141 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. Stalking Cat is open to the idea of a relationship, especially with a cat girl by far, which may exist but they haven't met them. It requires a very deep bond, and it's difficult to deny that bond to a given animal, so I imagine it might be difficult to sustain a non cat-cat relationship.

      There's also the issue of not having enough time to sustain a relationship, as much time is spent pursuing body modifications.

    2. Going back a few generations, apparently what Stalking Cat is doing was a "fairly common thing" in the Huron (may've misspelled that) tribe, according to a professor of Native American Studies.

    3. There is some surprise from the general public about how intelligent and articulate members of the animal-style body mod community (and furry fandom) are, concerning their weirdness and animalistic tendencies. Stalking Cat has a degree in electronics engineering.

      In addition, Stalking Cat's work is specialised enough that they have a solid position in their employment field, and isn't worried in that regard. Adding onto that, Stalking Cat is quite introverted, and in their day-to-day life, and Cat really doesn't give a shit, despite their empathy. It was something they had to do, and Cat knows you may feel some way about that, but it's irrelevant. (Without being so brash in words.)

    4. Stalking Cat has experienced behavioral changes in the vein of no longer drinkin' and druggin', heightened empathy, and reacting to certain things in different ways. By no longer denying these feelings, it's been easier to deal with different situations.

      Reacts to things in a more "natural cat" way than anything else. Very cat-like in actions. (Lynx -> Tiger for e-mail address.)-> general feline affinity, but focus on tiger because it's the largest non-extinct cat on this continent.

      Feline affinity is more great with big cats than smaller, domestic cats. (Primal nature? Bow hunting (Indian tradition) deer. Mutual respect with cats, 10' near bobcat, 25' near mountain lion, leaves when known hunting territory for another animal.) If you're not bow-hunting, and using a gun, you don't deserve that kill, basically. Gun hunting separates people from the experience of hunting. Stalking Cat is very much a cat in hunting & associated mannerisms.

    5. If the resources are available, Stalking Cat plans (planned?) to extend their body modification not just to the face, but tails, claws, feet (paws) everything, but it's an expensive and time-consuming process.

    6. As Shannon Larratt is interviewing Stalking Cat, he brings up a point that's quite interesting to me, and entirely relevant to the idea of privacy and unwanted celebrity we discussed earlier in this course.

      SL: "... uh you do- you do go to a fair number of tattoo conventions, and you must experience at least a minor celebrity status while you're there."

      SC: "Well, you know, in fact, I've only been to a couple conventions-"

      SL: "I guess- I guess it's just every one you go to, they will always photo you."

      SC: "Right, and my pictures have been plastered all over the place, and uh, it, in a way kind of irritates me, because these people're making money off of something I've spent a great deal of time doing, and I haven't gotten a dime out of it."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "But uh, and uh, and they're basically using my picture to get themselves famous."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "Or to get publicised."

      SL: "Yeah."

      SC: "But again, I did this for me, not for other people."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      There's also been a positive side to this, as it encouraged self-expression amongst the public, and while not exactly normalising it, it allowed people who needed to do stuff like this to accept it and go for it. (But not those who are doing it as a trend.)

    7. Interesting story behind feline dentures, how the dentist refused to do them when they were healthy, but when Stalking Cat destroyed their teeth from years of drinkin' and druggin' (their words, not mine), the dentist agreed to sculpt feline teeth-style dentures.

      I'm surprised it doesn't affect Cat's speech (much).

    8. Stalking Cat spent a lot of time self-medicating with drugs and alcohol trying to deny their empathy and their connection to different animals, especially cats. Trying to subdue and deny these feelings didn't work very well, but living as a cat counteracted these negative feelings.

    9. Stalking Cat has had/coexisted with a variety of animals, including reptiles, wolves, snakes, birds, fish, and horses. Despite Stalking Cat's feline identity, they don't clash with dogs or wolves in a stereotypical fashion.

      Maintains a general connection to animals, tied to both their experiences as an Indian, and tied to their identity as an animal themselves.

    10. Being 1/2 Indian (Native American) & 1/2 White was a very big culture shock to Stalking Cat, as they fought with both the Indians & the Whites for being partially the other race. Stalking Cat accepted the cat/tigress as their spirit animal, which was originally pointed out by the medicine man of Cat's tribe.

      Has many tattoos, started with aquatic animals and moved onto cat-type tattoos.

    1. The dominion of man over animal that this naming manifests thus comes before original sin and the Fall,6

      There's the argument about whether man's dominion over animals signifies man's power over animals to do as he pleases, or whether it means a responsibility to protect & nurture these animals. This is explored within the context of vegetarianism/veganism as a moral quandary for Christians.

    2. Balancing out difficulties with human communication, Grandin has recently popular- ized the notion that ASDs can produce a special understanding of animal consciousness and contribute to enhanced interspecies communication.

      Those with Autism Spectrum Disorders can logically break down human interaction, but are woefully unable to replicate it in the moment. This can also be applied to interspecies interactions.

    3. The disappearance of other species with whom the lives of humans were formerly intertwined increasingly impoverishes our worlds. We lack what Lingis would consider essential emotional teachers. We know our pets. We know zoos; nature films; anthropomorphic fiction, film, and art; toys; cartoons

      With such a lack of animals in our lives, we use our imagination as children when it comes to animals we do not know. Kids love dinosaurs and big cats. I've only seen a snow leopard once, at a zoo, but they are beautiful creatures, and that's why I have a connection to them. Humans take up the world's prime real estate, killing off thousands of species and shoving the world's animals to the sidelines. It's quite depressing, really, the homogenization of the world.

