196 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, January 19). RT @STWorg: Translations are beginning to roll in. We have the French translation of the policy summary live here: Https://t.co/qdLAaeDvzn… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1351532508349947905

    2. 2021-01-19

    3. Translations are beginning to roll in. We have the French translation of the policy summary live here: https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/lang-fr… @SciBeh @mariejuanchich List of forthcoming languages here: https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/lang
    1. Erik Angner. (2021, February 18). Periodic reminder that in terms of outcomes, Swedish corona policy is thoroughly average in EU comparison – not exactly a model to be emulated by the rest of the world, nor a crime against humanity that should be prosecuted in the Hague. Https://t.co/E1CHBFMs6S [Tweet]. @ErikAngner. https://twitter.com/ErikAngner/status/1362319246378872832

    1. Dank der tollen Unterstützung von @TheRealTweetmo , Thomas Traill & Ulrike Hahn gibt es jetzt die deutsche Übersetzung des Anfang Januar erschienenen "COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook" als "Kommunikationshandbuch zum COVID-19-Impfstoff" - https://sks.to/c19vax-de #COVID-19

    1. David Leonhardt. (2021, February 19). - About 1/3 of military troops who’ve been offered vaccine shots have declined. - When shots became available to Ohio nursing-home workers, 60% said no. - Among frontline workers in SoCal, the share was 40-50%. - N.B.A. stars are wary of doing public-services ads. (2/x) [Tweet]. @DLeonhardt. https://twitter.com/DLeonhardt/status/1362768083899793413

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 11). RT @EpiCOVIDCorps: The COVID Corps YouTube channel is live! Here’s who we are and what we’re about. New videos every Wednesday. Https://t.c… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1326848746093752321

    2. The COVID Corps YouTube channel is live! Here's who we are and what we're about. New videos every Wednesday.
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1328996195696578560

    2. 2020-11-18

    3. Replying to @SciBehThere is nothing wrong with making an error. But if your beliefs are based on a tenfold underestimation of risk they should change when that underestimation is corrected.
    4. A while back I queried the wisdom of reputable academics publishing on the Toby Young created website http://lockdownsceptics.org. This tweet this morning by its creator, I feel, sheds further light on that issue
    1. Prof. Devi Sridhar. (2020, March 25). We will be stuck in an endless cycle of lockdown/release for next 18 months, if we do not start mass testing, tracing, & isolating those who are carriers of the virus while pursuing rapid research for antiviral treatment or vaccine. This is the message the public needs to hear. [Tweet]. @devisridhar. https://twitter.com/devisridhar/status/1242743618986745861

    2. 2020-03-25

    3. We will be stuck in an endless cycle of lockdown/release for next 18 months, if we do not start mass testing, tracing, & isolating those who are carriers of the virus while pursuing rapid research for antiviral treatment or vaccine. This is the message the public needs to hear.
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 1 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1351206953033363462

    2. 2021-01-18

    3. I think (hope) there might be a bit more possible, though: tools and standards to help us move *toward* greater objectivity - there's a continuum there
    4. So true - so much so that there's a whole discipline devoted to the study of it, the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Watching it all play out on Twitter during Covid has been like watching SSK on speed. (Kudos to the social scis who address this as standard: "positionality")
    1. Sam Bowman. (2021, January 25). If the govt can’t keep a few thousand people fed in hotel quarantine, how exactly was it supposed to provide for fifteen million pensioners self-isolating in Great Barrington-style ‘focused protection’ while the virus was spreading across the rest of the population? [Tweet]. @s8mb. https://twitter.com/s8mb/status/1353666214883684352

    2. 2021-01-25

    3. If the govt can't keep a few thousand people fed in hotel quarantine, how exactly was it supposed to provide for fifteen million pensioners self-isolating in Great Barrington-style "focused protection" while the virus was spreading across the rest of the population?
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 3 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1351453660396605440

