552 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. Your zettelkasten, having a perfect memory of your "past self" acts as a ratchet so that when you have a new conversation on a particular topic, your "present self" can quickly remember where you left off and not only advance the arguments but leave an associative trail for your "future self" to continue on again later.

      Many thoughts and associations occur when you're having conversations with any text, whether it's with something you're reading by another author or your own notes in your zettelkasten or commonplace book. For more conversations on this topic, perhaps thumb through: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%27conversations+with+the+text%27

      If you view conversations broadly as means of finding and collecting information from external sources and naturally associating them together, perhaps you'll appreciate this quote:

      No piece of information is superior to any other. Power lies in having them all on file and then finding the connections. There are always connections; you have only to want to find them.—Umberto Eco in Foucault's Pendulum (Secker & Warburg)

      (Reply to u/u/Plastic-Lettuce-7150 at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/1ae2qf4/communicating_with_a_zettelkasten/)

  2. Jan 2024
    1. After a few years at Berkeley I started to send out some of the soft-ware I had written—an instructional Pascal system, Unix utilities, anda text editor called vi (which is still, to my surprise, widely used morethan 20 years later)—to others who had similar small PDP-11 and VAXminicomputers

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    1. text in draw.io diagrams

      https://youtu.be/3Lru4k9Q55k?si=2TsGAi8iMEMunKii&t=15

      I opened the image in Youtube and then under share link I choose the start at time ootion. Please note the three tags I added. Note, once you have created the required tag of physical-computing it will auotcomplete. Also, you need to hit enter after you type in each tag, be sure to check the tags got added, as you are being graded on your ability to tag web content.

    1. Hi! My name is Mark Koester. I’m a phenomenologist and technologist. I ponder life’s fundamental questions through an on-going exploration of human experience and behavior, and I design and build “enablers” or tools (mostly digital products, books and, of course, this blog) that attempt to maximize human potential, health and creativity. I also love speaking, teaching courses, running innovation events and programs, and building product-centric companies.

      텍스트 마스터님 플레인 라이프를 배우라

  3. Dec 2023
    1. Il canto di Ulisse

      The text of the chapter used here is from the 1958 edition of Se questo è un uomo (Turin: Einaudi), the second published edition of the book, as reproduced in the edition of Levi’s complete works (Opere complete, hereafter OC) from 2016-2018, also published by Einaudi (OC I, 224-29). For this and other key works referenced or recommended, see the Bibliography page.

      The text of the chapter from the first edition of Se questo è un uomo (hereafter, SQ) from 1947 (Turin: De Silva) is also included for comparison on the Editions page of this site. This is based on the text republished in OC I, 81-86.

      As the editor of the complete works, Marco Belpoliti, explains, several manuscript versions of SQ - or its constituent parts - exist from 1946-47, as do notes for revisions leading up to the 1958 edition. On manuscripts of ‘Il canto di Ulisse’ in particular, see OC I, 1467-71.

      After 1958, although the book underwent certain further changes, for example with the addition of notes for a Schools edition (1973), or the Appendix of questions most frequently put to Levi (1976), the text of the chapter remained unchanged.

      The text of the first published English translation of this chapter, from 1959, by Stuart Woolf (London: Orion), is also available on this site on the English page.

      RG

  4. Nov 2023
    1. In contrast, media ecologists focus on understanding media as environments and how those environments affect society.

      The World Wide Web takes on an ecological identity in that it is defined by the ecology of relationships exercised within, determining the "environmental" aspects of the online world. What of media ecology and its impact on earth's ecology? There are climate change ramifications simply in the use of social media itself, yet alone the influences or behaviors associated with it: here is a carbon emissions calculator for seemingly "innocent" internet use:

    1. Thalia (Minería de textos para resaltar, agregar y vincular información en artículos) es un motor de búsqueda semántica que permite explorar 27 millones de resúmenes de PubMed. En su versión actual, es capaz de reconocer ocho tipos de entidades: 1. quimicos 2. Enfermedades 3. Drogas 4. genes 5. metabolitos 6. Proteínas 7. Especies 8. Entidades anatómicas

      PubMed

    1. Studs Terkel, the oral historian, was known to admonish friends who would read his books but leave them free of markings. He told them that reading a book should not be a passive exercise, but rather a raucous conversation.

      love "raucous conversation"!

  5. Oct 2023
    1. Xie et al. [22] proposed a text transfer frameworkcalled DeepSC based on the Transformer [23], which canrecover the meaning of sentences through semantic informa-tion, thus minimizing semantic errors during transmission.