    4. Only three interview subjects talked to me about their own erotic investment in the fandom, but I suspect that many others were more interested in having fun at FWA than in talk- ing to me about their sex lives. Although my official escort soon left me to proceed on my own, a few people approached me between interviews to make sure I was not up to anything objectionable. The most interesting of these was a graduate student in performance studies whom I met only in full fursuit and who checked my credentials with his major professor, an old friend of mine. I hope that this young scholar and amazing fur-suit dancer - he won the contest - will write about the fandom

      There's a pervading distrust of reporters/outsiders at furry conventions. For a group that had their convention gassed (Midwest FurFest 2014), and regularly puts up with death threats of the internet and in real life, I wouldn't consider their scaredy-cat (forgive the pun) behavior all that surprising

    5. This encounter then came to mind during a smaller conference the following spring when Tony Kubiak spoke of the recent creation of a chimeric human-cat protein intended to block allergic reactions (in humans).6

      Genetic manipulation has been a running gag/ideal within the furry community for as long as it has existed. The idea of transformation by any means possible is appealing, and these sorts of genetic components would go a long way in establishing that sense of identity.

    6. Because expenses and dynamics became unworkable for this interesting household, Cat was asked to move out later that summer. A

      That's a damn shame, to be honest. Stalking Cat was happy in that co-dependent commune, but as for the money issue, it is what it is.

      Probably contributed to Stalking Cat's later decline & suicide.

    7. e surger- ies took longer to arrange. Steve Haworth of Phoenix, who describes himself as a "body modification and human evolution artist," did most of them: pointing his ears, reshaping his cheeks and forehead with silicone implants, moving his nasal septum, cleaving his upper lip, replacing his teeth with feline dentures.1 T

      While this could be argued, I believe that this is a disturbing breach of the Hippocratic Oath on the part of Steve Haworth. This amount of surgery is not reasonable, and ended up severely hurting Stalking Cat's prospects for jobs and in other areas of their life. I am reminded of other people who have horribly proportioned bodies because of the insane amount of silicone pumped into their bodies, and the medical complications that result.

      Is there a point where we have to say no to body modifications, no matter how much people such as Stalking Cat may want them? Or do we leave that choice up to them?

    8. 192 / Maria Carlson Figure 1. Stalking Cat. he perceives as spiritual to all feline species but particularly to tigers, and he says that his modification simply uses technology to accomplish a sort of transformation long- practiced among his Huron and Lakota ancestors

      This is an interesting account as to the lengths that some members of the furry fandom will go to achieve their image. I give some note to the idea of species identity disorder, as a marked divide between Stalking Cat's vision of themselves and their human body is present. This is quite obviously an outlier, but it's an intriguing illustration. Not to mention that Stalking Cat ties this back to Huron & Lakota ancestor traditions, which is shaky ground at best.

    1. It took only a couple decades for the internet to transform from a weird underground hobby to an entirely new medium for the self. One of the earliest draws of internet society was the invitation to become someone else — to obscure the dull strains of your real life behind a veil of mysterious text or behind an avatar, the image or persona you create to represent you online. In those days, it often seemed like people had collectively assented to participate in some degree of fiction about one another. The person on your forum or in your channel who loved to say inflammatory things was just some troll; you could even assume that he wasn’t like that in real life. That these were only mechanisms specific to the character he lived as online.

      May be useful as comparison.

  2. Jun 2020
    1. The furries are kind of like the new age Native American where they have the spirit animal or connection, or like, they take on that personal animal. . . . And whatever you put on, [you] take on those characters [and] aspects, and, for some people with social stigma who can’t interact, they put on the suit and they’re a completely different person.

      Make note of Sarah Marie Henry's Furries, Fans, and Feminism: Querying and Queering of the Furry Fandom. Sarah Marie Henry made a very good point about the appropriation of Native American culture in the furry fandom, something that is not exactly the nicest thing to do. Traditions stay within certain groups for a reason. A direct quotation/reference may be impossible, as the only copy of this master's thesis is locked up in San Francisco State University, and there's a pandemic. 😕

    2. Furries are in the perilous position of having their interests form an integral part of their identity while simultaneously experiencing stigmatization from the world around them. For many, the fandom is their only source of social interaction and social support.

      For an activity, and a fandom, that is such a large part of the practitioner's identity (see Gerbasi et. al 2008 and associated responses), it's no surprise that the stigmatization that comes with being a furry is an isolating experience. I believe that this is a large a part of the reason why acceptance is such a large tenant of the furry fandom. Exclusion elsewhere leads to increased inclusion in other areas and groups.

      Non-judgementality should be the ultimate goal for health care workers in this position, but we have to recognize that it is a difficult, if not unrideable horse to handle.

    3. A small subset of furries, called “therians,” go beyond the interest in developing a fursona and believe they are spiritually connected to animals, are less than 100 per-cent human, are an animal trapped in a human body, or were an animal in a former life (Gerbasi et al., 2008).

      There's also the dissenting opinion that therians are a separate group from furries, an opinion perpetuated both by therians and "normal" furries, but it's generally the minority opinion, so for all intents and purposes, this is accurate.

    1. She states that furry participants might identify as less than 100% human for reasons that she felt included, “not the least having a hangover from furry drinks the night before.” While it may be an attempt at humor, we find this comment to be egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants. Ironically, this remark illustrates her subscription to the very stereotypes we were empirically testing and con-firms the necessity of our research.

