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  1. Last 7 days
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPqjgN-pNDw


      When did the switch in commonplace book framing did the idea of "second brain" hit? (This may be the first time I've seen it personally. Does it appear in other places?) Sift through r/commonplace books to see if there are mentions there.


      By keeping one's commonplace in an analog form, it forces a greater level of intentionality because it's harder to excerpt material by hand. Doing this requires greater work than arbitrarily excerpting almost everything digitally. Manual provides a higher bar of value and edits out the lower value material.

    1. the biosphere is a fundamental basis for all human well-being and we have two 00:05:36 boundaries defined for the biosphere the first one is the conclusion that at least 50 to 60 percent of intact nature must be remained on Earth to be able to 00:05:48 support the world economy and the resilience of the entire Earth system the second boundary is for all the managed land agriculture forestry urban areas that at least 25 percent of every 00:06:00 square kilometer has to have natural levels of fluorine fauna to be able to remain healthy and support the economy

      !- Second boundary : biosphere - 50 to 60 percent of nature must remain intact - 25 percent of every kilometres of managed agricultural land must have natural and healthy levels of flora and fauna

  2. Jan 2023
    1. self-alienation that is if i think that i'm a self but i'm really a person that i really don't know who i am just as if i thought that a dollar had 01:02:13 its value intrinsically in the value of the paper and the ink i wouldn't understand anything about finance currency or purchases

      Second consequence : self alienation self

  3. Dec 2022
    1. I was talking to a friend of ours Steve Keen and he actually pointed this out to me. The second group is the Vikings. The Vikings are the group of people who are not interested in doing the work to create a new system. They understand the old system's coming apart, but they will take what they want while they can.

      !- second group : definition - Vikings - Understand things are falling apart but focused on maximizing self benefit during this upheavals

    1. To a large extent, we have failed to recognize that poverty places enormouseconomic, social, and psychological costs on the nonpoor as well as the poor.These costs affect us both individually and as a nation, although we have beenslow to recognize them. Too often, the attitude has been, “I don’t see how I’maffected, so why worry about it?”

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  4. Nov 2022
    1. In addition to each of your commitments being somewhere you trust, I want your plans to also be somewhere you trust. So any thinking you’ve done about what you’re working on, on all sorts of different time scales, that should be written down somewhere you trust and review regularly as well. I think that’s often overlooked.

      Your second brain should offload more than just the task management. It should also contain the context of those tasks.

  5. Oct 2022
    1. objects of experience 00:36:36 are causally natureless the second kind of naturelessness naturelessness with respect to production is to say they arise only through causal interactions as we've been discussing we don't encounter them in an immediate way 00:36:48 and the second nature the dependent nature of things is the fact that they don't exist independently of us but rather all of the phenomena we ever experience all of the objects in our 00:37:00 world are constructed through complex and here i want to emphasize opaque causal processes none of us really understands exactly how our minds construct the world in which we live even though we know that they construct 00:37:13 them and that means that the objects of our experience because we are constructing them are fundamentally non-dually related to us they are not things we detect they are constructions 00:37:24 in which we participate

      !- definition : second naturelessness -naturelessness with respect to production - no independent existence, only dependent origination

  6. Aug 2022
    1. The Western archive is characterised by two types of knowledge organisation that are foreign to Indigenous knowledges: Firstly it is based on a strong sense of dualism; the use of oppositional categories such as man/woman; man (human)/nature; mind/matter; spirit/materiality, which again is expressed in time differentiated into past/present/future. Secondly knowledge is objectified; it is knowledge about, not with, and it is highly segmented into different areas of knowledge speciality that are in turn reflected in the education system and the professions and areas of government responsibility.
    2. Margo Neale (featured at right) suggests that the Songlines project can be conceived as a Third Archive, a bridge between the First Archive of Indigenous knowledges, kept alive in the songlines that crisscross Australia, and the Second Archive, that of the Western Knowledge system, imported into Australia through colonisation and settlement and transmitted through our education systems and institutions of government, business and civil society.
    1. As Tiago Forte writes in his excellent book, ‘Building a Second Brain’, “every bit of energy we spend straining to recall things is energy not spent doing the thinking that only humans can do: inventing new things, crafting stories, recognising patterns, following our intuition, collaborating with others, investigating new subjects, making plans, testing theories”.

      This is exactly the kind of language that is driving people psychotic: that there's only 2 modes - recalling and creating. Yes, there are these 2 modes. But there are others too, the most important of which are "resting", "reflecting", and "gestating". Without these others, which we must visit in balance with recalling and creating, we will end up in a rubber room.