      SemCom for text transferring.

  6. Sep 2023
    1. t may be that in using his system hedeveloped his mind and his knowledge of history to the point wherehe expected his readers to draw more inferences from the facts heselected than most modern readers are accustomed to doing, in thisday of the predigested book.

      It's possible that the process of note taking and excerpting may impose levels of analysis and synthesis on their users such that when writing and synthesizing their works that they more subtly expect their readers to do the same thing when their audiences may require more handholding and explanation.

      Here, both the authors' experiences and that of the cultures in which they're writing will determine the relationship.


      There's lots of analogies between thinking and digesting (rumination, consumption, etc), in reading and understanding contexts.

      Source: https://hypothes.is/a/hhCGsljeEe2QlccJUQ55fA

    1. Watch: Moment Ukrainian missile hits Russia's Black Sea fleet HQ

      images on bbc.com have meaningful alt text descriptions that convey the content or function of the images. This means content should be available in different formats to accommodate various disabilities.

    2. 观看:乌克兰导弹击中俄罗斯黑海舰队总部的瞬间

      images on bbc.com have meaningful alt text descriptions that convey the content or function of the images. This means content should be available in different formats to accommodate various disabilities.

  7. Aug 2023
    1. T9 (text prediction):generative AI::handgun:machine gun

      Link to: https://hypothes.is/a/n6wXvkeNEe6DOFexaCD-Qg

    2. Some may not realize it yet, but the shift in technology represented by ChatGPT is just another small evolution in the chain of predictive text with the realms of information theory and corpus linguistics.

      Claude Shannon's work along with Warren Weaver's introduction in The Mathematical Theory of Communication (1948), shows some of the predictive structure of written communication. This is potentially better underlined for the non-mathematician in John R. Pierce's book An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise (1961) in which discusses how one can do a basic analysis of written English to discover that "e" is the most prolific letter or to predict which letters are more likely to come after other letters. The mathematical structures have interesting consequences like the fact that crossword puzzles are only possible because of the repetitive nature of the English language or that one can use the editor's notation "TK" (usually meaning facts or date To Come) in writing their papers to make it easy to find missing information prior to publication because the statistical existence of the letter combination T followed by K is exceptionally rare and the only appearances of it in long documents are almost assuredly areas which need to be double checked for data or accuracy.

      Cell phone manufacturers took advantage of the lower levels of this mathematical predictability to create T9 predictive text in early mobile phone technology. This functionality is still used in current cell phones to help speed up our texting abilities. The difference between then and now is that almost everyone takes the predictive magic for granted.

      As anyone with "fat fingers" can attest, your phone doesn't always type out exactly what you mean which can result in autocorrect mistakes (see: DYAC (Damn You AutoCorrect)) of varying levels of frustration or hilarity. This means that when texting, one needs to carefully double check their work before sending their text or social media posts or risk sending their messages to Grand Master Flash instead of Grandma.

      The evolution in technology effected by larger amounts of storage, faster processing speeds, and more text to study means that we've gone beyond the level of predicting a single word or two ahead of what you intend to text, but now we're predicting whole sentences and even paragraphs which make sense within a context. ChatGPT means that one can generate whole sections of text which will likely make some sense.

      Sadly, as we know from our T9 experience, this massive jump in predictability doesn't mean that ChatGPT or other predictive artificial intelligence tools are "magically" correct! In fact, quite often they're wrong or will predict nonsense, a phenomenon known as AI hallucination. Just as with T9, we need to take even more time and effort to not only spell check the outputs from the machine, but now we may need to check for the appropriateness of style as well as factual substance!

      The bigger near-term problem is one of human understanding and human communication. While the machine may appear to magically communicate (often on our behalf if we're publishing it's words under our names), is it relaying actual meaning? Is the other person reading these words understanding what was meant to have been communicated? Do the words create knowledge? Insight?

      We need to recall that Claude Shannon specifically carved semantics and meaning out of the picture in the second paragraph of his seminal paper:

      Frequently the messages have meaning; that is they refer to or are correlated according to some system with certain physical or conceptual entities. These semantic aspects of communication are irrelevant to the engineering problem.

      So far ChatGPT seems to be accomplishing magic by solving a small part of an engineering problem by being able to explore the adjacent possible. It is far from solving the human semantic problem much less the un-adjacent possibilities (potentially representing wisdom or insight), and we need to take care to be aware of that portion of the unsolved problem. Generative AIs are also just choosing weighted probabilities and spitting out something which is prone to seem possible, but they're not optimizing for which of many potential probabilities is the "best" or the "correct" one. For that, we still need our humanity and faculties for decision making.