    2. 2021-01-18

    3. @SciBeh and @STWorgat the same time, I can see "average values" (say, estimated from a population) being used to make population level allocation decisions. BUT I cannot see how this could be used to *tell another individual* how much their life was worth. =>
    4. so one immediate response to that is that in expected utility theory, the standard normative framework for decision-making, utility is a *subjective quantity*, so it would ultimately be up to individuals to determine QALY values for themselves. =>
    5. Very good question. I think that economists may have something to say about that (or to answer for?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality-adjusted_life_year… QALYs are a quantitative manifestation of this AFAICT. Eugenics dressed up as cost benefit analysis? Concerning but not entirely clear.Quote Tweet
    1. 2020-11-13

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 13). RT @nicebread303: Level up @zotero with these 2 plugins: - @scite: Gives you 3 new cols: Mentioning, Supporting, Disputing (https://t.co/I… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1328008909299257346

    3. Level up @zotero with these 2 plugins: - @scite: gives you 3 new cols: Mentioning, Supporting, Disputing (https://github.com/scitedotai/scite-zotero-plugin/releases…) - @PubPeer: Gives you a col with # of Pubpeer comments (https://github.com/PubPeerFoundation/pubpeer_zotero_plugin/releases…) HT @adam42smith
    1. 2020-11-26

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 3 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1331901596863787008

    3. Replying to @SciBeh @jayvanbavel and 5 othersindeed, that is the definition I am familiar with. Tobacco/Facebook may face a choice between profits vs. lives/democracy, but that is not a moral dilemma. The reason this is important is because good-faith actors can face agonizing moral dilemmas, but here we have something else
    4. because we're all scientists, and precision matters: "Moral dilemmas, at the very least, involve conflicts between moral requirements. Consider the cases given below." https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/moral-dilemmas/… => definition of moral dilemma is a conflict between two moral imperatives
    5. By definition "A moral dilemma is a situation in which a person is torn between right and wrong." In some cases, it can include competing moral virtues (e.g., deontology vs. utilitarianism). But that needn't be the case.
    1. 2020-11-26

    2. Mike Quayle. (2020, November 26). @STWorg @SciBeh @jayvanbavel @UlliEcker @philipplenz6 @AnaSKozyreva @johnfocook ‘Well it’s not a moral dilemma!’ cry the academics as the leopard eats their faces 😜 [Tweet]. @Quayle. https://twitter.com/Quayle/status/1331918108349620230

    3. interesting idea, but I think not applicable to what was described: certain types of posts are "being demoted" not blocked... - users still have the 'freedom' to seek out that content. They are just not being preferentially *served* that content.
    4. Some might argue the moral dilemma is between choosing what is seen as good for society (limiting spread of disinformation that harms people) and allowing people freedom of choice to say and see what they want. I'm on the side of making good for society decisions.
    5. Replying to @Quayle @STWorg and 5 othersquite possibly! ;-) ...but they are invested in the idea that correct diagnosis raises the chance of successful intervention..... and, while the leopard might win on this occasion, on average that premise (which seems to me what science is all about) is likely true
    6. "Well it's not a *moral* dilemma!" cry the academics as the leopard eats their faces
    1. 2021-01-19

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 3 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1351454186811117568

    3. Replying to @SciBeh and @STWorgand, I maintain that under, say, Art.1 of the German constitution it would be illegal to do so
    4. at the same time, I can see "average values" (say, estimated from a population) being used to make population level allocation decisions. BUT I cannot see how this could be used to *tell another individual* how much their life was worth. =>
    5. Replying to @STWorgso one immediate response to that is that in expected utility theory, the standard normative framework for decision-making, utility is a *subjective quantity*, so it would ultimately be up to individuals to determine QALY values for themselves. =>
    1. 2021-01-18

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 1 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1351197475282022404

    3. alongside dubious relationships with parties that in other contexts would require declarations of interest or that have independent hallmarks of being bad faith actors
    4. indeed! I suspect also, though, that for the most egregious cases of harm caused such an inquiry will be able to identify what are clear failings by *scientific standards* - such as cherry-picked data, selective reporting, unwillingness to admit error etc...
    5. Replying to @SciBehgood question, though I think anyone who genuinely believes they are acting for the greater good should welcome a public inquiry to make their case.
    1. 2021-01-27

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 1 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1354456391772229632