  7. Jul 2022
    1. anticipations is key to 01:08:38 everything and attention is key to everything so every organism does that plants and everything else and it doesn't require a central nervous system 01:08:51 and and you i might add to this that not only is every organism cognitive but essentially every organism organism is cooperative to those cooperation and cognition 01:09:03 go hand in hand because any intelligent organism any organism that can act to better its you know viability is going to cooperate in 01:09:17 meaningful ways with other organisms and you know other species and things like that nice point because um there's cost to communication whether it's exactly whether it's the cost of making the pheromone 01:09:30 or just the time which is super finite or attention fundamentally and so costly interactions through time the game theory are either to exploit and stabilize which is fragile 01:09:42 or to succeed together yeah exactly and and and succeeding together cooperation is is is like everywhere once you once you understand what you're looking 01:09:54 for it's in the biologic world it's like everywhere so this idea that we're you know one one one person against all or you know we're a dog eat dog universe i mean it's you 01:10:08 know in a certain sense it's true obviously tigers eat you know whatever they eat zebras or whatever i mean that happens yes of course but in the larger picture 01:10:19 over and over multiple time scales not just uh you know in five minutes but over evolutionary time scales and uh you know developmental time scales and everything the cooperation is really the rule 01:10:33 for the most part and if you need if any listener needs proof of that just think of who you think of your body i mean there's about a trillion some trillion some cells 01:10:45 that are enormously harmonious like your blood pumps every day or you know this is a this is like a miracle i don't want to use the word miracle because i want to get into 01:10:59 whatever that might imply but uh it is amazing aw inspiring the the depth of cooperation just in our own bodies is like that's that's like 01:11:12 evolution must prefer cooperation or else there would never be such a complex uh pattern of cooperation as we see just in one human body 01:11:26 just to give one example from the bees so from a species i study it's almost like a sparring type of cooperation because when it was discovered that there were some workers with developed ovaries 01:11:38 there was a whole story about cheating and policing and about altruism and this equation says this and that equation says that and then when you take a step back it's like the colony having a distribution of over-reactivation 01:11:51 may be more ecologically resilient so um i as an evolutionary biologist never think well my interpretation of what would be lovey-dovey in this system must be how it works because that's so 01:12:05 clearly not true it's just to say that there are interesting dynamics within and between levels and in the long run cooperation and stable cooperation and like learning to adapt 01:12:17 to your niche is a winning strategy in a way that locking down just isn't but unfortunately under high um stress and 01:12:29 uh high uncertainty conditions simple strategies can become rife so that's sort of a failure mode of the population

      The human, or ANY multicellular animal or plant body is a prime example of cooperation....billions of cells in cooperation with each other to regulate the body system.

      The body of any multi-cellular organism, whether flora or fauna is an example of exquisite cellular and microbial cooperation. A multi-cellular organism is itself a superorganism in this sense. And social organisms then constitute an additional layer of superorganismic behavior.

    2. second question is uh by what and this is as of course the the 00:57:57 kicker is not only what systems might be best but what how would you possibly uh implement them what viable way is there to implement new system designs you know 00:58:09 like otherwise what's the purpose you know this isn't this isn't an academic this isn't just an academic uh you know excursion this is like let's change the world and that has to be practical in some you 00:58:21 know in some has to be viable so those are the two questions what what what might be best and how do we get there
      1. For a given community, how do we practically implement such a system?
    3. the six 00:48:41 six big systems i've mentioned can be viewed as a cognitive architecture it's the it's the means by which the society learns decides adapts and 00:48:54 and this society's efforts this is the third underlying position the society's efforts to learn decide and adapt and be viewed as being driven by an intrinsic purpose and that's really key also 00:49:08 because it's not just that we're learning deciding and adapting willy-nilly i mean i mean maybe it seems that way in the world you know in the sense we're so dysfunctional it kind of is billy nilly but 00:49:20 but what really matters is that we learn decide and adapt in relation to whatever intrinsic purpose we actually have as as a society as individuals in a 00:49:34 society it's that it's it's it's it's as i will use the the term uh maybe several times today it's solving problems that matter that really that really 00:49:45 matter that's what we're after

      Second Proposition: The six thrusts or prmary societal systems are the cognitive architecture of the superorganism which it uses to sense the world