      Shannon, Claude E. A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Bell System Technical Journal, 1948.

      Shannon, Claude E., and Warren Weaver. The Mathematical Theory of Communication. University of Illinois Press, 1949.

      Pierce, John Robinson. An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise. Second, Revised. Dover Books on Mathematics. 1961. Reprint, Mineola, N.Y: Dover Publications, Inc., 1980. https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Information-Theory-Symbols-Mathematics/dp/0486240614.

      Shannon, Claude Elwood. “The Bandwagon.” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 2, no. 1 (March 1956): 3. https://doi.org/10.1109/TIT.1956.1056774.


      We may also need to explore The Bandwagon, an early effect which Shannon noticed and commented upon. Everyone seems to be piling on the AI bandwagon right now...

    1. Texts are patient conversationalists always waiting for you to write your side of the conversation into the margin before they continue on with their side of the conversation. Sadly, too many readers (students especially) don't realize that there's a conversation going on.

      Link to:<br /> - https://hypothes.is/a/bBwyhkN3Ee6nQNPI5xmSnQ - https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q

    2. Margins in books and on paper are blank spaces for "dark ideas" asking to be filled in while "reading with a pen in hand" so that the reader can have a conversation with the text.

      Link to https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q on dark ideas

  8. Jul 2023
    1. I would say it's text when interpreted as text/plain it's human readable. Otherwise it's binary. That is, binary = for machines only.
    2. the subversion FAQ http://subversion.tigris.org/faq.html#binary-files has = " ... if any of the bytes are zero, or if more than 15% are not ASCII printing characters, then Subversion calls the file binary. This heuristic might be improved in the future, however."
    3. I couldn't find a definition of text except that text means absence of binary data. This is weak - so I would follow your definition - A text file is a file which can be read by a human.
    4. The distinction doesn't refer to the files _contents_ but how to the file is _treated_ when it is being read or written. In "rb"/"wb" modes files are left how they are, in "r"/"w" modes Windows programmers get line ends "\r\n" translated into "\n" what disturbs file positions and string lengths.
    5. Dividing files into "text" and "binary" is the archetype misdesign in the operating system you use
  9. Jun 2023
    1. rinchiuso

      In the Schools edition of SQ, Levi glosses his own chapter ending as follows: ‘Il verso, che chiude il Canto di Ulisse col tragico naufragio in vista del Monte del Purgatorio, chiude anche un altro “folle volo”, e cioè la breve parentesi umana, lo sforzo dell’autore e di Pikolo di sollevarsi per un momento al di sopra dell’orizzonte desolato della prigionia’ (OC I, 1418).

      RG

    2. il perché

      Levi wrote some brief explanatory notes of his own for a Schools edition of SQ, published by Einaudi in 1973. Most of these are linguistic, translating foreign words and phrases, or simply explanatory. The note here to ‘il perché’ has more substance, but has also been treated tentatively by critics, as it seems somewhat partial or incomplete as an explanation of this remarkable, climactic moment. Levi writes: ‘In quell’istante, all’autore pare di intravvedere una conturbante analogia fra naufragio di Ulisse e il destino dei prigionieri: l’uno e gli altri sono stati paradossalmente “puniti”, Ulisse per aver infranto le barriere della tradizione, i prigionieri perché hanno osato opporsi a una forza soverchiante, qual era allora l’ordine fascista in Europa. Ancora: fra le varie radici dell’antisemitismo tedesco, e quindi del Lager, c’era l’odio e il timore per l’“acutezza” intellettuale dell’ebraismo europeo, che i due giovani sentono simile a quella dei compagni di Ulisse, e di cui in quel momento si riconoscono rappresentanti ed eredi’ (OC I, 1417-18).

      RG

  10. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. The problem with that presumption is that people are alltoo willing to lower standards in order to make the purported newcomer appear smart. Justas people are willing to bend over backwards and make themselves stupid in order tomake an AI interface appear smart

      AI has recently become such a big thing in our lives today. For a while I was seeing chatgpt and snapchat AI all over the media. I feel like people ask these sites stupid questions that they already know the answer too because they don't want to take a few minutes to think about the answer. I found a website stating how many people use AI and not surprisingly, it shows that 27% of Americans say they use it several times a day. I can't imagine how many people use it per year.

