274 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. SEMICOLONSKnowing when to use semicolons is easier if you follow a few simple rules.1. Use a semicolon to join two related complete thoughts (sentences/independent clauses) without using a conjunction.The thunderstorm began just as the audience was leaving; Janet was glad she had taken her umbrella with her to the concert. 2. Use a semicolon to join two related complete thoughts when using conjunctive adverbs (sometimes thought of as transitional words or phrases). Note that a comma follows the conjunction.The thunderstorm began just as the audience was leaving; consequently, Janet was glad she had taken her umbrella with her to the concert. 3. Use semicolons to separate items in parts of a series that already contain commas.The menu included brisket, chicken, and pork barbeque; potato, garden, and fruit salads; cherry cobbler, apple pie, and banana pudding for dessert.
    1. I have noticed that some of my friends who are Indian tend to speak English too fast and run all of the syllables together without pronouncing them properly. So every time they say something I have to ask them to repeat it. To make a good impression, speak slowly and pronounce every syllable. Practice reading out loud, concentrating on pronunciation. Make eye contact.
    2. If you got to the interview, then the company is interested in what you can do for them. They must already know you have poor English. It is probably best to lead with your best hand. There is no need to defend your poor English because it is obvious. Just talk about what you know how to do and how well you fit the job being offered.
    3. For openers, don’t say “fastly”, because there is no such word in English. Also, learn to check your typing so you don’t write “Bur” when you intended “But”. In my opinion you would make a terrible mistake by trying to defend your low skill in English. It is simply an inadequacy you have, and presumably are interested in overcoming. I think it will serve you better to memorize the following speech, and practice saying it until it flows out quickly and easily, with no hesitation or errors. Say this just as the interview begins: “I am very pleased to meet you, Mr. _______. Thank you for granting me this interview. “Before we begin, please let me apologize for my inadequate English skill. I may use some incorrect words, or pronounce some words improperly. I may not be able to answer some questions suitably, because I might lack the right words. “I hope to show you that I have the technical knowledge needed for this position, and that I have the skills and work ethic needed to do the job well. “I am currently working very hard to correct my deficiencies in English, and I believe I can accomplish that soon. I have had great success in learning other languages rapidly, but I have not yet devoted enough attention to developing fluency in English. Please understand that achieving skill in English is my highest priority.” This, I believe, will gain you a very sympathetic ear, and will lead to a very productive interview.
    1. Probably. Reading books and watching movies are fine, but they don’t do much for your active verbal expression. Each aspect of language use — receptive and expressive, reading, writing and speaking — needs to be practiced. And you aren’t getting enough practice speaking and “thinking on your feet.” Work on that and it’ll improve.
    2. Yes, it is normal. Reading English books and watching English movies are passive skills that require the person to absorb only. Your brain stores information. Also, 95% of what you absorb will be lost in time. Not very encouraging but that’s just the reality of it. In order to improve thought process and speech fluency, you have to start using the information that your brain has absorbed. One way is to write summaries and articles on books and movies you have read/seen. Another is learning to articulate your words by practising speaking before a mirror and watch how your mouth/tongue moves as you pronounce words. But the most important way to improve is human interaction. Human interaction calls for your brain to have immediate action and reaction through listening, processing, filtering and then speaking. Daily conversations is the best avenue for improvement. All the best!
    3. If you don’t have experience actually speaking English, preferably in a similar or at least similarly complex situation, and especially if you didn’t even spend quite a lot of time practicing (aloud or at least in your thoughts) what you could say in such a situation - no wonder that you weren’t able to speak very well, actually it would be quite a miracle if you had been able to! Namely, speaking is a different skill from reading and listening, and for most people much more difficult, and most people also need to practice it separately. It took me about a month of working and living nearly every awake moment in an English-speaking environment to start speaking English fluently - after I was already writing fluently, already passing for a native speaker in writing. Many people are quicker than that, but nearly everyone needs quite some practice. And even if you have generally had practice speaking English and can speak it fluently in everyday situations, it is still normal to have trouble because of being stressed out and afraid of the job interview, and/or because of the specific vocabulary it requires. In any case, doing practice job interviews with another person who can speak English, or at least with yourself, should help. This is often needed/ helpful also for job interviews in the native language.
    4. Let me ask you straight question. Did you learned any words and tried using it with someone, or at least in front of the mirror? If you’ve done this, you wouldn't be asking this. When try to speak or try to talk with someone, at first you make mistakes, and that’s very common. Do not be ashamed of who you are. I had this same problem but with Hindi. Even though I learned Hindi in school I couldn’t be fluent. At times I made blunder mistakes especially when I was in Bangalore. I still remember the incident, a guy laughed at me for uttering a word wrong. And he did correct me at the very moment, but at that time I felt very awkward. But later I got many Hindi speaking friends and I got fluent in HIndi now. Same with you amigo, if you don’t let your hands get dirt then no pay off. Try, try, try, eventually you’ll get it.51 views · View 1 upvote
    1. I’ve interviewed a lot of candidates in the past 30 years, and these cases are always the most difficult to adjudicate. On the one hand, millions of brilliant programmers don’t speak great English. On the other hand, if it take twice as long to hold every conversation, that makes for a difficult work relationship. Certainly it makes the face-to-face interview awkward depending on the relative skill level. I’ll put up a ballpark figure and say that “bad English” is a 20% handicapping factor. In other words, out of a 100 points, your grasp of English probably accounts for 20 points.
  2. Jul 2021
