833 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Braud, M., Gaboriaud, A., Ferry, T., Mardi, W. E., Silva, L. D., Lemouzy, M., Guttierrez, J., Petit, S., Szabelska, A., & IJzerman, H. (2021). COVID-19-related conspiracy beliefs and their relationship with perceived stress and pre-existing conspiracy beliefs in a Prolific Academic sample: A replication and extension of Georgiou et al. (2020). PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/t62s7

  2. May 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘@taylorgrayson @skepticscience @ClimateOfGavin @kostas_exarhia I guess this depends on what kind of misinformation/’conspiracy" you are faced with. In the context of climate denial, there is evidence that understanding of expert consensus can impact belief @STWOrg" / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 19 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1361608256486047748

  3. Apr 2021
    1. Exercise can tackle symptoms of schizophrenia

      Not only am I unsurprised by this, but I'd be surprised if it were otherwise. The logic is that schizophrenia is a sleep disorder, and exercise enhances sleep. Additionally, lack of movement is one of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Therefore, this poverty of movement may play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia symptoms.

      I need to start a google search document with predictions prior to actually searching. It will slow down my research speed, but it is necessary in order to provide unbiased data on my intuitive understanding of diseases. It seems like the majority of my strong intuitions are true. Edit: I'll just record the search phrase in my hypothes.is notes. This one was "exercise schizophrenia"

    1. A reproduction of Carroll’snotes on his number alphabet will be found in Warren Weaver’s arti-cle “Lewis Carroll: Mathematician,” inScientific Americanfor April1956.)

      I need to track down this reference and would love to see what Weaver has to say about the matter.

      Certainly Weaver would have spoken of this with Claude Shannon (or he'd have read it).

  4. Mar 2021
    1. If those problems are planetary, then trying to cohere them around the game theory dynamics of locally embedded sovereign zones called countries disables the paths that should be open.
    1. graph theory is the study of graphs, which are mathematical structures used to model pairwise relations between objects
    1. In each of the games moves are entirely determined by chance; there is no opportunity to make decisions regarding play. (This, of course, is one reason why most adults with any intellectual capacity have little interest in playing the games for extended times, especially since no money or alcohol is involved.)

      The entire motivation for this study.

    1. Hornsey, M. J., Harris, E. A., & Fielding, K. S. (2018). The psychological roots of anti-vaccination attitudes: A 24-nation investigation. Health Psychology: Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 37(4), 307–315. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000586

    1. He introduces the idea of the apophatic: what we can't put into words, but is important and vaguely understood. This term comes from Orthodox theology, where people defined god by saying what it was not.

      Too often as humans we're focused on what is immediately in front of us and not what is missing.

      This same thing plagues our science in that we're only publishing positive results and not negative results.

      From an information theoretic perspective, we're throwing away half (or more?) of the information we're generating. We might be able to go much farther much faster if we were keeping and publishing all of our results in better fashion.

      Is there a better word for this negative information? #openquestions

    1. WellAlwaysHaveParis il y a 7 ans • Testament to the power of the Internet...Leonard Bernstein has been dead for 23 years, and yet his knowledge, insight and wisdom perpetually echo forward for future generations.  This video was probably lost in an attic somewhere before somebody decided to drop it on YouTube.  It warms my heart that 59,000+ people have seen it.

      Recordings from the whole lecture series by “born teacher” Leonard Bernstein has been “making the rounds”, thanks in part to YouTubers like Adam Neely who has been linking to those videos in descriptions of some of his episodes.

      Part of the reason the series interests me for its #PedagogicalHeritage is that it extend Bernstein’s role, who’s been mostly known as a composer and conductor. These really are lectures, delivered on campus. At the beginning of the first lecture, Bernstein explicitly described his relationship to Harvard and his being “petrified” at lecturing there. His outside status is important. In music, it’s not uncommon for lectures to be given by renowned musical experts without the academic #credentials which usually serve to “qualify” a prof. According to his bio (archive), LB was a visiting prof at Brandeis in the 1950s. When he delivered those lectures on campus, he was “Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard”. The lectures were a significant part of the deal. There’s a direct continuity between the lecturer’s experience and the delivery of “teaching material”. In another context, the research behind those lectures might not have qualified a prof for tenure.

      There’s quite a bit about prestige to unpack, there. And more than a little about “The Canon”. If I use excerpts from this series in my teaching, I’ll likely start from that: who was Bernstein? Why does it matter that we hear his voice instead of somebody else’s? What learning affordances from these recordings, including the musical examples performed on the piano? The context would likely be my beloved ethnomusicology course. Otherwise, some kind of course about “broad approaches to music theorization”.