    1. Second, the social life of annotation is of greater importance than individual reader response. Annotation must be studied and promoted as a social endeavor that is co-authored by groups of annotators, with interactive media, spanning on-the-ground and online settings, and in response to shared commitments.

      When will we get the civil disobedience version of Mortimer J. Adler's How to Mark a Book?

    1. Il canto di Ulisse

      The text of the chapter used here is from the 1958 edition of Se questo è un uomo (Turin: Einaudi), the second published edition of the book, as reproduced in the edition of Levi’s complete works (Opere complete, hereafter OC) from 2016-2018, also published by Einaudi (OC I, 224-29). For this and other key works referenced or recommended, see the Bibliography page.

      The text of the chapter from the first edition of Se questo è un uomo (hereafter, SQ) from 1947 (Turin: De Silva) is also included for comparison on the Variants page of this site. This is based on the text republished in OC I, 81-86.

      As the editor of the complete works, Marco Belpoliti, explains, several manuscript versions of SQ - or its constituent parts - exist from 1946-47, as do notes for revisions leading up to the 1958 edition. On manuscripts of ‘Il canto di Ulisse’ in particular, see OC I, 1467-71.

      After 1958, although the book underwent certain further changes, for example with the addition of notes for a Schools edition (1973), or the Appendix of questions most frequently put to Levi (1976), the text of the chapter remained unchanged.

      The text of the first published English translation of this chapter, from 1959, by Stuart Woolf (London: Orion), is also available on this site on the English page.

      RG

    2. rinchiuso

      In the Schools edition of SQ, Levi glosses his own chapter ending as follows: ‘Il verso, che chiude il Canto di Ulisse col tragico naufragio in vista del Monte del Purgatorio, chiude anche un altro “folle volo”, e cioè la breve parentesi umana, lo sforzo dell’autore e di Pikolo di sollevarsi per un momento al di sopra dell’orizzonte desolato della prigionia’ (OC I, 1418).

      RG

    3. il perché

      Levi wrote some brief explanatory notes of his own for a Schools edition of SQ, published by Einaudi in 1973. Most of these are linguistic, translating foreign words and phrases, or simply explanatory. The note here to ‘il perché’ has more substance, but has also been treated tentatively by critics, as it seems somewhat partial or incomplete as an explanation of this remarkable, climactic moment. Levi writes: ‘In quell’istante, all’autore pare di intravvedere una conturbante analogia fra naufragio di Ulisse e il destino dei prigionieri: l’uno e gli altri sono stati paradossalmente “puniti”, Ulisse per aver infranto le barriere della tradizione, i prigionieri perché hanno osato opporsi a una forza soverchiante, qual era allora l’ordine fascista in Europa. Ancora: fra le varie radici dell’antisemitismo tedesco, e quindi del Lager, c’era l’odio e il timore per l’“acutezza” intellettuale dell’ebraismo europeo, che i due giovani sentono simile a quella dei compagni di Ulisse, e di cui in quel momento si riconoscono rappresentanti ed eredi’ (OC I, 1417-18).

      RG

    4. Il canto di Ulisse

      The text of the chapter used here is from the 1958 edition of Se questo è un uomo (Turin: Einaudi), the second published edition of the book, as reproduced in the edition of Levi’s complete works (Opere complete, hereafter OC) from 2016-2018, also published by Einaudi (OC I, 224-29). For this and other key works referenced or recommended, see the Bibliography section.

      The text of the chapter from the first edition of Se questo è un uomo (hereafter, SQ) from 1947 (Turin: De Silva) is also included for comparison on the Genetics page of this site. This is based on the text republished in OC I, 81-86.

      As the editor of the complete works, Marco Belpoliti, explains, several manuscript versions of SQ - or its constituent parts - exist from 1946-47, as do notes for revisions leading up to the 1958 edition. On manuscripts of ‘Il canto di Ulisse’ in particular, see OC I, 1467-71.

      After 1958, although the book underwent certain further changes, for example with the addition of notes for a Schools edition (1973), or the Appendix of questions most frequently put to Levi (1976), the text of the chapter remained unchanged.

      The text of the first published English translation of this chapter, from 1959, by Stuart Woolf (London: Orion), is also available on this site on the Translation Lab page.

      RG

  11. May 2023
    1. You will talk with people from hundreds and thousands of years ago from places and ways of life that are long gone or are simply impossible for you to know any other way. And this is not just a cheap alternative to traveling – this is how you become more human.