      This comment, framed as "egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants", undermines the prevailing sense of identity in the furry fandom. I understand the transformative powers of alcohol, but in my uneducated opinion, it's a stretch that the furry identity for many people is activated by alcohol, and is not something that exists in all states of being (e.g.: sobriety).

    2. Popular media provided the only available information (Stahl & Lewis, 2003; Gurley, 2001), which suggested that furries had interests in zoomorphism and anthropomor-phism. These media portrayals were resoundingly unfavorable toward furries and empirically unfounded.

      A good example of this was the CSI: Miami episode "Fur and Loathing".

      According to the Reception section of the article on this episode on Wikipedia: "Toronto-based filmmaker Michael McNamara, who had been working on his own documentary episode on furry fandom, said that the CSI episode "portrayed the community as a community of sexual deviants who like to have sex in fur costumes" and expressed concern that "it winds up giving the whole fandom a bad name, which made them nervous and camera-shy, so it was tricky to get their trust".[2] He wrote that the deviancy "probably represents about two percent of fandom but it’s the one obviously that the press always gleefully jumps."[3] Greg Gaudio of The Virginian-Pilot wrote that "The steamier side of the Furry Fandom – sexual behavior involving animal costumes and stuffed animals – has grabbed media attention in recent years, most notably as the subject of a 2003 episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. The episode showed attendees at a furry convention engaging in a costume-clad orgy"; however, one of the furry fandom attendees he interviewed replied that such behavior "only involves a tiny percentage of furries and is not something that’s part of the local scene."[4] Negative perception towards members of the furry fandom for purported sexual deviancy has been a historical shame(?) (<-- figure out correct word in annotated bibliography) amongst members of the furry community, and acts as a harmful stereotype despite the small percentage of furry fandom members participating in acts of plushophilia or autozoophilia.

    3. Her focus on gender identity disorder misses the main point of the study, which was that it was the first empirical study to collect data scientifically and report find-ings on the furry fandom, an often misrepresented subculture.

      One must admit that Flora Probyn-Rapsey's comparisons of gender identity disorder and the proposed "species identity disorder" were not without their merits, no? Heck, Gerbasi et. al were the ones to first make the comparison. It is true that it maybe took up too much of a focus in Probyn-Rapsey's criticism of the original paper. After all, the original paper only made use of the comparisons between the two disorders a few times to illustrate a larger point about disorder & confusion about furry identity, in themselves and in their place in the world at large.

    4. Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s Response to Gerbasi et al.’s “Furries from A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism)”

      Ha.

      This is a rebuttal of a response to Gerbasi et al.'s paper summarizing and examination of the furry fandom. I'm curious to see how this paper will critically analyze the others. Given that it's chiefly written by Kathleen C. Gerbasi and Laura L. Scaletta, who chiefly wrote "Furries from A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism", I have no doubt that the insights throughout will be charged. Or maybe they won't. Professionalism is chief in academia, after all.

    1. I wonder how I can tie this into the furry fandom as a whole. It's pretty clear from this graph that members of the furry fandom, even in Texas, seem to lean towards more liberal political beliefs. Considering the large LGBTQIA+ & animal rights activist populations, groups that tend to skew more liberal themselves, within the furry fandom, this isn't entirely surprising.

    1. Here the diagnosis slips from requiring both being “less than 100% human” and “being 0% human” to only requiring the first criterion—being “less than 100% human.” The implications of this rhetorical slip are a vast shift in proportion, since it triples the number of furries who are potentially diagnosable as having species identity disorder (from 31 to 99 [or 46%] of the 214 furries who answered).

      I would argue that this is too loose of a definition. It does not simply refer to a physical body, which has pretty clear criteria for being considered 100% human. To be "less than 100% human" psychologically, while being a good basis for a disorder, does not adequately consider groups with a spiritual connection to animals, such as the Native American tradition of "spirit animals". This vague definition and exclusion of established cultural practices could prove harmful to the legitimacy of "species identity disorder".

    2. The data on personality disorders showed that furries were less likely to judge other furries as disordered, while the control group (the psychology students) judged other college students “significantly more often” along the lines of personality trait disorders. That the control group was made up of psychology students is perhaps an important factor here; this group may display an increased sensi-tivity to normative behaviors and “disorder.”

      When you ask a group of intermediate psychology students to judge whether furries are disordered, it's very likely that they will diagnose furries with personality trait disorder. They are psychology students, it seems pretty darn obvious that they would be more likely to diagnose psychological disorders, and there's the prevailing possibility of overdiagnosing, diagnosing a personality trait disorder where there may not be one. I am not in a position to say this is what is happening here, but considering the evidence, it's a reasonable possibility.

    3. Species identity disorder is modeled on gender identity disorder, itself a highly controversial diagnosis that has been criticized for pathol-ogizing homosexuality and transgendered people.

      This was also a major problem with the diagnosis "gender identity disorder", which was defined in the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) IV as "A strong and persistent cross-gender identification (not merely a desire for any perceived cultural advantages of being the other sex)."

      In the DSM V, the diagnostic name "gender identity disorder" was replaced with "gender dysphoria", and other important clarifications, including the need for a formal diagnosis of gender dysphoria to go ahead with gender transition surgery.

    1. That signified a total restructuring of my life, even to the point where the old character I had inhabited, a red fox with two tails, the tips of which were dyed green, no longer applied. It was high-school-me. It was me-growing-up. It is not me now.

      Amongst younger members of the furry fandom, there is more of a tendency to have a "sparkledog" fursona, meaning a fursona that's flashy, clashy, colorful, and out-standing. While not as crazy as, say, some of the rainbow-coloured winged kitsune out there, a fox with neon-green tail tips is definitely not something you would see in a real life animal.