    3. the rubric was developed in a hackathon from SciBeh's November 2020 conference (which you can revisit in videos and summaries here: https://scibeh.org/events/workshop2020/…) 2/3
    4. new post on Scibeh's meta-science reddit describing the new rubric for peer review of preprints aimed at broadening the pool of potential 'reviewers' so that students could provide evaluations as well! https://reddit.com/r/BehSciMeta/comments/l64y1l/reviewing_peer_review_does_the_process_need_to/… please take a look and provide feedback! 1/3
  2. Feb 2021
    1. 2021-02-04

    2. Dr Elaine Toomey on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 24 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/ElaineToomey1/status/1357343820417933316

    3. ECRs can 1) Get active - join/establish grassroots initiatives eg @ReproducibiliT @OpenSciUtrecht 2) Get vocal - use those platforms to engage w/ institutional management/ethics committees etc and 3) Get inquisitive - do research on research to find evidence-based solutions
    4. Replying to @ElaineToomey1 @johncoxnuig and 9 othersMight help. I am conducting an evaluation of the use of such a CV among researchers, panel reviewers and peer reviewers.
    5. Thanks to @jrpolanin and @ArdenClose for excellent #OpenPeerReview who made our paper so much stronger, to all participants and co-authors Ksenija Zecevic @houghtoncath @Chris_Noone_ @hopinlee @KarenMSikar
    6. 3) Institutions, funders, PIs need to review hiring/promotion/progression criteria, move away from impact factor/no. of pubs to more holistic criteria 4) Institutions, funders, PIs need to address culture of transparency across entire research cycle, not just data sharing.
    7. experience feelings of vulnerability 3) Supervisory teams + institutional research culture is very influential. Recommendations include 1) Proper training, education +resources for ECRs on how to do OS is needed, 2) PIs, supervisors need to take holistic approach to ECR training
    8. Really thrilled our #mixedmethods study on factors influencing #openscience behaviours in early career researchers #ECRS has passed peer review! We found 1) ECRs Value OS but feel they are not fully supported to practice it 2) ECRs fear visibility of potential errors and
    1. 2021-02-03

    2. IrrationalLabs. (2021, February 3). We designed an intervention that reduced shares of flagged content on TikTok by 24% via a large scale RCT, thread 👇1/7 [Tweet]. @IrrationalLabs. https://twitter.com/IrrationalLabs/status/1357033901311451140

    3. Replying to @IrrationalLabsCool! Just out of curiosity, is the accuracy content what decreases sharing or is it the fact that you have increased the difficulty to share?
    4. ooh this is actually really cool! Now when do we get to downgrade fake psychology facts
    5. Replying to @IrrationalLabs@steverathje2 there’s hope
    6. Congrats to the TikTok team for running an experiment and publishing the results publicly. The whole field benefits when we share learnings. 7/7
    7. In addition to successfully reducing shares by 24%, our intervention also reduced likes by 7%, and views by 5%. 6/7
    8. Also, we may have succeeded in slowing people down and moving them from a 'hot' to 'cold' state. The extra question may have gotten people to pause for just long enough to reconsider their actions. 5/7
    9. This intervention was inspired by previous research from @DG_Rand & @GordPennycook. People do value truth. An accuracy prompt has been shown to work because it reminds people about their own personal values of truth - at the critical point they are about to share something. 4/7
    10. We put a short prompt on videos that reminded people to think about the accuracy of the content they were watching. And then - when people went to share the video - we reminded them again that the video was flagged & asked them if they were sure they wanted to share. 3/7
    11. See article: https://techcrunch.com/2021/02/03/tiktok-to-flag-and-downrank-unsubstantiated-claims-fact-checkers-cant-verify/… 2/7
    12. We designed an intervention that reduced shares of flagged content on TikTok by 24% via a large scale RCT, thread 1/7
    1. 2021-01-12