      Example of a teacher talking about the great conversation in the framing of the humanities....

    1. Login New Window Support Compliance Free Audit

      Good colour scheme that illustrates high contrast text. Low-contrast text is a common accessibility issue on many websites, poor contrast makes it harder for certain users to identify the text, edges, and shapes of several components.

    1. Within the pantheon of types of notes there are: - paraphrasing notes, which one can use to summarize ideas for later recall and review as well as to check one's own knowledge and understanding of what an author has said. - commentary notes, which take the text and create a commentary on them, often as part of having a conversation with the text. These can be seen historically in the Midrashim tradition of commenting on Torah.

      [23:12 - 24:47]


      separately also: - productivity notes - to do lists, reminders of work to be done, often within or as part of a larger complex project

    1. Not everyone values marginalia, said Paul Ruxin, a member of the Caxton Club. “If you think about the traditional view that the book is only about the text,” he said, “then this is kind of foolish, I suppose.”

      A book can't only be about the text, it has to be about the reader's interaction with it and thoughts about it. Without these, the object has no value.

      Annotations are the traces left behind of how one valued a book as they read and interacted with it.

  12. Apr 2023
    1. If Parvana lost track of hermother, she was afraid she'd never find her again

      This is sad, a child has a fear to lose her mother because all women on the street are wearing the same cloth

    1. Oakeshott saw educationas part of the ‘conversation of mankind’, wherein teachers induct their studentsinto that conversation by teaching them how to participate in the dialogue—howto hear the ‘voices’ of previous generations while cultivating their own uniquevoices.

      How did Michael Oakeshott's philosophy overlap with the idea of the 'Great Conversation' or 20th century movement of Adler's Great Books of the Western World.

      How does it influence the idea of "having conversations with the text" in the annotation space?

    1. Animating text

      Animating your text gives you more control over your audience's attention. You can easily move around graphics, but if the moving object is text you want your audience to read, they will follow along to gather the information within the text. It is important not too move your text around too much as this can also be a double edged sword.

    1. Extending the life of electronic products and re-using electrical components brings an even larger economic benefit, as working devices are certainly worth more than the materials they contain. A circular electronics system - one in which resources are not extracted, used and wasted, but re-used in countless ways - creates decent, sustainable jobs and retains more value in the industry.

      This paragraph caught my attention for several reasons. The first is that it was one of the first paragraphs that I actually understood what it was saying. Additionally, it made me feel like I could do something about it. When it said that reusing electrical components are better, it helped me see a clear way that I can direct effect this. Finally, I thought this paragraph was interesting because it talked about creating jobs. This is important to note because more and more people are going to school for something involving technology. This creates jobs for that specific group of people.

  13. Mar 2023
    1. things to do to understand text:

      • visualize single texts
      • measure features of text
      • identify distinctive words
      • find or organize works
      • model literay forms
      • model social boundaries
      • unsupervised modeling
    1. With respect to the predictive text portion of ChatGPT, a good non-technical (non-mathematical) description of a related mathematical model is described in chapter 3 of:

      Pierce, John Robinson. An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise. Second, Revised. Dover Books on Mathematics. 1961. Reprint, Mineola, N.Y: Dover Publications, Inc., 1980. https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Information-Theory-Symbols-Mathematics/dp/0486240614.

  14. Feb 2023
    1. I also use: qrun (for running notes, Standard Operating Procedures), qlog (for logs of activities on projects, journal entries), qtalk (for lectures), qbug (for bugs, things to fix or tweak, etc.),… You get the idea. Adapted this from Merlin Mann’s “runx” convention, but moved the odd character to the front to take advantage of autocompletion.)
    1. “How to Write a Thesis,” then, isn’t just about fulfilling a degree requirement. It’s also about engaging difference and attempting a project that is seemingly impossible, humbly reckoning with “the knowledge that anyone can teach us something.” It models a kind of self-actualization, a belief in the integrity of one’s own voice.
    1. Wordcraft Writers Workshop by Andy Coenen - PAIR, Daphne Ippolito - Brain Research Ann Yuan - PAIR, Sehmon Burnam - Magenta

      cross reference: ChatGPT

    2. In addition to specific operations such as rewriting, there are also controls for elaboration and continutation. The user can even ask Wordcraft to perform arbitrary tasks, such as "describe the gold earring" or "tell me why the dog was trying to climb the tree", a control we call freeform prompting. And, because sometimes knowing what to ask is the hardest part, the user can ask Wordcraft to generate these freeform prompts and then use them to generate text. We've also integrated a chatbot feature into the app to enable unstructured conversation about the story being written. This way, Wordcraft becomes both an editor and creative partner for the writer, opening up new and exciting creative workflows.