    1. There is one way coding, improve your problem solving skills by doing competitive programming and learn development in a specific language, if you have these skills , english or communication skill will be a secondary thing and you also need to improve that for which the best way is to watch english tv shows and movies. Good luck
    2. Like this, I am not sure about the HR rounds. But yes, in technical rounds when my type interviewer finds a candidate is struggling with English, answering a particular question, we say “Are you comfortable in Hindi ?!, Please go ahead in Hindi” And once you answered well. Cheers, You are selected. I am not supporting you should not improve your communication skills, you must, because that's your first impression these days. Good luck :)
    1. As a technical person writing code, all they need is the ability to understand and communicate so that work can progress without any misunderstanding. They are looking for high technical aptitude and a medium satisfactory English speaking aptitude. I have seen foreign people continuously attempt to gain English proficiency while on the job and enhance it just like any other skill. For non-technical positions,higher proficiency is required and in most cases you are required to pass IELTS academic. HTH
    2. The US isn’t particularly tolerant of workers who cannot communicate in English. If you want to be on good projects and you want to be promoted, you need at least good conversational english, with accent minimal enough to be understood, plus a complete grasp of technical english for your profession.
    1. The English language has evolved in too many ways to just settle down with one variant or dialect. You must have a thorough knowledge of all variants of the English languageYou must not depend on Spell Check to conform to UK English or US English or AU EnglishGrammar must be impeccable. Surprisingly Americans enjoy the British accent and dialect; and some may choose to use that as a "brand identity" - you need to be aware of the nuancesSoftware companies often don't care about this; but their clients do. Which means it may not appear in a job interview but when you speak with your clients having a good handle on the preferred variant would be a huge bonus. And a reason for that client to specifically ask for YOU to be their support person / service manager. In my work with clients in India and abroad, I've generally found they they understand the Indian accent fairly well - as long as the words and phrases used are suitable to the region. If you use a heavy Texan accent while talking to someone native to Norway, chances are they won't understand you too well. Sometimes, albeit rarely, you need a translator. Yes English to English translation is a possibility wherein complex words and phrases native to one culture need to be put in context while talking to a different culture. In fewer words: Learn Everything. Keep Learning.
    1. Yes. If your English isn't good you may have trouble understanding and may have trouble being understood. That's bound to make things difficult. However, if it's good enough, you don't have to worry about it. The interviewer will do their best to communicate, and they are unlikely to be biased against non-native speakers, because probably most people at Google aren't.
    1. It is not mandatory to be fluent in English but it is necessary that you learn enough English to communicate your thoughts and opinions and understands others. English is a universal language and so it is important to know basic level English in order to work for multi-national companies like Google.
    1. Every answer to every single doubt in your life solely depends on what you want to do and where you want to reach. If you want to be a content reviewer, knowing English-movie level English is more than enough. If you want to be a person who documents stuff, its always better if you are spot on in your written English. If you want to be somebody who wants to travel to different countries and communicate with different people, well you definitely should be a man with words. And if you end up to be somebody like me, a Software Developer, the only English that you'll be expected to speak is the extent of the Programming Language. It might seem as a done and dusted script, but in the long run, only hard work pays off and shows the character you're made of.Depends what you are working hard on and for.If you know that the only goal for you is to see the view from a mountain top and wave to a friend, be wise and finish it in the daylight. Cheers!
    1. Brij Bhushan Tripathi, Software Developer at SAP Labs India (2017-present)Updated November 23, 2018I have been a hindi medium student. When I joined college, I faced the same problem. Initially I thought that this is because my Grammer is weak. So, I worked on it a bit. But still, I was not able to speak English fluently. Then I realized that to speak any language, you do not necessarily need to learn its grammar (although, it's highly recommended). As a child, I started speaking hindi when I was 2 years old but the Grammer was taught to me years later. All you need is confidence that whatever you are speaking is correct. But gaining such confidence is easier said than done. I mean, how do you convince yourself that you are good at something when you know you are not. Then I realized that a big part of any language is spoken using a limited set of words and phrases. So, now it was time to learn those frequently used words and phrases. For this, I started watching a lot of English TV series and news stories. Now, I started gaining confidence. I could have a conversation with my south Indian friends in English who were not good at Hindi. But still, I used to choke in pressure situation. I could not ask questions in lectures. I could not make announcements from the stage. I could not talk to my crush. To solve this issue, I started talking to myself in English. I used to read a single news topic from 3-4 sources. Then, I would stand in front of a mirror and talk to myself regarding that particular news item. This gave me more confidence and also improved my accent a bit. After all this, I was fairly comfortable with English. now, I was able to have a proper conversation in English. Initially, I failed at some instances but that is a part of any learning curve. Now I needed to improve my vocabulary. I believe there is no shortcut to it. I have been reading English news paper for the same. Also, I try listening to people speaking English. it gives me an idea of common mistakes that people make while speaking. For example, a lot of people use second form of verb @with ‘did’. Whenever I find such issues, I make sure to not make the same mistake myself. During the whole process, it's important to stay positive. Always remember that it's okay to be bad at a language that you have never spoken. There is nothing wrong with it. I am not saying that my English is perfect. Probably there are some mistakes in this answer itself. But with my current level, I can have a comfortable conversation with client sitting in US. I can talk properly in an interview. In most of the situations, English is not a thing for me to worry about. I hope it helps.