    2. But isn’t it right that if you use age-standardised mortality which takes into account population growth and age the death rate is no higher than experienced in the 2000s?
    3. @newscientistWell, he's been aspiring to emulate a wartime prime minister. Looks like he's getting there.
    4. @newscientistHmm this is strange, what could be the cause?
    5. @newscientistYes but Dave from Dorking says its a hoax
    6. @newscientistArticle seems lightweight on the stats. Where are the graphs with 5 year average. Deaths broken out by cause of death, age etc.
    7. Boris's world beating for you.
    8. The UK has recorded the largest increase in excess deaths in the country since 1940 during the second world war https://bit.ly/3i4Y6vE
    1. 2021-01-14

    2. Extraordinary data from Scotland on excess deaths by cause and location in 2020 https://nrscotland.gov.uk/files/statistics/covid19/covid-deaths-data-week-53.xlsx… 6,686 deaths involving COVID-19 closely match 6,704 excess over 5-year average. But 570 *fewer* deaths than normal in hospitals, even with over 3,000 Covid deaths! ?????
    1. 2021-02-02

    2. Un petit livret sur les vaccins, très bien écrit par l'équipe @SciBeh, est téléchargeable ici : https://c19vax.scibeh.org/fr
    1. 2021-02-19

    2. For weeks, the public messages about vaccines have been more negative than the facts warrant. Now we are seeing the cost: A large percentage of Americans wouldn't take a vaccine if offered one.
    1. 2021-01-22

    2. Kit Yates. (2021, January 22). Is this lockdown 3.0 as tough as lockdown 1? Here are a few pieces of data from the @IndependentSage briefing which suggest that despite tackling a much more transmissible virus, lockdown is less strict, which might explain why we are only just keeping on top of cases. [Tweet]. @Kit_Yates_Maths. https://twitter.com/Kit_Yates_Maths/status/1352662085356937216

    3. Is this lockdown 3.0 as tough as lockdown 1? Here are a few pieces of data from the @IndependentSage briefing which suggest that despite tackling a much more transmissible virus, lockdown is less strict, which might explain why we are only just keeping on top of cases.
    1. 2020-12-14

    2. In fall of 2019, exactly zero scientists were studying COVID‑19, because no one knew the disease existed. The coronavirus that causes it, SARS‑CoV‑2, had only recently jumped into humans and had been neither identified nor named. But by the end of March 2020, it had spread to more than 170 countries, sickened more than 750,000 people, and triggered the biggest pivot in the history of modern science. Thousands of researchers dropped whatever intellectual puzzles had previously consumed their curiosity and began working on the pandemic instead. In mere months, science became thoroughly COVID-ized.
    3. How Science Beat the Virus
    1. 2019-12

    2. The growing body of research on interdisciplinarity has encouraged a more in depth analysis of the relations that hold among academic disciplines. In particular, the incursion of one scientific discipline into another discipline’s traditional domain, also known as scientific imperialism, has been a matter of increasing debate.
    3. Scientific Imperialism Exploring the Boundaries of Interdisciplinarity
    1. 2021-02-08

    2. And unsurprisingly, the disinformers have also been busy. But don't worry our myth-busting page is calling out the bad stuff: https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/misinfo_myths… 6/n
    3. And of course more and more facts roll in about the COVID-19 vaccines, for example real-life effectiveness (good news: it's very high!) https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/c19vaxfacts… 5/n
    4. The fraught politics of COVID-19 and vaccinations. More details on our page: https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/misinfo_politics… 4/n
    5. The cultural sensitivities surrounding vaccinations have been explored further--with an additional section on the role of religion. Good news: all major faiths support vax https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/vaxculture… 3/n
    6. Updates to public opinion about COVID-19 vaccinations: Good news, Europe has generally become more vax-positive https://hackmd.io/@scibehC19vax/publicattitudes… 2/n
    7. COVID-19 Vaccination Communication Handbook https://sks.to/c19vax : Multiple new updates to underlying wiki pages 1/n
    1. 2021-02-09

    2. Centre for Cognition, Computation, & Modelling on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 20 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/BBK_CCCM/status/1359132159953559557

    3. Interested in the latest approaches to modelling the pandemic? Want to see what digital traces tell us about the public's response? Join us Tues, 16 Feb (5pm GMT) to hear Nicola Perra (@net_science) at the Tech + Democracy Seminar Series. Register here: https://cccmseminars.com/attend
    1. 2021-02