    4. what is second order science and i'm sure we're gonna again go into it in this like fractal convo but and how does everyone play a role in it right so 00:24:50 so traditional science would be first order science is the the scientist is removed from the experiment that is an observer to the experiment 00:25:03 maybe the scientist sets up the experiment but then steps back and watches the you know the results unfold and it just observes the results and then you know does the statistics or whatever on the results and 00:25:16 then records the the uh the knowledge gain the aim of that is to build knowledge and you know that's wonderful and fantastic and terribly useful and 00:25:29 important and that is mostly what science has done over the you know over the last few hundred years or so uh second order science is a little bit different it is 00:25:41 the science i would say that is really appropriate for for today for our problems today in second order science the the aim is to change 00:25:52 you know change the system change the it's more about unfoldment of an experiment rather than getting to the end a certain goal of an experiment the scientist is part of the experiment 00:26:05 it's reflective in nature it's intrinsically reflective and it and it really represents a partnership between the science world and and the stakeholders so it's a little bit more like 00:26:18 engineering in a sense as more of a flavor of engineering in that there's a group of stakeholders who want some you know want something to happen and uh the science world is engaged in 00:26:31 building that but it's part it's like a you know series of learning together and reflecting on what is important and what is of value 00:26:42 so it's very much value driven which which is unlike first order science it's not particularly value driven so the the the aim is to change and it's value driven and the science scientists are part of 00:26:55 the experiment really interesting that reminds me of of um working uh for the first time really closely with someone outside of academia and then their insistence to include stakeholders in the conversation very 00:27:11 early and that was something that i didn't see as a practice around me in academia so i didn't see it as an affordance i didn't see it as an opportunity in my projects and then when i kind of 00:27:22 was like well i could contact anyone early on potentially and maybe even include them in the project that's um then you realize how closely clustered 00:27:33 all not available have been organized and so it's really interesting and uh and as you pointed out like there still 00:27:52 is a role for the first order of science because it's sometimes you need to make the measurement like first order cybernetics the thermometer we need to keep the temperature range second order is it the 00:28:04 right thermometer you know third order should we even be tracking a thermometer there's a space right for all right what is what do we really want what do w what do we really value yeah and and maybe i should just inject here too that 00:28:17 um that you know it if if the science world is going to be involved in in a value question it 00:28:28 really just has to be like transparent out front like this is what we're doing as opposed to more uh you know obtuse we're actually making value statements 00:28:43 but we're sort of hiding them in first order science language you know so it just has to be transparent this is what we're doing this is what it's about we're we're learning together we're evolving solutions to 00:28:56 real problems that's that humanity has and uh everything is like transparent and clear and above board and if it's done that way then it's i think could be extremely useful and it's 00:29:11 is just what the world needs actually because there are serious serious as we'll talk about you know like overwhelmingly serious problems that we face i don't know how or if we can solve them 00:29:24 and if we're not engaging you know the scientific world some of the brightest minds on the planet if we're not engaging them then you know we're we're not going to get the kind of solutions that might be 00:29:36 you know i mean we're better off engaging the science world in these questions along with communities right because that yep i i was talking to you no no no it's fun that's fine this okay 00:29:50 yeah yeah okay just one short on that is it's actually a really respectful way for science to approach this question of like we'll be ready as scientists or as systems thinkers 00:30:01 or as modelers will come to the table of policy and value discussion when we have a transparent model that's actually going to be adding value rather than potentially 00:30:12 being a vector for some non-transparent force to have undue influence on discussions that really matter so it's it's um i hope this conversation helps people 00:30:24 rethink how science could be involved in these policy discussions because those are going to be the exact terms that we're going to be talking through so right right and when we talk about the second paper we'll get more 00:30:37 we'll talk a little bit more about uh second order science and its role and there's citations there for anyone that's that's interested

      "Second Order" science will be a critical kind of science to practice in this project. In this kind of science, the scientist is part of the experiment itself. It is value driven, in contrast to first order science.

    1. My Fortran professor gave me a low mark because I used a lookup table for octal to binary conversion, instead of using division and modulo.
    1. the conquest of the Americas was also a second human transition: an escape from agriculture to profit-driven enterprise: “Western Europeans began colonizing large areas of the rest of the world, creating the first globalized economy.” Lewis and Maslin call this the “Columbian exchange,” when humans, animals, plants, and microbes established themselves in places they had never been before. Energy from new foods, and information from printing, helped drive this new transition. Farming resumed in the Americas to feed and clothe the Europeans, using the labour of African slaves.

      Second Transition: Columbian Exchange

      In evolutionary biology, there are also another type of transition, Major Evolutionary Transitions (MET). Robin et. al propose that the introduction of writing (inscribed language) was a major information improvement that played an important role leading to a major system transition (MST).

      Major Evolutionary Transitions and the Roles of Facilitation and Information in Ecosystem Transformations https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.frontiersin.org%2Farticles%2F10.3389%2Ffevo.2021.711556%2Ffull&group=world https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2F6J-J72GoqhY%2F&group=world

  8. Jun 2022
    1. Raphael, you came up with thename of the course—and now the book.

      The origin of the phrase Building a Second Brain.