      That being said, being a member of the furry fandom, no matter your age, is a matter of self-expression, and the value of debating the realism of a rainbow kitsune with wings falls apart when you realise that they wouldn't even walk on two legs.

    2. the face-first pouncing of foxes

      Visual aid for anyone unfamiliar with this proclivity of foxes, who use this method of hunting to find mice and other burrowing small animals in the wintertime

    3. Discussion along these lines continued after the panel itself, as a few of the attendees convinced me to head out to dinner rather than straight up to bed (thanks for that, it was the first real meal of the day)

      I know that this is supposed to be funny commentary on the chaos on conventions, and I understand, having experienced some of that same craziness during my time at FanimeCon.

      But it's as good of an illustration as any on a negative perception of the furry fandom, the inability of its members to take care of themselves. While this isn't as much a widespread ideal as a minor detail, there's a stereotype around furries as being unwashed, non deodorised, and messy. Take, for example, the idea that people have sex in their fursuits. See this comic involving Grey White, which contain a slight, non-graphic sexual allusion, so click at your own discretion. I'd rather not go into the details, as this research project does not deal with the sexual side of the furry fandom, but I feel as if it is necessary to at least address that specific prevailing concern about the fandom. There is some truth to the above statements, amongst specific members of the furry fandom, and of the science fiction conventions and community which preceded and spawned the "furry fandom" as we know it today. I don't think I need to tell anyone that nerds can smell like shit at times, and it's a concerning pattern. Does this stem from social awkwardness, lack of care, the escapism qualities.

      (I need to come back to this later, as I kind of lost my train of thought)

    4. I began by asking the room full of furries why they chose the animal they did for their species, and I received a lot of answers that fit in well with my experience of the fandom. Notable among the explanations were the oft-used words 'identity', 'connection', 'personality', and 'characteristics'. And this, of course makes sense. Many introductions to furry, whether they're websites (the first introductory website I found was Captain Packrat's explanation of FurCodes) or friends, explain that although furry is about being a fan of anthropomorphism in general, it often (but not always) specifically involves a personal connection with an animal that leads to the creation of a personal character: an avatar often used in interaction with other furries.

      While furries are fans of anthropomorphism in general, they connect more with certain animals. There are subcamps of furries, including scalies (with an interest in reptilian animals such as dragons, turtles, and lizards (e.g.: kobolds)) and avians (interest in birds, mainly), and some of the more popular animals in the furry fandom include foxes, wolves, and big cats. This is, in part, due to popular media representation, with movies such as The Fox and the Hound, Balto, Bolt, Alpha and Omega, and Aristocats. Ever since the "funny animal" cartoons of the early 1900s, there has been a persistent animal superiority in anthropomorphic representations.

    1. For some reason, I can't highlight the 1st comment.

      Trapping one's self into a box is harmful, and leads to the need to feed off of that identity to feel actualized. While I don't believe that setting a firm identity to yourself ultimately or always leads to self destruction, I see where z is coming from. On the contrary, a firm identity can allow people to feel as if they aren't drifting in space, and can give something they can hold onto. Especially in the case of a fursona, a personality (purrsonality?) and figure that is inherently extrinsic, but connected to one's base self, the human. This same logic could be applied to therians and otherkins, possibly even more so, due to the intense non-human identity associated with the terms, as opposed to members of the furry fandom, which may be participating in a more casual, removed fashion.

    2. I took this as an almost alchemical act. After all, alchemy is more than just transmuting literal lead into literal gold. It's the transmutation of a base substance into something better. Through calcination and dissolution, the base - the *prima materia*, the self, the fox - is broken down. Through separation, conjunction, and fermentation, something new is compiled from what was in rough shapes. Through distillation and coagulation, the new self - the cat - is solidified, completed, made whole. As with a lot of how I experience furry, this is a microcosm, rather than something unique. I am not the only one to be deliberate about changing my species, just as I'm not the only one to read way too much into the furry fandom. Furry, as a whole, is an exercise in self-actualization. It is taking the idea of "this is how I want to be seen" to places and extents not often tread. Through each aspect of ourselves, we choose how we want to interact. We choose a species, we choose a name, we choose what aspects of our personalities to show to each other and the world. We construct and create every day of our lives, and we're made all the better for it. Shameless boosterism aside, we're good at what we do and what we make, whether that's art or fun or just ourselves. The more we create, the better we get at it, too. All that's left to do is to keep on creating, to keep putting our intent and our will to work. Just as I can dig into the intent behind changing a name, a fursona, an identity, I can look for the magic of self-actualization within furry as a whole. After all, furry is magic.

      This ties back into an earlier passage in this article. Furry-ism(?) is an exercise in self-actualization. Break 'em down and build 'em up. Throughout our lives, we are encouraged to change ourselves for the better, and this is a parallel to that.

      Shared experience? Prime material and its relation?

    3. As I mentioned back in...oh jeez, 2013 was really five years ago!? As I mentioned half a decade back, a change in species or character often happens around large life changes, and I'm no different. The process of death and rebirth that goes along with this surgery, where I die - hopefully metaphorically - on the table and am reborn, changed, is no small feat. So it was that, shortly after my surgery consult back in 2016, I got the idea to start interacting with friends as something other than an arctic fox. More and more, I started appearing as a snow leopard (because I couldn't seem to let go of those wintry species). At first, it was an 'alt' situation: Maddy, as the snow leopard was called, was an alternate character to use when I wasn't feeling the fox. Art by Grey White She was different from the 'usual' in a few ways. She's cis, for one, unlike the arctic fox, who transitioned along with me. She's shorter and a bit pudgier than I am. She's happier and struggles less with mental health. She's an ideal rather than a reality, and something to be played for fun. Or, well, she was. This 'alt' phase lasted a few months, I suppose, before I woke up one morning and realized I'd not interacted as an arctic fox in a few days. Slowly but surely, the snow leopard had started to overtake the fox.