    2. Third time is the charm. Thank you Bloomberg @business @bopinion.
    3. Apparently that's not the least of it. Now they've screwed up the correction as well. If 0.02% are diagnosed with COVID, that means 99.98%, not 92% like they claim, are COVID-free. The correction, shown below, is wrong in the story as well as in their mea culpa tweet.
    4. Two days ago, Bloomberg @business @bopinion ran a story that overstated the risk of COVID to vaccinated people by something like 400-fold. Today they're tweeting this precise piece of misinformation. Vaccine skeptics are delighted. How can a reputable news agency be so sloppy?
    1. Konstantinos, A. (2021). Tips on countering conspiracy theories and misinformaton. CommsFlyer.

    2. 2021-02-08

    3. Even though conspiracy theorieslook like they are based on arguments, people’sreasons for believingin them tend to be psychological. For example, they may feel the needfor certainty, control, belonging ormeaning. This is why facts alone can’t usuallyalter someone’s beliefs. You also need to address the feelings that push someone towards a conspiracy theory.
    4. Tips oncountering conspiracy theoriesandmisinformation
    1. 2021-02-12

    2. Dank der tollen Unterstützung von @TheRealTweetmo, Thomas Traill & Ulrike Hahn gibt es jetzt die deutsche Übersetzung des Anfang Januar erschienenen "COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook" als "Kommunikationshandbuch zum COVID-19-Impfstoff" - https://sks.to/c19vax-de #COVID-19
    1. Preprints have been growing in popularity and visibility across many disciplines and communities — all the more so during the COVID19 pandemic, with rapid publication of early research on everything from vaccine development to economic impacts. While preprints have been widely adopted in some disciplines, there are still concerns about their quality and reliability, especially when they can be readily accessed by policy-makers and the public who may not yet fully understand their limitiations. This session brings together three experts — from Africa, Latin America, and the US — to discuss the challenges and opportunities of preprints for researchers and non-researchers alike.
    2. NISO Plus 2021
    1. 2021-02-18

    2. Periodic reminder that in terms of outcomes, Swedish corona policy is thoroughly average in EU comparison – not exactly a model to be emulated by the rest of the world, nor a crime against humanity that should be prosecuted in the Hague.
    1. 2021-02-09

    2. Vaccine efficacy in blocking infection & transmission (I think) We can now estimate the (minimum) reduction in transmission from the Moderna vaccine. Thread tl;dr Moderna vaccine blocks >90% (87-93%) of infections & 91% (89-94%) of transmission. *Critiques welcome!
    1. 2021-02-10

    2. These interim recommendations apply to AZD1222 (ChAdOx1-S [recombinant]) vaccine against COVID-19 developed by Oxford University (United Kingdom) and AstraZeneca as well as to ChAdOx1-S [recombinant] vaccines against COVID-19 produced by other manufacturers that rely on the AstraZeneca core clinical data, following demonstrated equivalence in their regulatory review and once emergency use listing (EUL) has been obtained from WHO.
    3. Interim recommendations for use of the AZD1222 (ChAdOx1-S [recombinant]) vaccine against COVID-19 developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. 2021-01

    2. This report looks at attitudes towards a COVID-19 vaccine in 15 countries between November 2020 and mid-January 2021. Countries included are Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The total sample is of ~13,500 people.
    3. Covid-19:Globalattitudes towards a COVID-19 vaccine
    1. 2021-01-29

    2. Every policy has direct and indirect effects of intended and unintended consequences. Policies that require people to stay at home to reduce the morbidity and mortality from Covid-19 will have effects beyond the virus. For example, they will adversely affect mental health and economic prospects for many. They will also affect people’s willingness and ability to access health and social services. This is likely to result in increases in morbidity and mortality from otherwise curable diseases, such as cancer, acute myocardial infarction and stroke. A comparison between Covid-19 deaths prevented and excess cancer deaths caused shows it is possible that preventing Covid-19 deaths through lockdowns might result in more life-years being lost than saved.
    3. Life-Years and Lockdowns: Estimating the Effects on Covid-19 and Cancer Outcomes from the UK’s Response to the Pandemic