124 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
  2. Mar 2021
    1. Hornsey, M. J., Harris, E. A., & Fielding, K. S. (2018). The psychological roots of anti-vaccination attitudes: A 24-nation investigation. Health Psychology: Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 37(4), 307–315. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000586

    1. Jodi Orth. (2020, November 15). I have a night off from the hospital. As I’m on my couch with my dog I can’t help but think of the Covid patients the last few days. The ones that stick out are those who still don’t believe the virus is real. The ones who scream at you for a magic medicine and that Joe Biden is [Tweet]. @JodiOrth. https://twitter.com/JodiOrth/status/1327771329555292162

  3. Feb 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘@taylorgrayson @skepticscience @ClimateOfGavin @kostas_exarhia I guess this depends on what kind of misinformation/’conspiracy" you are faced with. In the context of climate denial, there is evidence that understanding of expert consensus can impact belief @STWOrg" / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 19 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1361608256486047748

  4. Jan 2021
    1. Why was the change even made, if statistical performance is not improved and the code is just harder to understand? Conspiracy theorists could get the idea of a backdoor (:
  5. Dec 2020
    1. For those awash in anxiety and alienation, who feel that everything is spinning out of control, conspiracy theories are extremely effective emotional tools. For those in low status groups, they provide a sense of superiority: I possess important information most people do not have. For those who feel powerless, they provide agency: I have the power to reject “experts” and expose hidden cabals. As Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School points out, they provide liberation: If I imagine my foes are completely malevolent, then I can use any tactic I want.

      Underlying emotional drivers of Trump supporters, conspiracy theorists, and Republican psychology

    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh} (2020) sadly squares with my own impression of social media 'debate' - as someone who works on both argumentation and belief formation across social networks, this strikes me as every bit as big a problem as the spread of conspiracy. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1308341816333340672

  6. Nov 2020
  7. Oct 2020
    1. The result is that we are living through a period of chaos. Symptoms include conspiracy theories, information bubbles, cancel culture, President Trump’s tweets, and widespread institutional decay and dysfunction.

      Symptoms of this chaotic, gossip run world are: conspiracy theories, information bubbles, cancel culture, Trump's tweets and decay of institutions as well as dysfunction.

  8. Sep 2020
  9. Aug 2020
    1. Obviously not every group chat counts as a “conspiracy”. But it makes the question of how society coheres, who is associated with whom, into a matter of speculation – something that involves a trace of conspiracy theory. In that sense, WhatsApp is not just a channel for the circulation of conspiracy theories, but offers content for them as well. The medium is the message.
  10. Jul 2020
  11. Jun 2020
  12. May 2020