      The fursona can be an idealization of one's desires in one's self, or it an be a true-to-life representation. If it is changed, it usually changes along with something in your own life. A fursona being a representation of you means that changes are not taken easily. Then again, I also know of furries with many fursonas.

      The truth is, furries often like to hide behind these idealised representations of themselves. For a fandom that's so heavily represented by the introverted, the outcasts, the autistic ((Gerbasi et. al(?)) I need to make sure that's the right paper), it only makes sense that furries would want this sense of escapism. There's also a sense of childlike wonderment at play. Take for example, this article's title, Furry and Magic. The furry fandom, and the action of associating with one's fursona (also, avoid usage of the term "spirit animal", as it appropriates Native American Culture. See Sarah Marie Henry's Furries, Fans, and Feminism: Querying and Queering the Furry Fandom) is a transcendent experience..

      Side note: The short, pudgy female cis snow leopard is scarily close to my own fursona, maybe I should tie personal special experience into this? Or that may be oversharing/stepping out of the line of professionalism. I'll think about that later.

    4. Magic, as they say, is nothing more than an act of intent. It is "the science and art of causing change to occur in conformity with will," if one is to believe Crowley (not necessarily recommended). In this sense, if spells are acts of intent, then coming up with spells is the act of defining one's intentions. In this sense, magic is living deliberately.

      Huh. Nice nod to Aleister Crowley.

  3. knowyourbees-blog-blog.tumblr.com knowyourbees-blog-blog.tumblr.com
    1. HornetsHornets are biologically not bees in nature, but in the Queen Bees’ Beehive, they slightly qualify as a bee. Although hornets have the ability to be bees, they are a bit dysfunctional and a pest to the Beehive. These insects always want something from the Queen Bee. They are “horny” for her do something new and different. All bees experience this feeling once and a while, but they move on from their desires. Hornets however, will not stop buzzing about what they want. They complain too much. These are the type of bees that are easy to be stung within the Beehive. Once they are stung, they will try to sting back, but their stinger is weak because it is not nourished with appreciation of all that the Queen Bee does.

      Does this refer to horniness as in the sexual context or just really excited and pushy for Beyoncé to do something new and cool?

    2. The Yellow JacketsYellow jackets are NOT real bees at all. In fact, these insects are seasonal. Whenever the Queen Bee releases new honey, the yellow jackets will quickly throw their “bee jacket” on and sneak into the Beehive to enjoy her honey for the festive season. However, when the season is over, these insects will throw away the jacket for the Queen Bee and slip on another jacket, buzzing for the next current hottest critter. These insects sting whenever they are put on the spot about their jumpy behavior. Although they sting, it isn’t painful. No sting is painful if it’s not from a true bee.

      This opens up some interesting commentary about the transient nature of some fans, hopping around from fandom to fandom, interest to interest, standom to standom. It's more common than some would like to think, and it's shown in communities such as "transtrenders" (often used as a derogatory term towards the transgender population in general, but a particularly harmful community in itself).

      Outsiders(?) Insiders-Outsiders(?)

    1. “bookish girls tend to mark phases of their lives by periods of intense literary character identification”

      I find parallels to my own experiences associating with and relating to characters in books, such as Kory in Waterways by Kyell Gold.

      Note to self: research "kinnies"

    1. Wow. This is a side of the fandom I wouldn't want to touch with a 20 foot pole. However, it provides interesting information about the darker sides of the furry fandom, so it would be good to pore over.

      I am reminded of "Arkansas":

    1. This is an interesting article. Who has enough money to actually make a fursuit out of real fur? Still, it's a good example of the general public's perception of the subculture.

      I believe that the furry fandom has a large proportion of animal rights activists, vegans, etc., but I need to find research to back this up. I hope that FurCon and other associated conventions ban real fur, though.

    1. I am going to choose the subculture of the furry fandom to base my LS-121 annotated bibliography project on, as I already have some experience with it, and it is a broader topic than some of the other subcultures that I was considering, such as the SCP Foundation fans.

  4. Sep 2019
    1. Indexed the proceedings for Hypertext '87, '91, '93, and ECHT '94 conferences. Currently am creating a global index and hypertext for all the SigWeb (formerly SigLink) hypertext conferences since 1987

      We could index it in Wikidata as part of WikiCite.

  5. Mar 2019
  6. Feb 2019
  7. Jan 2019
  8. Jan 2018
    1. An interactive network of bibliographic connections between some central proteins of the circadian clock, along with links to some major model organisms.

      Circadian clock proteins

  9. Nov 2017
  10. Oct 2017
  11. Jun 2017
  12. May 2017
    1. I have for several weeks now been playing around with a multipaned browser and some php and javascripts in an attempt to tie PS into a usable patchwork. PS3x5 (working name ;) is analogous to taking notes on 3x5 cards. 1. Do your research. 2. Take notes and bibliography info on your 3x5s. 3. Sort, reorder, toss, the 3x5s to create your outline. 4. Write "stuff" to fill in between the 3x5s.    (04) Granular links remain in the finished document. All done in the context of a browser.

