immediately in front of us and not what is missing.

      This same thing plagues our science in that we're only publishing positive results and not negative results.

      From an information theoretic perspective, we're throwing away half (or more?) of the information we're generating. We might be able to go much farther much faster if we were keeping and publishing all of our results in better fashion.

      Is there a better word for this negative information? #openquestions

  12. Feb 2021
    1. Help defend Monica from defamation! Stack Overflow, Inc. must repair the damage caused by their libel against Monica Cellio, cooperate with the community, be willing to talk, treat users with respect, learn about the world outside the United States, open the governance of the sites.
  13. Jan 2021
  14. Dec 2020
  15. Nov 2020
    1. The success of JSX has proved that the second curly is unnecessary. Moreover, a lot of people — particularly those who have been exposed to React — have a visceral negative reaction to double curlies, many of them assuming that it brings with it all the limitations of crusty old languages like Mustache and Handlebars, where you can't use arbitrary JavaScript in expressions.
  16. Oct 2020
    1. Weber notes that according to any economic theory that posited man as a rational profit-maximizer, raising the piece-work rate should increase labor productivity. But in fact, in many traditional peasant communities, raising the piece-work rate actually had the opposite effect of lowering labor productivity: at the higher rate, a peasant accustomed to earning two and one-half marks per day found he could earn the same amount by working less, and did so because he valued leisure more than income. The choices of leisure over income, or of the militaristic life of the Spartan hoplite over the wealth of the Athenian trader, or even the ascetic life of the early capitalist entrepreneur over that of a traditional leisured aristocrat, cannot possibly be explained by the impersonal working of material forces,

      Science could learn something from this. Science is too far focused on the idealized positive outcomes that it isn't paying attention to the negative outcomes and using that to better define its outline or overall shape. We need to define a scientific opportunity cost and apply it to the negative side of research to better understand and define what we're searching for.

      Of course, how can we define a new scientific method (or amend/extend it) to better take into account negative results--particularly in an age when so many results aren't even reproducible?

  17. Sep 2020
    1. The origin of these commandments follows the law of negative entities impressing information upon positively oriented mind/body/spirit complexes.

      Think about this "law". The law of negative entities is impressing information upon positively oriented beings. Interesting. Think of the old game, "Don't think of an elephant"

  18. Aug 2020
    1. This means that while groups can generate high levels of solidarity, which can in principle be put to powerful political effect, it also becomes harder to express disagreement within the group. If, for example, an outspoken and popular member of a neighbourhood WhatsApp group begins to circulate misinformation about health risks, the general urge to maintain solidarity means that their messages are likely to be met with approval and thanks. When a claim or piece of content shows up in a group, there may be many members who view it as dubious; the question is whether they have the confidence to say as much. Meanwhile, the less sceptical can simply forward it on. It’s not hard, then, to understand why WhatsApp is a powerful distributor of “fake news” and conspiracy theories.

      Instead of positive feedback like this, is there a way to create negative feedback loops in these social media apps?

  19. Jul 2020
  20. Jun 2020
  21. May 2020