    2. Start thinking in English so you would get every word in your mind… if you think in other languages like Hindi or so you need to translate the words & there you find difficulty to look for words… Stop translating start thinking in English… definitely it would improve your vocabulary & speaking skills ….
    3. Like the others said - Read. But, one more thing can help - talk to yourself when you are alone - in English! You could rehearse some lines in front of a mirror, record yourself and play back and improve. With time, fluency will come.You could ask a friend to be your sounding board for your English speaking experiments and have them correct you when you go wrong. Make your "to-do" lists in English and keep reading them out to yourself. Include some English speaking related tasks daily - for instance, think up some scenario and your response in English to that. Say you wish to discuss the weather with somebody, or the nature of your job. Every day carry on an imaginary conversation with yourself in English, record it, play it back, check your mistakes, correct the sentences and say them again. I really hope this helped because you seem so keen to do a good job with conversational English, that I am sure you can succeed with some perseverance.
    1. Sure. A lot of people with limited knowledge or even no knowledge of English work here. You can certainly find a job but it may not be what you want to do. Best option is to work for a person from your own country who is fluent in English and has his or her own business where most of the customers are also from your own country. He or she may own a retail store, gas station (petrol station), hair or beauty salon, landscaping or construction company, restaurant, etc. You will need to communicate with your owner to do most or all of your work and most of the customers or clients will also be from your own country. While working in such an environment you can also work on learning English. There are many resources available in US for speakers of other languages who want to learn English1.1K views · View 2 upvotes
    1. If you are able to put your ideas and thoughts in an understandable way for another person to get what you want to convey. Take it simply like you talk in your native language saying what you want to say. Try being yourself and speak without keeping in mind what you think about your communication skills. And this is something definitely you can work on to get better at it. Youtube has lots of resources to help you improve with your communication skills. And with regular trails, people get better at it.
    2. Yes. You will get a job. There are many jobs that do not require excellent communication skills in English. If you can communicate with clarity, listen carefully to what others have to say, you have qualified for the job. You must be fluent in the local languages that also helps you in the job. Besides, learning English is not difficult at all. By practice, you can master this language and the best way is to keep talking and listening. When someone corrects you, thank them and move on and not get bogged down by criticism.
    3. Jens Hartmann, Head of Learning & Development at Barrett Consulting Group (2012-present)Answered February 9, 2017Originally Answered: Is it possible find work, if I don't speak English very well?When I have interviews with people I always look for their willingness to learn. If they didn’t even bother to learn the language used in my company, I’d be worried how well they would learn the other stuff they needed to know to work here. It doesn’t matter if your English isn’t very good yet, if you showed that you are working on it and are eager to get better then I would be happy with that.
    4. Knowing fluent English is not a prerequisite to get a job. However, it depends on the type of job and your own personal ambitions. If you are seeking a job where knowledge of English is a essential or you aspire for growth in your job, then perhaps it is possible that poor communication skills in English could hamper your selection/ progress. The fact that you have drafted your question in Quora without any mistake, suggests to me that your competence in English, is fairly good ( especially when I see a large number of very poorly drafted questions being asked on Quora). Hence all you need to do is keep working on enhancing your competence in English and use it to grow personally and professionally.
    1. poor English speaking will worsen your opportunities in any country to get a software job…. forget about job in US which is their native language and more over its the universal language too.. so I feel it is must ,at least an IELTS band of 6.5 will be good enough
    1. Yes you can get software job without fluency in English. Software industry requires only technical skills but you must be good in that skills. The requirement of good English skill comes after you reach certain level/position. I.e. If you become a project manager you would have to communicate among different departments and customers. So for better understanding of project you must attain good communication skills. I am not focusing on English skills only. You must be a good communicator in your native language also. I have seen people getting stuck on a developer position even after a good set of technical skills and experience. It is necessary when you are looking for jobs in a state other than your native language. There you must have a good English skills to communicate among your colleagues.
    1. However, for getting hired as a software developer, it really doesn’t matter about how much English you know. Software companies look for candidates who have the knowledge and got a fine way of representing it. May be that’s what you should focus on. It’s about standing in a market and selling yourself. And that needs you to know the domain specific English, mostly the technical jargon stitched by few simple words of English.
    1. Well the question is structured very well, so I don't think you have a poor English. Have faith in yourself buddy. Don't get disheartened that you have a weak grip on English. 1.) Be confident. Confidence alone can do wonders. Tell yourself standing infront of the mirror, that you're going to make it and no force in the world, can stop you. 2.) Use simple sentences. Don't rush, take you time. 3.) And if you fail, then it's fine. It's not true that we will win everytime. Sometimes we do fail. But never give up. Work on yourself and surley you will make it.
    2. You can face it (job interview, life quandry, challenge, fear, anxiety, stress, etc.) with bravery, courage, kindness, patience, forgiveness, gratitude, knowledge/wisdom (you know that you'll do the best you can with what you have/know), and the ability to laugh at yourself. (:
    3. First of all, I'm not going to sugarcoat saying, tackling interviews is easy with bad English. No, they are not. But, on the bright side, interviews are more about what else you do apart from speak well. So, concentrate on that part. Learn the basic grammar. Keep your sentences short, crisp and relevant.Don't let the hesitation or the feeling that you are bad at something, cloud your clarity about things you clearly know. This in my opinion should be sufficient to face any interview.