      PS Browser

  13. Mar 2017
  14. Jan 2017
  15. Oct 2016
  16. Jul 2016
    1. Earlier studies A number of previous studies, both snapshots and some with longitudinal elements, have shed light on different aspects of such type of journals, which for short we will call “indie” journals.

      Bibliography of "independent journals"

  17. Jun 2016
    1. hmed, Maurana, Engle,Uddin, & Glaus (1997)

      authorship matrix bibliography

    2. However, a diverse body of work on thesocially situated nature of scientific communication alreadyexists which points the way. This ranges from Crane’s(1969) pioneering analyses of invisible colleges throughLatour and Woolgar’s (1979) classic study of laboratory lifeat the Salk Institute to Traweek’s (1992) richly texturedethnography of the HEP community. In addition, the workof Schatz and colleagues on the Worm Community Systemproject, which was designed to capture the full range ofknowledge, formal and informal, of the community of mo-lecular biologists who study the nematode worm C. elegans(see: http://www.canis.uiuc.edu/projects/wcs/index.html)can provide useful insights; so, too, research into the mate-rial practices and social interactions of scientists working incollaboratories, such as the Upper Atmospheric ResearchCollaboratory (see: http://intel.si.umich.edu/crew/Research/resrch08.htm) or the Space, Physics & Aeronomy ResearchCollaboratory (see: http://intel.si.umich.edu/sparc/) at theUniversity of Michigan

      great bibliography on ethnographies of different disciplines

    3. The answer probably has to do with the relative intensityof socialization and oral communication (Traweek, 1992,pp. 120 –123), along with the character of the organizationalstructures and value systems, which define collaborations inlarge-scale, high-energy physics and biomedical research.

      Why is there less soul-searching about hyper-authorship in HEP? disciplinary differences

    4. owever, it isimportant to distinguish between generic job categories andthe specification of tasks performed; the contributorshipmodel is designed to record each individual’s actual input(e.g., experimental design, data collection, statistical analy-sis, final article revision), not job title (e.g., coprincipalinvestigator, technician, systems analyst), since the lattermay on occasion mask or inflate the former (Stern, 2000).

      Great point about movie credits: they are about job title, not contribution.

    5. Rennie, Yank, andEmanuel (1997) that the distinction between the two modesof credit allocation is inherently artificial. Consequently,they have argued for explicit description of all individualcontributions as a means of eliminating ambiguity. Such aproposal would remove both authorship and acknowledg-ment from the frame, a really quite significant break withscholarly publishing tradition. This alternative amounts to aradical model of authorship attribution in contrast to thestandard model

      Rennie, Yank, and Emanuel 1997 argue that acknowledgements and authorship can't be disentangled.

    6. Some journals place a limit on the numberof coauthors; for example, theDutch Journal of Medicinedoes not publish articles with more than six authors (Hoenet al., 1998).

      Journal that caps authorship with bibliography

    7. “sub-authorship collaboration” (Patel, 1973, p. 81),

      acknowledgements as "sub-authorship collaboration"

    8. twe should not assume too much in terms of common un-derstandings: the dividing line between the two classifica-tions, author and acknowledgee, is neither universally ap-preciated nor consistently applied. Cronin (1995, pp. 85–86), for instance, has shown that interpretative disputes arenot uncommon, and that some researchers feel that theyhave been denied their just deserts by being downgradedfrom coauthor to acknowledgee. A

      on boundary between authorship and acknowledgement

    9. Slone (1996), in a survey of “major research” articlespublished in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenology, foundthat undeserved coauthorship rose from 9% on papers withthree coauthors to 30% on papers with more than six coau-thors.

      another estimate of undeserved authorship

    10. Flanagin et al.(1998) developed a multivariate logistic regression model totest the hypothesis that coauthored articles (operationalizedas papers with six or more authors) were increasing at a rategreater than would be expected when confounding vari-ables, such as the number of centers, were taken into ac-count. They found that 19% of original research reports hadhonorific authors, individuals who were garnering phantomfodder for their curricula vitae. They also discovered that11% of articles had ghost authors, which means that quite afew individuals were not receiving due credit for theircreative or material contributions to the research process—“the ghostly inferred hosts of unnamed actors who shiftedinstruments about and exerted their muscular labor’(Shapin, 1995, p. 379). Their findings, based on surveys ofcorresponding authors, are in keeping with other estimatesof honorific authorship in the biomedical literature.

      Bibliography on ghost and guest authorship: flanagin et al 1998 and Shapin 1995, 379

      Used statistical methods and surveys to work out percentage of ghosts and uncredited authors.

    11. norificauthorship and data integrity, seem to be of especial concernto the biomedical community, given widespread media cov-erage of, and speculation about, fraudulent practice, theeffects of which, in both career and personal terms, can bedevastating (e.g., Kevles, 1998).

      about authorship scandals in biomedicine

    12. n the realm of periodical publications,the sovereignty of the standard model is being most hotlycontested in biomedical research fields, where intense levelsof professional collaboration and coauthorship are common-place (Croll, 1984; Rennie & Flanagin, 1994; Rennie, Yank,& Emanuel, 1997; Rennie & Yank, 1998; King, 2000).Proposals for reform, which seek to retire the concept ofauthorship and replace it with a scheme for the allocation ofspecific, task- or job-related credits (e.g., Squires, 1996;Smith, 1997) are not only being debated by editors andothers, but are being adopted by leading scientific journal

      On how credit and authorship is being debated in medical publishing (with bibliography)

    13. Rennie’s and Flanagin’s (1994, p. 469) beguilingly simplequestion: “. . . how many people can wield one pen?” S

      How many people can yield one pen? Question about authorship

    14. Some medical commentators (Rennie, Yank, &Emanuel, 1997, p. 582) have advocated abandoning theconcept of author altogether in favor of ‘contributors’ and‘guarantors,’ thereby freeing us “from the historical andemotional connotations of authorship.”

      bibliography on the emotional connotations of authorship

      Idea is to abandon it entirely, so as to avoid this trap.