      What strikes me in this comment (and in the “well, actually…” reply) is the very notion that the Internet gives us access to something valuable. Yet this access might be taken away at a moment’s notice (the ways of the DMCA are impenetrable). Yes, DVDs exist and the content might be retrieved. It’s technically possible to make backups of those videos. Yet the 5Rs of Open Content aren’t obvious, here.

      Although, Neely did remix some of the content.

  5. Feb 2021
    1. most students did not report study strategies that correlated with their VARK assessment, and that student performance in anatomy was not correlated with their score in any VARK categories. Rather, some specific study strategies (irrespective of VARK results), such as use of the virtual microscope, were found to be positively correlated with final class grade. However, the alignment of these study strategies with VARK results had no correlation with anatomy course outcomes. Thus, this research provides further evidence that the conventional wisdom about learning styles should be rejected by educators and students alike.

      It's unusual that researchers will make such definitive claims about the outcome of a study.

    1. Though rarer in computer science, one can use category theory directly, which defines a monad as a functor with two additional natural transformations. So to begin, a structure requires a higher-order function (or "functional") named map to qualify as a functor:

      rare in computer science using category theory directly in computer science What other areas of math can be used / are rare to use directly in computer science?

    1. It's hard to say why people think so because you certainly don't need to know category theory for using them, just like you don't need it for, say, using functions.
    1. The main purpose of this book is to go one step forward, not onlyto use the principle of maximum entropy in predicting probabilitydistributions, but to replace altogether the concept of entropy withthe more suitable concept of information, or better yet, the missinginformation (MI).

      The purpose of this textbook

    2. Thereare also a few books on statistical thermodynamics that use infor-mation theory such as those by Jaynes, Katz, and Tribus.

      Books on statistical thermodynamics that use information theory.

      Which textbook of Jaynes is he referring to?

    3. Levine, R. D. and Tribus, M (eds) (1979),The Maximum Entropy Principle,MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

      Book on statistical thermodynamics that use information theory, mentioned in Chapter 1.

    4. Katz, A. (1967),Principles of Statistical Mechanics: The Informational TheoryApproach,W.H.Freeman,London.

      Books on statistical thermodynamics that use information theory.

    1. 21st Century Economics (USA)

      Economic Theory of a Market Economy, Characteristics, Pros, and Cons

      Americans and the World believe or want to believe that the United States is built upon a Market Economy.

      Historical context validates a classic Market Economy theory as directed by our Founding Fathers and Constitution. We clearly do not have a pure Market Economy today (2021).

      • To Big to Fail - (Bailouts)
      • Farm Subsidies
      • Political Influence (money, lobbying, tenure)
      • Government Agencies
      • Military/Industrial Complex
      • Federal Reserve (Central Banking)
      • Social Security
      • Medicare
      • Other

      Most Americans lump (through education) the concept of economics and government together, into 3 basic categories; Capitalism, Socialism and Communism.

      The U.S. is a Capitalist Nation with a corresponding market economy.

      Is this statement Fact or Hypothesis ?

      Can we still rely on textbook economic models in the 21st Century?

  6. parsejournal.com parsejournal.com
    1. ost-humanist perspective that foregrounds the apparatuses within which possibilities for action and judgement take shape, and confront visitors with the complex ways in which they are part of these systems and networks. How to be a responsible node in an Actor-Network?
    1. cultural capital

      Introduced by Pierre Bourdieu in the 1970s, the concept has been utilized across a wide spectrum of contemporary sociological research. Cultural capital refers to ‘knowledge’ or ‘skills’ in the broadest sense. Thus, on the production side, cultural capital consists of knowledge about comportment (e.g., what are considered to be the right kinds of professional dress and attitude) and knowledge associated with educational achievement (e.g., rhetorical ability). On the consumption side, cultural capital consists of capacities for discernment or ‘taste’, e.g., the ability to appreciate fine art or fine wine—here, in other words, cultural capital refers to ‘social status acquired through the ability to make cultural distinctions,’ to the ability to recognize and discriminate between the often-subtle categories and signifiers of a highly articulated cultural code. I'm quoting here from (and also heavily paraphrasing) Scott Lash, ‘Pierre Bourdieu: Cultural Economy and Social Change’, in this reader.