    4. The one thing I am not sure about is, the eligibility criteria for the interview that the you are going for. If Spoken English is one of their major assessment criteria, I think you shouldn’t go unprepared. Start planning and preparing for the interview if you still have time. You could try these:Do mock interviewsPrepare good answers for most frequently asked questionsTry to exhibit confidence in your voice and body languageBe sincere in your answersRead about the company in detailHope it’s of use!
    5. First of all, I'm so happy that you've accepted your limitation and you want to make an attempt to overcome it. The only way you can get better at English is by using it as frequently as possible. So, start conversing with people in English. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. Everyone does. Just don't give up. People will laugh and try to pull you down, yes! Ignore those bastards! Interviewers are nothing but people. And they make grammar mistakes too. And more than your language, it's the skill you possess that matters. So, go out. Stay positive. Talk to whoever you meet. Do not be afraid to learn! We're not perfect either. Cheers to your spirit,love! :)
    6. I once had to hire a software engineer. The job required some knowledge of classical physics. In the end the choice was down to two applicants. Both were Vietnamese immigrants. One spoke English very well and already had the necessary knowledge. The other knew no physics at all, and struggled with English. I hired the latter applicant because, despite his weakness in the language, he was open and easy to talk with. The other was more reserved. I felt that I could easily teach the latter the physics he would need, and that he would be motivated to follow directions. He worked out very well. I wrote all the physics he would need to know on seven pages. He successfully worked from that. By the time I left that company he was ready to fill my shoes as the new software director.
    7. Does’t matter. Face it and experience it. There is nothing for you to lose but gain. Once you are rejected, you will have following things for next one. a) What basic questions Interviewer does ask ? Prepare them for next one. b) Confidence . it will help you in next one. PS:- Learn grammar. Improve listening skill, Start writing about your daily activity, at last but not least- “start speaking” . PPS:- Watch Hollywood movies with subtitles and repeat the dialogue .
    8. You have rated yourself as “really bad” in speaking English. What efforts have you taken to improve? I’m sure you must have made some efforts and you feel that it’s not good enough compared to those who have studied in English medium schools . If what you say is understood by others, you are doing fine. Now coming to impress the IO. At SSBs the IO is evaluating your personality qualities from what you answer to his questions. For example, if you are asked to narrate your daily routine, you must arrange your thoughts sequentially, narrating essentials events of your day and how you manage your time, how you take responsibilities, how you interact with others in the day etc etc. Please be reminded that spoken English, pronunciation etc. improves with time and interaction with others in company. In my case, although I am from an English medium school, my spoken English was far from the English spoken by other cadets in my course. However, with passage of time and my eagerness to improve, I was as fluent as others. You will find the other candidates who come for ssb are as good/bad as you are. My sincere advice is not to have any complex about spoken English. There are many other things to emphasize on. Now, some tips for you to improve are:Try speaking to your family members and friends in English only.Listen to English news on TV . Admire and try to emulate the anchor.Pick up topics and speak on them to your family members or friends and if there’s no audience, speak to the mirror. Record your speech in your cell phone and notice the areas that could be improved. I am sure, your speech on the 7th day would be much much better than the one recorded on the first day.Finally, have the confidence that you are the best learner and can do it.Best wishes.
    9. Whenever you are about to face an interview, the most important thing is to be confident, how you are presenting matters the most and whether you know or don't know any answer try not to get nervous .When it comes to english, try to use simple present tense and past tense while framing sentences. Always try to keep them simple and understandable. While facing any interview, there will be a set of common questions asked for all except your field knowledge. Before attending any interview, find out those questions, make a list of them and start practicing them in home.Afterall, practice makes a man perfect. So even if you are not fluent still you can easily crack any interview. Keep trying and giving interview, even if you don't get selected, you will gain experience which will be helpful while giving next inteeerview. In the end I would say just FACE IT ALL. YOU will crack it easily.
    1. En dashes, which are about the width of an upper-case N, are often mistaken for hyphens. But, traditionally, en dashes function as a kind of super hyphen. They’re meant to give you a little extra glue when you have a compound modifier that includes a multi-word element that can’t easily be hyphenated. For example, the phrase Elvis Presley–style dance moves uses an en dash because Elvis-Presley-style dance moves is awkward; “Elvis Presley” isn’t a compound modifier, so hyphenating it looks odd. But, keep in mind, not all readers will notice en dashes or understand what they mean. Sometimes, it’s better to simply reword the phrase. Elvis Presley–style dance moves or: dance moves like Elvis Presley’s pre–World War II buildings or: buildings constructed before World War II En dashes are also used to show ranges of numbers, such as times, page numbers, or scores (I’ll schedule you from 4:30–5:00). But, outside of formal printed publications, this type of en dash is commonly replaced with a simple hyphen.
    1. I arrived in England in the early 80s when there were still only three TV channels. I was used to watching Emmerdale Farm and Yes Minister. Then The Young Ones came on and just blew me away. I loved the irreverence. I loved that they share this house, but are all so different. I loved how they smack each other around. It would just flip from one thing to another. It was totally out of the box.I’d watch it with my family or school friends and record it on our VCRs so that we could memorise the lines. Even today, 30 or 40 years later, I’ll see Vyv [Adrian Edmondson] or Neil [Nigel Planer] in something and think: “It’s Vyv!” or: “It’s Neil!” I can still quote the lines.AdvertisementPeople in America know The Young Ones. It had a life here, too. We also got The Comic Strip Presents … with that guy [Alexei Sayle] who did that song about that car [Ullo John! Gotta New Motor?]. I particularly remember the episode Didn’t You Kill My Brother? where he plays the gangster twins.