      The interface of Wordcraft sounds like some of that interface that note takers and thinkers in the tools for thought space would appreciate in their

      Rather than pairing it with artificial intelligence and prompts for specific writing tasks, one might pair tools for though interfaces with specific thinking tasks related to elaboration and continuation. Examples of these might be gleaned from lists like Project Zero's thinking routines: https://pz.harvard.edu/thinking-routines

    3. The application is powered by LaMDA, one of the latest generation of large language models. At its core, LaMDA is a simple machine — it's trained to predict the most likely next word given a textual prompt. But because the model is so large and has been trained on a massive amount of text, it's able to learn higher-level concepts.

      Is LaMDA really able to "learn higher-level concepts" or is it just a large, straight-forward information theoretic-based prediction engine?

    4. Our team at Google Research built Wordcraft, an AI-powered text editor centered on story writing, to see how far we could push the limits of this technology.
  15. Jan 2023
    1. All that remained was the small matter of actually writing the chapter. I don’t do this in Obsidian: I think it would be asking for trouble to mix notes and their end-products in the same place.

      I've not seen this explicitly laid out as advice before though in most contexts people's note taking spaces have historically been divorced from their writing spaces for publication because slips and notes are usually kept physically separate from the working spaces or finished parts, but Richard Carter specifically separates the digital spaces in which he takes his notes and then uses them for creating end products. While he could both take notes in Obsidian, his tool of choice for notes, as well as write his finished pieces there, he actively changes contexts to use a different digital app to compose his notes into final pieces.

      What affordances does this context shift provide? <br /> - blank slate may encourage reworking and expansion of original notes - is there a blank slate effect and what would it entail? - potentially moves the piece into a longer format space or tool which provides additional writing, formatting or other affordances (which? there don't seem to be any in this case aside from a potential "distraction free mode" which may tend to force one to focus only on the piece at hand rather than the thousands of other pieces (notes) hiding within the app)

      What affordances does this remove?<br /> - He's forced to repeat himself (cut & paste / DRY violation)

      Is it easier or harder (from a time/effort perspective) to provide citations with such a workflow? Carter does indicate that for him:

      Having links to original sources in my outline makes the compilation of references for the chapter far easier than it used to be.

    1. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2023/01/18/1139783203/what-makes-songs-swing-physicists-unravel-jazz-mystery

      Spaces in both language, text, and music help to create the texture of what is being communicated (and/or not).


      Link to Edward Tufte's latest book in section entitled "Spacing enhances complex meaning, encourages slow, thoughtful reading":

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>KevinMarks</span> in #meta 2023-01-19 (<time class='dt-published'>01/19/2023 11:32:19</time>)</cite></small>


      Link to Indigenous astronomy example of negative spaces (like the Great Emu)

    1. Hints for Preparing Documents Most documents go through several versions (always more than you expected) before they are finally finished. Accordingly, you should do whatever possible to make the job of changing them easy. First, when you do the purely mechanical operations of typing, type so subsequent editing will be easy. Start each sentence on a new line. Make lines short, and break lines at natural places, such as after commas and semicolons, rather than randomly. Since most people change documents by rewriting phrases and adding, deleting and rearranging sentences, these precautions simplify any editing you have to do later. — Brian W. Kernighan, 1974

      —Brian W. Kernighan, 1974 “UNIX for Beginners” [PDF] as Bell Labs Technical Memorandum 74-1273-18 on 29 October 1974.

      For easier editing and reuse of sentences, or even portions of lines of text, one can (and should) write sentences or sentence fragments on their own lines in digital contexts.

      This way future edits or the ability to more easily cut and paste will far easier in addition to keeping your version control files simpler and easier to read and visually track your changes. (That is in many version control systems, instead of a change appearing to affect an entire paragraph, it will only show on the single line that was changed thereby making the change easier to see.)

      This particular affordance may be a particularly useful one for note takers who expect to regularly reuse their notes in other contexts. Many forms of software (including Tex, LaTeX, and even markdown) will autowrap newlines so that a sentence broken up into clauses on multiple lines will properly wrap back into a proper looking single line when printed. Take care that in many Markdown versions adding two spaces at the end of a line will automatically create a newline in your text.