    2. Writers diverge by collecting raw material for the story they wantto tell, sketching out potential characters, and researching historicalfacts.

      Missing here is the creative divergence of creating plot points which could be later connected. This part of the process is incredibly difficult for many as seen in the poor second act development in most of narrative history. Beginnings and endings are usually incredibly easy, but the middle portions for connecting the two is incredibly hard.

      Is this because creating connections between the ends when there no intervening ideas to connect is nearly impossible? How can one brainstorm middle plot points so that they might be more easily connected?

    3. Tagging for personal knowledge management is a subject unto itself. Whilenot necessary to get started, I’ve written a free bonus chapter on tags you candownload at Buildingasecondbrain.com/bonuschapter.

      Forte's book is a pathway that acts as just another part of his sophisticated sales funnel.

    4. allyou’re doing is drawing on a growing library of Intermediate Packetsstored in your Second Brain.

      Intermediate Packets juxtaposed with Second Brain, it would have been better if he could have given a better analogy than intermediate packets to create some parallelism with Second Brain, alas... lack of creativity?

      Notice the importance he's giving to Intermediate Packets by artificially capitalizing it. An indication of attempt to commoditize and sell "note taking" as a product.

      link to https://hyp.is/OKlVhPBCEeyX96cojNH8rg/www.danah.org/name.html

    5. Intermediate Packets

      example of the creation of a buzz word for something not really quite necessary. It's useful to give names to things, but this is just a synonym for a note, isn't it?

      definitely not as developed as "second brain"

    6. If you ignore that inner voice of intuition, over time it will slowlyquiet down and fade away. If you practice listening to what it is tellingyou, the inner voice will grow stronger. You’ll start to hear it in allkinds of situations. It will guide you in what choices to make andwhich opportunities to pursue. It will warn you away from people andsituations that aren’t right for you. It will speak up and take a standfor your convictions even when you’re afraid.I can’t think of anything more important for your creative life—andyour life in general—than learning to listen to the voice of intuitioninside. It is the source of your imagination, your confidence, and yourspontaneity

      While we have evolved a psychological apparatus that often gives us good "gut feelings" (an actual physical "second brain"), we should listen careful to them, but we should also learn to think about, analyze, and verify these feelings so we don't fall prey to potential cognitive biases.

    1. As Lane put it, it's a Personal Information Storage System (PISS).

      What a zinger! 😜

    2. Tiago's book follows the general method of the commonplace book, but relies more heavily on a folder-based method and places far less emphasis and value on having a solid index. There isn't any real focus on linking ideas other than putting some things together in the same folder. His experience with the history of the space in feels like it only goes back to some early Ryan Holiday blog posts. He erroneously credits Luhmann with inventing the zettelkasten and Anne-Laure Le Cunff created digital gardens. He's already retracted these in sketch errata here: https://www.buildingasecondbrain.com/endnotes.

      I'll give him at least some credit that there is some reasonable evidence that he actually used his system to write his own book, but the number and depth of his references and experience is exceptionally shallow given the number of years he's been in the space, particularly professionally. He also has some interesting anecdotes and examples of various people including and array of artists and writers which aren't frequently mentioned in the note taking space, so I'll give him points for some diversity of players as well. I'm mostly left with the feeling that he wrote the book because of the general adage that "thought leaders in their space should have a published book in their area to have credibility". Whether or not one can call him a thought leader for "re-inventing" something that Rudolphus Agricola and Desiderius Erasmus firmly ensconced into Western culture about 500 years ago is debatable.

      Stylistically, I'd call his prose a bit florid and too often self-help-y. The four letter acronyms become a bit much after a while. It wavers dangerously close to those who are prone to the sirens' call of the #ProductivityPorn space.

      If you've read a handful of the big articles in the note taking, tools for thought, digital gardens, zettelkasten space, Ahren's book, or regularly keep up with r/antinet or r/Zettelkasten, chances are that you'll be sorely disappointed and not find much insight. If you have friends that don't need the horsepower of Ahrens or zettelkasten, then it might be a reasonable substitute, but then it could have been half the length for the reader.

    1. Note Sharers aka Digital Gardeners aka Second Brainers

      Example of a writer who wholly conflates "note sharers" with "digital gardners" and the "second brain" crowd.

      It's likely that these words and terminology have all become conflated due to ambiguous use.

    1. build a second brain

      Example of someone considering Building a Second Brain its "own system" rather than something from the commonplace book tradition.