      I loved 'The Young Ones'.

    1. Similarly, in Alex’s 3D arts class, students learned about traditional art concepts like perspective and color theory to create 3D clay models that then became digital creations, and in an esports class he created, students wrote backstories for characters and scripts for esports broadcasts. One student had previously struggled with writing assignments, but writing within the context of esports helped him realize that he could write—and that he enjoyed it.
    1. Anne: What was family life like with you and your brother and your mother and father? Did you guys speak English at home? Did you do American things, activities? Do they work a lot? Tell me a little bit about family life.Juan: Right now, my dad, he's always been the boss of the family. He's always worked, he works in construction, and as you know, Utah, with the climate change, it snows, it rains, all of the climates. Since he works in construction, he does work outside all the time, so even if it snows or even if it rains, even if it's minus five degrees outside, he still goes out and works because nobody's going to give him the money to provide for his family.Juan: In a way, my dad, you can say he's one of those hard working men who doesn't look out for himself, but rather looks out for his family. In my house we spoke Spanish all the time because of my mom. To this day, she doesn't want to learn English even though we tell her to learn English. My little sister, she doesn't speak Spanish, she speaks more English and with her it's different. We tell her, "You have to learn Spanish because it's going to help you," but she doesn't want to learn.Anne: Is she a citizen?Juan: Yes, she was born in the US. So my parents didn't really adapt to the American culture. They always wanted to follow Mexican traditions, even when it's Mother's Day over there … I think here it's May 10th but over there, when is Mother's Day?Anne: I think it's the second Sunday of May, so it could be different days.Juan: We could take that as an example. They'd rather follow Mother's Day here in Mexico than over there. Also Christmas, I guess the one thing they did adapt to was Thanksgiving. We don't celebrate that here in Mexico, but they do celebrate there, and they did adapt that. Another thing, Easter day. You go out with your family, you hide the eggs as a tradition, no? They adapted to that, but here in Mexico they don't do that. They don't even know about that. In a way they wanted to keep their Mexican culture alive even though they were in the US, but they also wanted to adapt to the things that they did there.