    15. ouble-blind) peer review became an established component of thepost-war scientific bureaucracy (Chubin & Hackett, 1990,pp. 19 –24)

      history of peer review

    16. e well-estab-lished “conventions of impersonality” in scientific writing(Hyland, 1999, p. 355) and resulting in the erasure of styl

      on the flattening effect collaborative authorship has on style

    17. s not still common prac-tice in fields such as philosophy or women’s studies (Cro-nin, Davenport, & Martinson, 1997). By way of example,Endersby (1996) has analyzed trends in, and reasons for,collaboration and multiple authorship in the social sciences.Patel (1973) has described the growth of coauthorship insociological journals for the period 1895 to 1965. Bird(1997) has found evidence of coauthorship growth in theliterature of marine mammal science (1985–1993), whileKoehler et al. (1999) found that the average number ofauthors per article in theJournal of the American Society forInformation Science(previouslyAmerican Documentation)rose from approximately 1.2 in the 1950s to 1.8 in the1990s

      bibliography on coauthorship by field

    18. Beaver and Rosen (1978) have shown how the differentialrates of scientific institutionalization in France, England,and Germany are mirrored in the relative output of coau-thored papers.

      bibliography tying rate of coauthorship to professionalisation of science

    19. iking increase inrates of coauthorship, though the latter is only a partialindicator of the former: coauthorship and collaboration arenot coextensive (Katz & Martin, 1997, p. 1). This trend ismost noticeable in experimental high-energy physics(HEP), with its often very large teams and highly sophisti-cated collaborations (Kling & McKim, 2000). A similartrend, dating from the 1990s, can be seen in the biomedicalresearch literature, particularly with regard to publicationsarising from large, multi-institutional clinical trials (Rennie,Yank, & Emanuel, 1997; Horton, 1998). H

      bibliography on HEP (High Energy Physics) collaborations and Biomedicine

    20. o some extent, authorship has becomea collective activity, with numerous coauthors competingfor the byline, some of whom may not have written, strictlyspeaking, a single word of the associated work (McDonald,1995; Kassirer & Angell, 1991).

      extent to which authors may not have written a word in science (with bibliography)

    21. hapin (1995,p. 178) notes in his brilliant study of trust in 17th-centuryEnglish science,

      "Brilliant study of trust in 17th century English science"

    22. As Katzen (1980, p. 191) notes in heranalysis of early volumes of thePhilosophical Transac-tions:. . . no attempt is made to give prominence to the author ofthe article . . . there is generally no reference at all to theauthor in the heading that signals a new communication. Ifthe author is referred to in the title, it is likely to be in anoblique form . . . we are at the threshold between anony-mous and eponymous authorship

      Study of authorship in Philosophical transactions

    23. s Rennie and Flanagin(1994) remind us, there is no standard method for determin-ing order, nor any universalistic criteria for conferring au-thorship status:

      bibliography on authorship practices

    24. Foucault,1977,p.125

      Authorship bibliography

    25. Manguel(1997,pp.182–183)

      Authorship bibliography

    26. lphabetization through weightedlisting to reverse seniority (e.g., Spiegel & Keith-Spiegel,1970; Riesenberg & Lundberg, 1990).

      bibliography on authorship ranking and practices

    1. most systems try to adapt the paper-and-pen paradigm to the digital world. That’s why many systems suffer from several shortcomings inherent in the paper-and-pen paradigm.
    1. The growth in web-based learning materials and information sources has created requirement for systems that allow annotations to be attached to these new sources and, potentially, shared with other learners.
    1. Harter's (1978) finding that expectation of letter grades affected children's task motivation in ways similar to the various extrinsic rewards used in other stud- ies

      Harter 1978 showed that grades are extrinsic motivators. Harter, S. (1978). Pleasure derived from challenge and the effects of receiving grades on children's difficulty level choices. Child Development, 49, 788-799.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. p. 65

      Contains a survey of the authors' own research on each topic (self-handicapping, avoidance of help-seeking behaviour, avoidance of challenge, and cheating.

  18. Apr 2016
    1. White (1984, cited by Vaughan, 1991) reported on a study conducted at California State University in which two essays were tucked into a huge sample of essays and read a year apart by the same readers using a 6-point scale. The reading a year later produced scores that were identical to the first in only 20 per cent of the cases. The scores differed by one point or less in 58 per cent of cases and 2 points or less in 83 per cent of the cases. As White points out, a 1-point difference is generally considered unproblematic, but on a 6-point scale the difference between a 3 and a 4 is the difference between a pass and a fail. Obviously, then, changes in examiner severity/leniency over-time have implications for maintaining standards, and must be monitored. Research has been conducted into variations in examiner severity/leniency during the marking of a particular allocation of scripts, a marking period, and over more extended periods of time.

      intrarater reliability is only 20%

    2. (2004) notes that most research papers describe interrater reliability as though it is a single, universal concept. He argues this practice is imprecise and potentially misleading. The specific type of interrater reliability being discussed should be indicated. He categorises the most common statistical methods for reporting interrater reliability into one of three classes: consensus estimates; consistency estimates; and measurement estimates.