    1. CAP laws were passed to protect children without taking away the Second Amendment right

      Requiring firearms to be locked such that they cannot be effectively used in an emergency has been found to violate the Second Amendment, so she's either ignorant or intentionally misleading.

    1. O sir, we should have fine times, indeed, if, to punish tyrants, it were only sufficient to assemble the people! Your arms, wherewith you could defend yourselves, are gone; and you have no longer an aristocratical, no longer a democratical spirit. Did you ever read of any revolution in a nation, brought about by the punishment of those in power, inflicted by those who had no power at all? You read of a riot act in a country which is called one of the freest in the world, where a few neighbors cannot assemble without the risk of being shot by a hired soldiery, the engines of despotism. We may see such an act in America.

      Oh the ironies of this as he was talking about a small proportion of the population at the time, a large swath of which (namely enslaved persons with no power) had no arms to protect themselves against him.

      His definition of "freemen" was painfully limiting for someone speaking about freedom in such lofty terms.

    1. “If they neglect or refuse”: “Document: Patrick Henry Speech BeforeVirginia Ratifying Convention (June 5, 1788),” Teaching American History.
    2. Professor Carl Bogus: Carl T. Bogus, “Was Slavery a Factor in the SecondAmendment?” e New York Times, May 24, 2018.

      Professor Carl Bogus: Carl T. Bogus, “Was Slavery a Factor in the Second Amendment?” The New York Times, May 24, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/24/opinion/second-amendment-slavery-james-madison.html

    3. Patrick Henry and George Mason: Dave Davies, “Historian Uncovers eRacist Roots of the 2nd Amendment,” NPR, June 2, 2021.

      https://www.npr.org/2021/06/02/1002107670/historian-uncovers-the-racist-roots-of-the-2nd-amendment

      Transcript: https://www.npr.org/transcripts/1002107670 Audio: <audio src="">

      <audio controls> <source src="https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/fa/2021/06/20210602_fa_01.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> <br />

      Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio. Here is a link to the audio instead.

      </audio>

    1. General Daniel E. Sickles, the commanding Union officer enforcing Reconstruction in South Carolina, ordered in January 1866 that “the constitutional rights of all loyal and well-disposed inhabitants to bear arms will not be infringed.” When South Carolinians ignored Sickles’s order and others like it, Congress passed the Freedmen’s Bureau Act of July 1866, which assured ex-slaves the “full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings concerning personal liberty … including the constitutional right to bear arms.”
    2. After losing the Civil War, Southern states quickly adopted the Black Codes, laws designed to reestablish white supremacy by dictating what the freedmen could and couldn’t do. One common provision barred blacks from possessing firearms. To enforce the gun ban, white men riding in posses began terrorizing black communities. In January 1866, Harper’s Weekly reported that in Mississippi, such groups had “seized every gun and pistol found in the hands of the (so called) freedmen” in parts of the state. The most infamous of these disarmament posses, of course, was the Ku Klux Klan.
    1. The Mulford Act was a 1967 California bill that prohibited public carrying of loaded firearms without a permit.[2] Named after Republican assemblyman Don Mulford, and signed into law by governor of California Ronald Reagan, the bill was crafted with the goal of disarming members of the Black Panther Party who were conducting armed patrols of Oakland neighborhoods, in what would later be termed copwatching.[3][4] They garnered national attention after Black Panthers members, bearing arms, marched upon the California State Capitol to protest the bill.

      WTF!

    1. Elie Mystal writes in Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy's Guide to the Constitution:

      There was an original purpose to the Second Amendment, but it wasn't to keep people safe. It was to preserve white supremacy and slavery. (p36)

      He indicates that there are quotes from Patrick Henry and George Mason, governor of Virginia. They needed the ability to raise an armed militia to put down slave revolts and didn't want to rely on the federal government to do it.


      • [ ] Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy's Guide to the Constitution by Elie Mystal #wanttoread

      link to 1967 Mulford Act signed by Ronald Reagan see also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulford_Act

  9. May 2022
    1. There are four essential capabilities that we can rely on a SecondBrain to perform for us:1. Making our ideas concrete.2. Revealing new associations between ideas.3. Incubating our ideas over time.4. Sharpening our unique perspectives.

      Does the system really do each of these? Writing things down for our future selves is the thing that makes ideas concrete, not the system itself. Most notebooks don't reveal new associations, we actively have to do that ourselves via memory or through active search and linking within the system itself. The system may help, but it doesn't automatically create associations nor reveal them. By keeping our ideas in one place they do incubate to some extent, but isn't the real incubation taking place in a diffuse way in our minds to come out later?