  16. Dec 2022
    1. 4NO POSTING OR UPLOADING VIDEOS OF ANY KINDTo protect the quality of our group & prevent members from being solicited products & services - we don't allow any videos because we can't monitor what's being said word for word. Written post only.

      annotation meta: may need new tag: - can't effectively monitor

    1. Duolingo or whatever French and I had this idea well basically what it reminds me of is Stefan's Vig the Austrian

      https://youtu.be/r9idbh-U2kM?t=3544

      Stefan Zweig (reference? his memoir?) apparently suggested that students translate authors as a means of becoming more intimately acquainted with their work. This is similar to restating an author in one's own words as a means of improving one's understanding. It's a lower level of processing that osculates on the idea of having a conversation with a text.

      tk: track this reference down. appropriate context?

  17. Nov 2022
  18. learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. Edgar Allan Poe, who wrote in 1844, “In the marginalia, too, we talkonly to ourselves; we therefore talk freshly — boldly — originally — with abandonnement— without conceit.”1

      Poe, E. A. (1844). Marginalia. United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 15, 484, https://www.eapoe.org/works/misc/mar1144.htm

      Curious that Poe framed marginalia as a self-conversation rather than a conversation with the text itself...

    1. first we're looking for the "main" object. The word "main" is used in lots of places in Ruby, so that will be hard to track down. How else can we search?Luckily, we know that if you print out that object, it says "main". Which means we should be able to find the string "main", quotes and all, in C.
    1. js const { generateFragment } = await import('https://unpkg.com/text-fragments-polyfill/dist/fragment-generation-utils.js'); const result = generateFragment(window.getSelection()); if (result.status === 0) { let url = `${location.origin}${location.pathname}${location.search}`; const fragment = result.fragment; const prefix = fragment.prefix ? `${encodeURIComponent(fragment.prefix)}-,` : ''; const suffix = fragment.suffix ? `,-${encodeURIComponent(fragment.suffix)}` : ''; const textStart = encodeURIComponent(fragment.textStart); const textEnd = fragment.textEnd ? `,${encodeURIComponent(fragment.textEnd)}` : ''; url += `#:~:text=${prefix}${textStart}${textEnd}${suffix}`; console.log(url); }

    1. https://medium.com/@ben_fry/tracing-the-origin-65011dc20877

      Could be interesting to apply this sort of process to a variety of texts over time. A draft of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein comes to mind.


      How to view this through the lens of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions? particularly as this was the evolution of an idea by the same author over time...

    2. Fifty years ago, coinciding with the centennial of the release of Darwin’s manuscript, author Morse Peckham collected all six editions into a single “variorum” text. Peckham painstakingly created a reference system that denotes the modifications and changes between editions. The text was created by Peckham’s careful enumeration of every sentence from every edition, copied onto index cards; from these cards, he carefully assembled them into a final text.
    1. Another Authotkey user here! 😃 On my machine, Mehul's solution with the 1ms delay takes noticeably longer to actually insert some text. I found the following solution which inserts it in a less "chunky" manner. Adjust the 1ms till it works for your setup :) ; This worked ::dx::{Sleep 1}DevExpress ; For longer hotstrings, I needed more ::azerty::{Sleep 60}DevExpress With 250ms pretty much any length of hotstring expanded correctly. I answered this Stackoverflow question with details from this issue. The same bug might have been present in an earlier version of VSCode: microsoft/vscode#1934 They make mention of this commit fixing it. Unfortunately it's a rather large commit :( microsoft/vscode@a1bd50f Commit msg: "Fixes #1168: Read synchronously from textarea" The problem has to do with the backspace remapping. Take the following autohotkey hotstring: ::tada::🎉 This will make typing "tada" followed by one of the "EndingChars" (space, tab, comma, dot, ...) expand to the 🎉 emoji. What you see visually happening on the screen is that Autohotkey does this by first sending a backspace to the editor 4 times (length of hotstring "tada") and then inserts the replacement text (🎉) What happens when this (pretty fantastic) extension is active is that the first x characters get deleted then the replacement text gets inserted and then the remaining (hotstring length - x) characters get deleted. But because the cursor is now at the end of the replacement text... which gets chewed on 😃 I'll have to learn how to debug the IDE itself or always add a {Sleep 250} to my hotstrings...

      Solution to AutoHotkey text replacement bug. Just add sleep parameter. Adding {Sleep 250} should generally work

    2. Page that has some guidance on troubleshooting AutoHotkey issues in VS Code.

    1. That is to make notes about the shape of the discussion-the discussion that is engaged in by all of the authors,even if unbeknownst to them. For reasons that will becomeclear in Part Four, we prefer to call such notes dialectical.