      Time in the US, Homelife, Mexican traditions, Holidays, Spanish language, US traditions, Holidays

  3. Jun 2021
    1. ამ კვლევის თანახმად, იმ ქვეყნის მოქალაქეებს, სადაც ტელევიზიაში ინგლისური ფილმები სუბტიტრებით გადის, ინგლისურში უფრო მაღალი შედეგი აქვთ.

      Dubbing countries in our sample invest the same in education as the subtitling countries. Yet subtitling countries score 3.4 points higher in the TOEFL exams.

      We show that the television translation methods can explain part of the skills gap. We identify a subtitling effect equivalent to 16.9% of the overall TOEFL score.

      We also analyze the differential impact of subtitling by type of English skill (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). We find that the strongest effect is for listening (19.4%).

    1. Anne: So, you were playing this game with the tapes—Ben: With the tapes and stuff and then later we started elementary school and then once I started elementary school, it changed. Well my mother had a rule, she goes, "No English inside of the house.” Before, it’s “Speak English, speak English,” but once we started school, she goes, "I don't want you all speaking English here inside the house” to me and my brother. And we used to think that’s because she didn't understand, but it was because she wanted us to practice the Spanish.Ben: And when I would get home from school when I was going to kindergarten—my brother would get out an hour later—I would get home and my mother would give me these little comic magazines, Mexican comic magazines, and she'd have me read them. And then she would make me write letters to my grandmother. So that's how I was able to learn a little bit of, keep the Spanish and English. But English I did, I went through elementary, middle school, went to tenth grade in high school, then I dropped out of high school to go help my father. He started a small construction business, but then he got sick and he was hospitalized for three months.

      Time in the US, School, Kindergarten, Elementary, Learning English, Arriving in the United States, Living situation, Homelife, Parents, Expectations

    1. Anita: When did you start going to school, in Chicago or in LA?Luisa: I moved to Chicago and that's where I started going to school. I started going to school at the age of six. Unfortunately, the school that I went to did not have a bilingual program. I was stuck with Miss S. [Chuckles]. I'm never going to forget her … Miss S., lovely woman [Chuckles].Anita: Is that sarcastic?Luisa: Yes, [Chuckles] very sarcastic. Did not speak a lick of Spanish. Not one sentence. I don't think she knew how to pronounce anything, and she was as WASP [White Anglo-Saxon Protestant] as you can get. This woman would get extremely frustrated with me—extremely—and I didn't know what was going on. To me, it was a completely … [Disgusted sound] it was mind-boggling how I could go from—I knew how to read and write in Spanish. I was a pretty smart kid. I knew how to read and write in Spanish at six years old. So I go into first grade and I can't even understand what my teachers are saying, so it was extremely frustrating and this teacher found it extremely frustrating as well, so she would lay me down face down half the day on the magic carpet where she would read stories to everyone because she didn't want to deal with it anymore. I told my mom—Anita: Because she didn't want to deal with what?Luisa: Deal with me anymore. I guess she didn't know where to put me. She didn't know what to do with me, she didn't know how to teach me, so her solution was to put me aside and not have to deal with me, so I had to pretty much be invisible for half the class. Just put my head down and not say a word. So I picked up English extremely fast because I had to [Chuckles]. I had to pick up English very, very, very fast or that was going to keep happening. I didn't want that to keep happening, so I picked it up.

      Time in the US, School, Elementary, Learning English, Teachers, Discrimination/stigmatization, Working hard; Time in the US, Feelings, Frustration, Determination

    2. Yes, [Chuckles] very sarcastic. Did not speak a lick of Spanish. Not one sentence. I don't think she knew how to pronounce anything, and she was as WASP [White Anglo-Saxon Protestant] as you can get. This woman would get extremely frustrated with me—extremely—and I didn't know what was going on. To me, it was a completely … [Disgusted sound] it was mind-boggling how I could go from—I knew how to read and write in Spanish. I was a pretty smart kid. I knew how to read and write in Spanish at six years old. So I go into first grade and I can't even understand what my teachers are saying, so it was extremely frustrating and this teacher found it extremely frustrating as well, so she would lay me down face down half the day on the magic carpet where she would read stories to everyone because she didn't want to deal with it anymore. I told my mom—

      Time in the US - education - primary school - learning English -

    1. I was the only one that talked English, and it was just hard.

      Time in US - learning/speaking English

    2. After that I got to the United States and I started going to school. I didn't really know English, so that was kind of tough, but I picked it up quick, because kids out there are just like—or kids anywhere you know how they could be.

      Time in US - picking up English - education

  4. May 2021
    1. With some continued clever searching today along with some help from an expert in Elizabethan English, I've found an online version of Robert Copland's (poor) translation from the French, some notes, and a few resources for assisting in reading it for those who need the help.

      The text:

      This is a free text transcription and will be easier to read than the original black-letter Elizabethan English version.

      For those without the background in Elizabethan English, here are a few tips/hints:

      For the more obscure/non-obvious words:

      Finally, keep in mind that the letter "y" can often be a printer's substitution for the English thorn character) Þ, so you'll often see the abbreviations for "the" and as an abbreviation for "that".

      Copland's original English, first printing of Ravenna can be accessed electronically through a paid Proquest account at most universities. It is listed as STC 24112 if you have access to a firewall-free site that lets you look at books on Early English Books Online (EEBO). A photocopy can be obtained through EEBO reprints on Amazon. Unless you've got some reasonable experience with Elizabethan black-latter typography, expect this version to be hard to read. It isn't annotated or modernized.

      @ehcolston I'm curious to hear what the Wilson/Pena text looks like. I'm guessing it's not scholarly. I think Wilson is a recent college grad and is/was a publishing intern at a company in the LA Area. I'm not sure of Pena's background. I suspect it may be a version of the transcribed text I've linked with a modest updating of the middle English which they've self-published on Amazon.