      Stemler 2004

    1. Manso (2011)

      MANSO, G. “Motivating Innovation.”Journal of Finance, Vol. 66 (2011)

    2. Lerner and Wulf’s (2007) study of corporate R&D lab heads.They show that higher levels of deferred compensation are associated with the production ofmore heavily cited patents, whereas short-term incentives bear no relationship to firm innovativeperformance

      LERNER,J.ANDWULF, J. “Innovation and Incentives: Evidence from Corporate R&D.”Review of Economics and Statistics,Vol. 89 (2007), pp. 634–644

    3. Tian and Wang (2010) show that start-up firms backed by morefailure-tolerant venture capitalists are more innovativeex post

      TIAN,X.ANDWANG, T.Y. “Tolerance for Failure and Corporate Innovation.” Working Paper, Indiana University, 2010

    4. Lazear (2000)

    Tags

    Annotators

  19. Mar 2016
    1. Begg, C. B., & Berlin, J. A. (1988). Publication bias: A problem in interpreting medical data.Journal of theRoyal Statistical Society A, 151, 419–463.
    2. Gilbody, S. M., Song, F., Eastwood, A. J., & Sutton, A. (2000). The causes, consequences and detection ofpublication bias in psychiatry.Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 102, 241–249
    3. Greenberg, S. A. (2009). How citation distortions create unfounded authority: Analysis of a citation net-work.British Medical Journal, 339, b2680
    4. Kennedy, D. (2004). The old file-drawer problem.Science, 305, 45
    5. Krzyzanowska, M. K., Pintilie, M., & Tannock, I. F. (2003). Factors associated with failure to publish largerandomized trials presented at an oncology meeting.Journal of the American Medical Association,290, 495–501
    6. Levine, T., Asada, K. J., & Carpenter, C. (2009). Sample sizes and effect sizes are negatively correlated inmeta-analyses: Evidence and implications of a publication bias against non-significant findings.Communication Monographs, 76, 286–302
    7. Marsh, H. W., Bornmann, L., Mutz, R., Daniel, H. D., & O’Mara, A. (2009). Gender effects in the peerreviews of grant proposals: A comprehensive meta-analysis comparing traditional and multilevelapproaches.Review of Educational Research, 79, 1290–1326
    8. Paris, G., De Leo, G., Menozzi, P., & Gatto, M. (1998). Region-based citation bias in science.Nature, 396,6708
    9. Rosenthal, R. (1979). The file drawer problem and tolerance for null results.Psychological Bulletin, 86,638–641

      p

    10. Song, F. J., Parekh-Bhurke, S., Hooper, L., Loke, Y. K., Ryder, J. J., Sutton, A. J., et al. (2009). Extent ofpublication bias in different categories of research cohorts: A meta-analysis of empirical studies.BMCMedical Research Methodology, 9, 79
    11. Sterling, T. D. (1959). Publication decisions and their possible effects on inferences drawn from tests ofsignificance—Or vice versa.Journal of the American Statistical Association, 54, 30–34

      publication bias

    1. Osuna, C., Crux-Castro, L., & Sanz-Menedez, L. (2011). Overturning some assumptions about the effects ofevaluation systems on publication performance.Scientometrics, 86, 575–592

      evaluation systems and publication performance

    2. Silvertown, J., & McConway, K. J. (1997). Does ‘‘publication bias’’ lead to biased science?Oikos, 79(1),167–168.
    3. Yousefi-Nooraie, R., Shakiba, B., & Mortaz-Hejri, S. (2006). Country development and manuscript selec-tion bias: A review of published studies.BMC Medical Research Methodology, 6, 37

      On developing countries and science

    4. Evanschitzky, H., Baumgarth, C., Hubbard, R., & Armstrong, J. S. (2007). Replication research’s disturbingtrend.Journal of Business Research, 60(4), 411–415. doi

      replication research

    5. Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2008a). Perfect study, poor evidence: Interpretation of biases preceding study design.Seminars in Hematology, 45(3), 160–166

      effect of positive bias

    6. Feigenbaum, S., & Levy, D. M. (1996). Research bias: Some preliminary findings.Knowledge and Policy:The International Journal of Knowledge Transfer and Utilization, 9(2 & 3), 135–142.

      Positive bias

    7. Song, F., Parekh, S., Hooper, L., Loke, Y. K., Ryder, J., Sutton, A. J., et al. (2010). Dissemination andpublication of research findings: An updated review of related biases.Health Technology Assessment,14(8), 1–193. doi

      positive bias

    8. Formann, A. K. (2008). Estimating the proportion of studies missing for meta-analysis due to publicationbias.Contemporary Clinical Trials, 29(5), 732–739. doi

      estimate of positive bias in clinical trials.

    9. Fronczak, P., Fronczak, A., & Holyst, J. A. (2007). Analysis of scientific productivity using maximumentropy principle and fluctuation-dissipation theorem.Physical Review E, 75(2), 026103. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.75.026103.

      On rising scientific productivity over shorter careers.

    10. Atkin, P. A. (2002). A paradigm shift in the medical literature.British Medical Journal, 325(7378),1450–1451

      On the rise of sexy terms like "paradigm shift" in abstracts.

    11. Bonitz, M., & Scharnhorst, A. (2001). Competition in science and the Matthew core journals.Sciento-metrics, 51(1), 37–54

      Matthew effect

  20. Feb 2014
    1. Legal Writing for the Courts: An Annotated Bibliography
      • Mechanics
      • Argument
      • Style
      • Writing and Editing Process
      • Legal Briefs
      • Samples