      Dialectical notes are made at the level of syntopical reading and entail creating a conversation not only between the reader and the author, but create a conversation of questions and answers between and among many texts and the reader.

    2. Marking a book is literally an expression of your differences or your agreements with the author. It is the highest respect you can pay him.
    3. Reading a book should be a conversation between you andthe author.
  19. Oct 2022
    1. https://www.explainpaper.com/

      Another in a growing line of research tools for processing and making sense of research literature including Research Rabbit, Connected Papers, Semantic Scholar, etc.

      Functionality includes the ability to highlight sections of research papers with natural language processing to explain what those sections mean. There's also a "chat" that allows you to ask questions about the paper which will attempt to return reasonable answers, which is an artificial intelligence sort of means of having an artificial "conversation with the text".

      cc: @dwhly @remikalir @jeremydean

    1. I’m excited to see community efforts like Obsidian Ava
    2. The sentence in italics above was not written by me. It was autocompleted as I wrote in Obsidian, using the Text Generator plugin.
    3. In some ways it is surprising that filtering text is so technically challenging. Text seems like it would be easier to manipulate than images.
    1. For her online book clubs, Maggie Delano defines four broad types of notes as a template for users to have a common language: - terms - propositions (arguments, claims) - questions - sources (references which support the above three types)

      I'm fairly sure in a separate context, I've heard that these were broadly lifted from her reading of Mortimer J. Adler's How to Read a book. (reference? an early session of Dan Allosso's Obsidian Book club?)

      These become the backbone of breaking down a book and using them to have a conversation with the author.

    1. In at least one other published version the first two items on this list are not peacock fans and Japanese screens but “ormolu garden gates, handleless cups”. The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories, ed. Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert

      Ormolu is the gilding technique of applying finely ground, high-carat gold–mercury amalgam to an object of bronze, and for objects finished in this way. The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold coating. The French refer to this technique as "bronze doré"; in English, it is known as "gilt bronze". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ormolu?wprov=sfti1

    2. peacock fans, Japanese screens,

      In at least one other published version the first two items on this list are not peacock fans and Japanese screens but “ormolu garden gates, handleless cups”. The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories, ed. Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert

      Ormolu is the gilding technique of applying finely ground, high-carat gold–mercury amalgam to an object of bronze, and for objects finished in this way. The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold coating. The French refer to this technique as "bronze doré"; in English, it is known as "gilt bronze". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ormolu?wprov=sfti1

    1. Writing4ever_3

      Even if your raw typing is 60+ wpm, it doesn't help if you're actively composing at the same time. If the words and ideas come to you at that speed and you can get it out, great, but otherwise focus on what you can do in 15 minute increments to get the ideas onto the page. If typing is holding you back, write by hand or try a tape recorder or voice to text software.

    1. certainly surrounding oneself with acircle of people who will listen and t a l k - - a n d at times theyhave to be imaginary characters--is one of them

      Intellectual work requires "surfaces" to work against, almost as an exact analogy to substrates in chemistry which help to catalyze reactions. The surfaces may include: - articles, books, or other writing against which one can think and write - colleagues, friends, family, other thinkers, or even imaginary characters (as suggested by C. Wright Mills) - one's past self as instantiated by their (imperfect) memory or by their notes about excerpted ideas or their own thoughts


      Are there any other surfaces we're missing?

    2. Merely to name an item of experience often invitesus to explain it; the mere taking of a note from a book isoften a prod to reflection.
  20. Sep 2022
    1. But having a conversation partner in your topic is actually ideal!

      What's the solution: dig into your primary sources. Ask open-ended questions, and refine them as you go. Be open to new lines of inquiry. Stage your work in Conversation with so-and-so [ previously defined as the author of the text].

      Stacy Fahrenthold recommends digging into primary sources and using them (and their author(s) as a "conversation partner". She doesn't mention using either one's memory or one's notes as a communication partner the way Luhmann does in "Kommunikation mit Zettelkästen" (1981), which can be an incredibly fruitful and creative method for original material.

      http://luhmann.surge.sh/communicating-with-slip-boxes

  21. Aug 2022
    1. Ballpoint pens are not tools for marking books, and felt-tip highlighters should be prohibited altogether.

      How is one to have an intimate conversation with a text if their annotations are not written in the margins? Placing your initial notes somewhere else is like having sex with your clothes on.

      syndication link