      Of course, given the multiple translations here, if anyone is aware of a more solid translation of the original Latin text into English, do let us know. The careful observer will notice that the Latin version is the longest, the French quite a bit shorter, and the English (Copland) incredibly short, so there appears to be some untranslated material in there somewhere.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. I actually think this is Not Constructive, since there's no absolute rule about which pairings can be joined into a single word or hyhenated, and it's pointless having "votes" here about each specific case. Follow a style guide if you have one, or search Google Books and copy whatever the majority do. Or just make your own decision.
  6. Mar 2021
    1. The words type, concept, property, quality, feature and attribute (all used in describing things) tend to be used with different verbs. E.g. Suppose a rose bush is defined as a plant that is "thorny", "flowering" and "bushy". You might say a rose bush instantiates these three types, or embodies these three concepts, or exhibits these three properties, or possesses these three qualities, features or attributes.
    1. Originally he had used the terms usage scenarios and usage case – the latter a direct translation of his Swedish term användningsfall – but found that neither of these terms sounded natural in English, and eventually he settled on use case.
    1. Fires an invalid event at the element

      First time I've seen/heard it said that an event is fired at some target. But it sure makes sense, since it matches how "fire" is used in other senses (like shooting a gun).

  7. Feb 2021
    1. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/cy/Dillad1/tips-and-notes

      This looks like the divergence of the idea of fox and vixen could appear here with mutations in these languages then later entering English.

      The pronunciation difference of ff and f also could factor here.

    1. The Oxford English Dictionary says that the global network is usually "the internet", but most of the American historical sources it cites use the capitalized form.
  8. Jan 2021
  9. Nov 2020
    1. convict

      The [convict] is in prison on the outskirts of the town.

      narapidana

    1. Warning: Many native English speakers find who versus whom difficult and frequently get it wrong. This is also due to the fact that it is falling out of fashion and is often seen as archaic.
    2. The easy way to tell if you need who or whom is to substitute it for he or him and see which one makes sense.

      Yep, that's the trick that I use too :)

  10. Oct 2020
    1. Anti-Features

      I don't think this is what Anti-Features means. Here he's listing things that this tool lacks, some of them being good things, like the "Does not require updating every time a new Ruby version comes out". That's a feature, not an anti-feature!

      Check out how F-Droid uses the term. Anti-feature means things that are present that aren't wanted. Undesirable "features" that are present.

      Unless they are just implying (but not explicitly saying):

      Anti-features that are not included

    1. In agent-oriented programming the antonym is depender, though in general usage the common term dependent is used instead. There is no common language equivalent for dependee', however – other metaphors are used instead, such as parent/child. The circumlocutions “A depends on B” and “B is depended on by A” are much more common in general use than “A is the depender, B is the ' dependee ”.
    1. Logistically speaking, I suppose "depender" and "dependee" would be more accurate, though neither of those are proper english words as far as I know.
  11. Sep 2020
  12. Aug 2020
    1. "Great Time sits enamoured at your feet" Time is personified as an unrequited lover figure who admires the beauty of the statue. As the statue is permanent being who does not bend at Time's will, Time pleads to the statue to speak. The statue's feet are permanently locked into the ground despite's Time's efforts.

    1. Here's what 20 seconds of googling turned up: University of Rochester Grammar Style Guide oh hey look, a stackoverflow thread The truth about grammar: bailout versus bail out and there are so many more...
    1. I think the conjugation is particularly helpful to see why it should be two separate words: "log in" -> "logging in" -> "logged in"
    2. Perhaps someone should give an example of when 'into' is ever correct. "Turn into bed" is definitely incorrect, unless one is morphing into the form of a bed. But what about "he fell into the hole", "she went into the house", or "Star Trek Into Darkness"?
    1. Lie: I felt sick, so I lay down.Here’s where it can get a bit tricky. The past tense of lie is lay, but not because there is any overlap between the two verbs. So when you say, “I lay down for a nap,” you’re actually using the verb lie, not lay, despite the way it sounds.
    1. “Blogging” has a poor brand within many high status employers, whereas “memos” and “essays” do not. Try to categorize your writing as these things rather than a blog post.

      Interesting alternatives for the word "blogging"

  13. Jul 2020
    1. source | edit | rollback | link

      I can see (here) another reason people might incorrectly spell the verb roll back as "rollback": because they are including it in a list of other single-word words separated only by spaces. If one were to include the space in "roll back" as it should have, then it would "break" this meaningful-whitespace design/layout.

    1. set up

      This is the past participle of the verb "to set up".

      Also: do a web search for "be set up" vs "be setup".

    2. The verb set up, on the other hand, is usually found as an open compound (two words, no hyphen) in both American and British English.
  14. Jun 2020
    1. Either, plus presumably "bug-fix." The word has almost surely been coined multiple times by people who hadn't heard it before, because the utility is obvious. In some universe where English was required to always make sense, the one-word or hyphenated forms would be the most likely, since two words implies that "bug" is an adjective.
    2. It’s a “bug” and you “fix” it - so properly, in English, it’s a “bug fix” - but very often it’s shortened to “bugfix”.
  15. May 2020
    1. The element dem in epidemic, endemic, and pandemic comes from the ancient Greek word demos, which meant people or district:

      Interesting how a word (pandemic) that literally means "all people" has ended up (only) meaning a disease that effects all people. Yet nowhere in the word does it say anything about a disease.