    2. your Second Brain is a privateknowledge collection designed to serve a lifetime of learning andgrowth, not just a single use case

      Based on Tiago Forte's definition of a second brain the primary distinction from a commonplace book is solely that it is digital.

      Note here that he explicitly defines a second brain as being private. Historically commonplace books were private affairs though there are examples of them being shared from person to person as well as examples that have been printed.

    3. This digital commonplace book is what I call a Second Brain

      Tiago Forte directly equates a "digital commonplace book" with his concept of a "Second Brain" in his book Building a Second Brain.


      Why create a new "marketing term" for something that should literally be commonplace!

    4. Now, this eye-opening and accessible guide shows how you caneasily create your own personal system for knowledge management,otherwise known as a Second Brain.

      Marketing speech to convert an old idea (commonplacing) into a new siloed service one needs to pay for.

    5. Forte, Tiago. Building a Second Brain: A Proven Method to Organize Your Digital Life and Unlock Your Creative Potential. Atria Books, 2022. https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Building-a-Second-Brain/Tiago-Forte/9781982167387.

    1. software engineers who do web development are by far among the worst at actually evaluating solutions based on their engineering merit

      There's plenty of irrationality to be found in opposing camps, too. I won't say that it's actually worse (because it's not), but it's definitely a lot more annoying, because it usually also carries overtones that there's a sort of well-informed moral and technological high ground—when it turns out it's usually just a bunch of second panel thinkers who themselves don't even understand computers (incl. compilers, system software, etc.) very well.

      This is what makes it hard to have discussions about reforming the practices in mainstream Web development. The Web devs are doing awful things, but at least ~half of the criticism that these devs are actually exposed to ends up being junk because lots of the critics unfortunately just have no fucking idea what they're talking about and are nowhere near the high ground they think they're standing on—often taking things for granted that just don't make sense when actually considered in terms of the technological uppercrust that they hope to invoke. Just a kneejerk "browser = bad" association from people who can't meaningfully distinguish between JS (the language), browser APIs, and the NPM corpus (though most NPM programmers are usually guilty of exactly the same...).

      It's a very "the enemy of my enemy is not my friend" sort of thing.

    1. Second, we shape the work before giving it to a team. A small senior group works in parallel to the cycle teams. They define the key elements of a solution before we consider a project ready to bet on. Projects are defined at the right level of abstraction: concrete enough that the teams know what to do, yet abstract enough that they have room to work out the interesting details themselves.

  10. Apr 2022
    1. I previously shared Ivo Velitchkov’s 5-part series in Letter XXXII where he described in more detail his approach, and how he developed RIO (Roam Internal Ontology). Now, he has released the two ontologies he's developed (RIO and ROCO - ROam Core Ontology)

      It really kills me to see these types of jargon and acronyms popping up in the technology space around note taking. What do these really mean? Why should the average user care? It all feels like the sort of careless marketing and buzzwords like "second brain" or "MOC" (maps of content).

    1. Gerard Tellis and Peter Golder, both professors of marketing, conducted ahistorical analysis of fifty consumer product categories (including diapers, fromwhich the Pampers versus Chux example was taken). Their results showed thatthe failure rate of “market pioneers” is an alarming 47 percent, while the meanmarket share they capture is only 10 percent. Far better than being first, Tellisand Golder concluded, is being what some have called a “fast second”: an agileimitator. Companies that capitalize on others’ innovations have “a minimalfailure rate” and “an average market share almost three times that of marketpioneers,” they found. In this category they include Timex, Gillette, and Ford,firms that are often recalled—wrongly—as being first in their field.
  11. Mar 2022
    1. If you don't like Zettlekasten (I have my "own" version of Zettlekasten that I use so it's not 100% the original, but it's very heavily based on it - if you hate Zettlekasten this really isn't going to work). 

      https://elizabethfilips.podia.com/validation-cohort-muse

      Elizabeth Filips is running a validation cohort for a course (presumably called MUSE, the marketing name for her "system" as well) on how to take notes and build a zettelkasten (or a second brain—there's evidence that she's taken Tiago Forte's course). She's got some indications that she's using a zettelkasten-like method for creation, but her burgeoning empire also appears to be firmly centered in the productivity porn space. I'm curious how she views her Muse system being different from a zettelkasten?

      She's got an incredibly focused sales funnel web presence here.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnFHwl2Dbr0

      • System should be as frictionless as possible.
      • Capture in one location. (She says as few as possible, but this is too wishy-washy: she's got a "Readwise page" and a "Links page".)
      • There needs to be levels of processing.
        • Split out based on future value.
      • Everything has resources. How to capture metadata and be able to cite it?

