58 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2017
    1. Research suggests link between ageing and severity of autism traits Psychology Article Written by Sarah Cox Published on 22 Aug 2016 Goldsmiths, University of London researchers working with adults recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder have found high rates of depression, low employment, and an apparent worsening of some ASD traits as people age.

      http://www.gold.ac.uk/news/autism-and-ageing/

      https://www.facebook.com/autisticnewsfeed/posts/1555674477776977

    1. “Disorder”

      disorder (n.) : 1520s, from disorder (v.).

      disorder (v.) : late 15c., from dis- "not" (see dis-) + the verb order (v.). Replaced earlier disordeine (mid-14c.), from Old French desordainer, from Medieval Latin disordinare "throw into disorder," from Latin ordinare "to order, regulate" (see ordain). Related: Disordered; disordering.

      http://EtymOnline.com/?search=disorder

  2. Mar 2017
  3. Aug 2016
    1. Credibull score = 0.99 / 10

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    1. Credibull score = 2.87 / 10

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    1. Credibull score = 9.60 / 10

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  4. Jun 2016
    1. For the small population of people with Shank3 mutations, the findings suggest that new genome-editing techniques could in theory be used to repair the defective Shank3 gene and improve these individuals’ symptoms, even later in life. These techniques are not yet ready for use in humans, however.

      when will this apply on human?

  5. Apr 2015
    1. I know I need to touch, gently, upon the notion that making friends or finding love entails risk. There’s no guarantee of forever. There may be heartbreak. But we do it anyway. I drop this bitter morsel into the mix, folding around it an affirmation that he took a risk when he went to an unfamiliar place on Cape Cod, far from his friends and home, and found love. The lesson, I begin, is “to never be afraid to reach out.”

    2. That desire to connect has always been there as, the latest research indicates, it may be in all autistic people; their neurological barriers don’t kill the desire, even if it’s deeply submerged. And this is the way he still is — autism isn’t a spell that has been broken; it’s a way of being. That means the world will continue to be inhospitable to him, walking about, as he does, uncertain, missing cues, his heart exposed. But he has desperately wanted to connect, to feel his life, fully, and — using his movies and the improvised tool kit we helped him build — he’s finding his footing. For so many years, it was about us finding him, a search joined by Griffin and others. Now it was about him finding himself.

      insightful & moving

    3. For most of us, social interactions don’t feel so much like work. We engage instinctively, with sensations and often satisfactions freely harvested in the search itself. For Owen, much of that remains hard work. Despite his often saying to Griffin that his aim is to be popular — a catchall for the joys of connecting with other people — that goal, largely theoretical, has been like watery fuel in his sputtering engine.

      yes, we take for granted what comes naturally to us.