    1. Is "customizability" an English word? Yes. It is a root word in English, "custom," with English suffixes added according to the rules of English morphology. So even if it isn't in the dictionary, it is a perfectly legitimate English word.
    2. Customizability is a popular word that arose of jargon in software and computer related circles . It is not yet a formally recognized and would not be correct utilized it is not yet a formally recognized and would not be correct utilized in formal writing outside of its common reference to the flexibility of a design and it's ability to be altered to fit the user.
    1. except, as anticipated a little earlier, any custom services

      This seems like it might not be the correct way to use "anticipated". Seems like it is meaning "as mentioned earlier". Certainly an uncommon usage, anyway.

  16. Apr 2020
    1. the spelling "Web site" (and the less questionable "web site") is an anachronism from the 1990s that is still in use by the NYT and some other conservative print media in the US while most others (including the online sections of the NYT!) today use "website".
    2. Website is not a proper noun (as opposed to the Internet), hence not capitalized.
    3. English tends to build new compound nouns by simply writing them as separate words with a blank. Once the compound is established (and the original parts somewhat "forgotten"), it's often written as one word or hyphenated. (Examples: shoelaces, aircraft...)
    4. Web site / website seems to be somewhat in a transitional stage, being seen as an "entity" that web page hasn't reached yet. Depending on which dictionary you check you will find web site and website, but only web page, not webpage.
    1. The non-extension page, example.html

      Identifying something by what it is not: Thought it was interesting how they call it a "non-extension page" to clarify that it's not an extension page. I guess that might be the clearest way to clarify that.

  17. Mar 2020
  18. Feb 2020
    1. The beforn seyd creatur was mech comfortyd bothe in body and in sowle be this good mannys wordys and gretly strengthyd in hir feyth. And than sche was bodyn be owyr Lord for to gon to an ankres in the same cyté whych hyte Dame Jelyan. And so sche dede and schewyd hir the grace that God put in hir sowle of compunccyon, contricyon, swetnesse and devocyon, compassyon wyth holy meditacyon and hy contemplacyon, and ful many holy spechys and dalyawns that owyr Lord spak to hir sowle, and many wondirful revelacyons whech sche schewyd to the ankres to wetyn yf ther wer any deceyte in hem, for the ankres was expert in swech thyngys and good cownsel cowd gevyn. The ankres, heryng the mervelyows goodnes of owyr Lord, hyly thankyd God wyth al hir hert for hys visitacyon, cownselyng this creatur to be obedyent to the wyl of owyr Lord God and fulfyllyn wyth al hir mygthys whatevyr he put in hir sowle yf it wer not ageyn the worshep of God and profyte of hir evyn cristen, for, yf it wer, than it wer nowt the mevyng of a good spyryte but rathyr of an evyl spyrit. The Holy Gost mevyth nevyr a thing ageyn charité, and, yf he dede, he wer contraryows to hys owyn self, for he is al charité. Also he mevyth a sowle to al chastnesse, for chast levars be clepyd the temple of the Holy Gost, and the Holy Gost makyth a sowle stabyl and stedfast in the rygth feyth and the rygth beleve. And a dubbyl man in sowle is evyr unstabyl and unstedfast in al hys weys. He that is evyrmor dowtyng is lyke to the flood of the see, the whech is mevyd and born abowte wyth the wynd, and that man is not lyche to receyven the gyftys of God. What creatur that hath thes tokenys he muste stedfastlych belevyn that the Holy Gost dwellyth in hys sowle. And mech mor, whan God visyteth a creatur wyth terys of contrisyon, devosyon, er compassyon, he may and owyth to levyn that the Holy Gost is in hys sowle. Seynt Powyl seyth that the Holy Gost askyth for us wyth mornynggys and wepyngys unspekable, that is to seyn, he makyth us to askyn and preyn wyth mornynggys and wepyngys so plentyuowsly that the terys may not be nowmeryd. Ther may non evyl spyrit gevyn thes tokenys, for Jerom seyth that terys turmentyn mor the devylle than don the peynes of helle. God and the devyl ben evyrmor contraryows, and thei schal nevyr dwellyn togedyr in on place, and the devyl hath no powyr in a mannys sowle. Holy Wryt seyth that the sowle of a rytful man is the sete of God, and so I trust, syster, that ye ben. I prey God grawnt yow perseverawns. Settyth al yowr trust in God and feryth not the langage of the world, for the mor despyte, schame, and repref that ye have in the world the mor is yowr meryte in the sygth of God. Pacyens is necessary unto yow for in that schal ye kepyn yowr sowle." Mych was the holy dalyawns that the ankres and this creatur haddyn be comownyng in the lofe of owyr Lord Jhesu Crist many days that thei were togedyr.

      Margery's meeting with Julian

    1. all

      First of all,

    2. as

      "as" is not necessary here. This is very minor mistake but since you are doing excellent job I am going to point out any mistake I find to contribute the project towards perfection.