      Everything needs to have a "Why"? What is the context for capturing? What is the reason? How will it be used in the future? Why was it interesting?

      She also describes how she collects notes in various formats (books, online articles, Kindle, Twitter, etc.) It primarily involves using Notion along with a variety of other sub-applications including Instapaper for sharing to Notion.

      Dramatically missing from this presentation is the answer to the question "why" collect all this stuff? How is she using it in the future? What is the overall value? She touches on writing the why for herself as she's taking notes, but I get the impression that she's not actively practicing what she preaches, and I suspect that many don't. This leaves me with the impression that she's collecting with no end goal, which for many may be fine.

      She's got a gaping hole in the processing section which likely needs a video unto itself and which would probably go a long way toward answer the "why" question above.

      In looking at her other videos, I see she's using the phrase "second brain" and words like productivity. There seems to be a high level of disconnect between those using "second brain" and the "why do this?" question other than the simple idea of "productivity" which seems to be a false trap that gets people into the mindset of being a collector for collections' sake.


      Almost hilariously she's got videos with titles like: - "I'm a productivity guru and I hate it." - "Productivity YouTube is brainwashing you"


      She's titled the final portion of the video "Outro" which is actually displayed on the video UI. This might be useful for production purposes but should be changed or omitted for actual consumption.


      The title "How I Remember Everything I Read" is pure clickbait here. It's more aptly titled, "How I Take and Save Notes". Where's the how I use this after? or how I review over it all to actually remember it/memorize it? There's nothing here to support this end of things which is the promise given in the title.

    1. “This is what the Lord says— Israel’s King and Redeemer, the Lord Almighty: I am the first and I am the last; apart from me there is no God” (Isaiah 44:6).

      Jewish monotheism doesn't emerge until the end of the Babylonian Exile (~586 - 500 BCE) period and the beginning of the Second Temple period (500 BCE - 70 CE) when the religion moves from acknowledging the existence of other gods to saying there is only one god. (Isaiah 44:6).

  12. Feb 2022
    1. Learnings: - It's easy to assume people in the past didn't care or were stupid. But people do things for a reason. Not understanding the reason for how things are is a missed learning opportunity, and very likely leads to unintended consequences. - Similar to having a valid strong opinion, one must understand why things are as they are before changing them (except if the goal is only signaling).

    1. The Workflow: How to Use the Zettelkasten Method

      The entire basis and process of the Zettelkasten method. - Capture - Elaborate - Connect

  13. Jan 2022
    1. I go through my old posts every day. I know that much – most? – of them are not for the ages. But some of them are good. Some, I think, are great. They define who I am. They're my outboard brain.

      Cory Doctorow calls his blog and its archives his "outboard brain".

  14. Dec 2021
    1. As a result of extensive work with this technique a kind of secondary memory will arise, an alter ego with who we can constantly communicate.

      I want to look at the original German for this sentence, particularly with respect to the translation of the phrase "secondary memory". Is the translation semantic or literal? Might the original German have been a more literal "second brain"?

      Compare this to the one or two other examples of this sort of translation from the German.

    1. In a short academic dissertation on the art of excerpts, Andreas Stübel described the card index as a ‘secondary and subsidiary memory’ (‘memoria secundaria and subsidiaria’), summing up in just three words the dilemma scholars had been struggling with for two centuries with respect to the use of commonplace books.28 As far as I know, Stübel was the first among contem-poraries to speak of secondary memory.

      28 Andreas M. Stübel, Exercitatio academica de excerptis adornandis (Leipzig, 1684), 33

      Andreas M. Stübel, in Exercitatio academica de excerptis adornandis (Leipzig, 1684), becomes the first to of many to speak about the idea of "secondary memory".

      I like this idea better than Tiago Forte's marketing term "second brain."

    2. In fact, the methodical use of notebooks changed the relationship between natural memory and artificial memory, although contemporaries did not immediately realize it. Historical research supports the idea that what was once perceived as a memory aid was now used as secondary memory.18

      During the 16th century there was a transition in educational centers from using the natural and artificial memories to the methodical use of notebooks and commonplace books as a secondary memory saved by means of writing.

      This allows people in some sense to "forget" what they've read and learned and be surprised by it again later. They allow themselves to create liminal memories which may be refreshed and brought to the center later. Perhaps there is also some benefit in this liminal memory for allowing ideas to steep on the periphery before using them. Perhaps combinatorial creativity happens unconsciously?

      Cross reference: learning research by Barbara Oakley and Terry Sejnowski.

  15. Nov 2021
    1. Le chef d'établissement réunit, au cours du premier trimestre, les responsables des listes de candidats qui ont obtenu des voix lors de l'élection des représentants de parents d'élèves au conseil d'administration, pour désigner les deux délégués titulaires et les deux délégués suppléants des parents d'élèves de chaque classe, à partir des listes qu'ils présentent à cette fin. Le chef d'établissement répartit les sièges compte tenu des suffrages obtenus lors de cette élection
    1. Assenting to the “self-evident truth” maintained in the American Declaration of Independence, “that all men are created equal, and endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,”

      Self evident truth might be referring to the Bible.. "All men were created equal" But slaves were treated with no respect what so ever

    1. When we look at the Zettelkasten, it looks quite inconspicuous and small and doesn't give away the secret. The outer appearance is trivial, so what is it then that made Luhmann refer to it as his second brain.

      the translation for "second brain" is direct? Does he provide a source for where this was recorded? It's the first time I've heard the phrase outside of Tiago Forte's use.

  16. Oct 2021
    1. But when our hypothetical Blub programmer looks in the other direction, up the power continuum, he doesn't realize he's looking up.

      We have a word for this: "sophomoric".

    1. Japan is the eleventh-most populous country in the world, as well as one of the most densely populated and urbanized. About three-fourths of the country's terrain is mountainous, concentrating its population of 125.36 million on narrow coastal plains. Japan is divided into 47 administrative prefectures and eight traditional regions. The Greater Tokyo Area is the most populous metropolitan area in the world, with more than 37.4 million residents.

      This is the second paragraph

  17. Sep 2021
    1. ties. So also is "that slothful spending the Morning in Bed": The necessity of early rising would reduce the poor to a necessity of going to Bed betime; and thereby prevent the Danger of Midnight revels. Early rising would also "introduce an exact Regularity into their Families, a wonderful Order into their Oeconomy". The catalogue is

      I wonder what effects this shift in time and industry had on causing the disappearance of the idea of first and second sleeps?

      Cross reference: https://www.sciencealert.com/humans-used-to-sleep-in-two-shifts-maybe-we-should-again

    1. You exhaust me with your foolishness and reward my efforts with nothing but pain, do you understand me?"

      does she mean im sick of you not understanding what i mean but understand what i say ?

  18. Jul 2021
    1. This bucket’s for you and for you alone. It’s your idiosyncratic partner in knowledge work. Your second brain. Your extended memory and your better self.

      Note the use here of "second brain" written in 2013 before Tiago Forte's use of the idea.

  19. Jun 2021
    1. Article 1Modifié par Décret n°2012-16 du 5 janvier 2012, v. init.La composition de la commission d'appel prévue à l'article 13 du décret du 14 juin 1990 susvisé est fixée comme suit :- le directeur académique des services de l'éducation nationale agissant sur délégation du recteur d'académie, ou son représentant choisi parmi ceux de ses collaborateurs appartenant aux corps d'inspection ou de direction, président ;- deux chefs d'établissement du type d'établissement scolaire concerné ;- trois professeurs exerçant au niveau scolaire concerné ; - un conseiller principal d'éducation ou un conseiller d'éducation ;- un directeur de centre d'information et d'orientation ; - trois représentants des parents d'élèves. La commission peut s'adjoindre un médecin de santé scolaire et une assistante sociale scolaire.Les membres de la commission d'appel sont nommés par le directeur académique des services de l'éducation nationale agissant sur délégation du recteur d'académie pour une durée d'un an renouvelable, sur proposition des associations en ce qui concerne les représentants des parents d'élèves. Dans les mêmes conditions, le directeur académique des services de l'éducation nationale agissant sur délégation du recteur d'académie désigne un nombre égal de suppléants des représentants des parents d'élèves.
  20. May 2021
    1. In one of my internship, I got to befriend a level 2 tech support, so learned a couple thing of how it worked (in that company). Level 1 was out-sourced, and they had a script to go from, regularly updated. From statistics, this took care of 90% of issues. Level 2 was a double handful of tech people, they had basic troubleshooting tools and knowledge and would solve 90% of the remaining issues. Level 3 was the engineering department (where I was), and as a result of level 1 and 2 efficiency less than 1% of issues ever got escalated. The process worked!
    2. Large companies especially deal with the massive volume of tech support calls they receive by employing some staff on lower pay as a "buffer," dealing with simple or "known" issues so that they don't need to employ as many higher paid "second line" support staff.
  21. Apr 2021
  22. Mar 2021
  23. Feb 2021
    1. Holder, J., Stevis-Gridneff, M., & McCann, A. (2020, December 4). Europe’s Deadly Second Wave: How Did It Happen Again? The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/12/04/world/europe/europe-covid-deaths.html