    1. he most famous illustration of how the name of a substance is supposed to function in this way is provided not by Kripke, but by Putnam, another leading proponent of the ‘theory of direct reference’. Putnam asks us to imagine a Twin Earth – just like our Earth – which contains doppelgängers of us humans. The only difference between the two Earths is that on Twin Earth the clear, thirst-quenching, etc liquid that fills the oceans, lakes and rivers is not the chemical substance H2O, but another substance – XYZ. Suppose it’s 1750, before the chemical composition of water was discovered. On both Earths, the inhabitants call their liquid ‘water’. And, because it’s 1750, they associate the same mental checklist with that term: both think of ‘water’ as the substance that’s clear, thirst-quenching, boils at 100°C and so on. Now suppose a glass of XYZ is brought from Twin Earth to Earth and presented to Locke. Locke would believe it’s water, because it would tick his mental checklist. But would it be water? Not according to Putnam. Intuitively, that’s merely water-like stuff in the glass, not water. Putnam concludes that, while the term ‘water’ is associated with the same descriptions on Earth and Twin Earth, it has different meanings and picks out different chemical kinds. It is, and was, a necessary condition of something being water that it be H2O, despite this condition not being known back in 1750.
  7. Jan 2021
    1. Why was the change even made, if statistical performance is not improved and the code is just harder to understand? Conspiracy theorists could get the idea of a backdoor (:
    1. the commonplace book has been particularly beloved by poets, whose business is the revelation of wholeness through the fragmentary

      Gestalt: the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. See also, emergence in chaos theory and complexity.

  8. Dec 2020
    1. Dr. Chu recommends saying to yourself “I can or I get to learn” to see attending school as opportunities and choices that we shouldn’t take for granted.

      Change your thinking of a task from an obligation to an opportunity

    2. Sanders explains that often when parents see that a child does not appear to be motivated, they tend to place blame and judge. Instead, she recommends that parents should be curious about what is going on and try to work collaboratively by problem-solving.

      Great Parenting.

      Try to understand why your kid has problems with motivations, maybe along the self-determination theory route (autonomy, relatedness, and competency).

      Try to see if your child has a sense of control of the situation, what skills they have or are lacking to tackle the issue, and if they feel heard and connected.

    3. “Autonomy and relatedness are often missed in household tasks. People say to themselves ‘I have to clean or do laundry’ and this thinking reduces our sense of autonomy,” he said.How to overcome it:Dr. Chu says that we can overcome this lack of motivation for household tasks by enhancing autonomy.“Say to yourself ‘I can or I get to clean’ which changes your thinking of household tasks as opportunities and choices that we shouldn’t take for granted.”

      The way we phrase our motivations is a large part in whether we can get it done.

      Say we phrase our chores as something we 'have' to do then we lose our sense of autonomy or control over the situation. This leads to us less likely to do the task as it is something we are compelled to finish. If we rephrase it to "I get to do my chores" then the sense of autonomy returns as now chores are an oppurinity that I can take advantage of.

    4. Dr. Chu explains that self-determination theory states that three basic psychological needs — autonomy, competence, and relatedness — need to be satisfied for people to be intrinsically motivated.

      Self-Determination Theory says we have 3 psychological needs

      1.Autonomy- Having the ability to make your own choices

      2.Competence- The feeling that you have the skills needed to succeed

      3.Relatedness- Sense of feeling connected with others

    5. “Self-determination theory proposes that the quality, rather than solely the quantity, of motivation influences how people act,” says Dr. Tsz Lun (Alan) Chu, sports psychologist

      The Self-determination theory says that the quality and not the quantity of motivation determines how we action

  9. gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu
    1. Since most of the power produced in the electrophoretic process is dissipated as heat the following detrimental effects can result: • an increased rate of diffusion of sample and buffer ions leading to broadening of the separated samples • the formation of convection currents, which leads to mixing of separated samples; • thermal instability of samples that are rather sensitive to heat (e.g. denaturation of DNA) • a decrease of buffer viscosity hence a reduction in the resistance of the medium
    1. The settlement of the res-titution claims made by the Italian government against the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Getty Museum in Malibu, and the Cleveland Museum of Art and the return to Italy of looted antiquities raise ques-tions about the integrity of some museum directors and trustees – well-informed people whom one would expect to be the guardians and defenders of the past, not par-ticipants in the commercial processes which lead to its destruction.

      The museum directors definitely should know and have some subject area expertise here, but likely the trustees wouldn't have. While the museum directors should educate them, the financial position the trustees have will almost always tend to drown out the better angels of the museum directors who rely on those trustees' support.

      Part of the question is how to redesign the structural support underpinning the system to help ensure more ethical outcomes.

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  10. Nov 2020
    1. Understanding the factors that promote intrinsic motivation can help you see how it works and why it can be beneficial. These factors include:Curiosity. Curiosity pushes us to explore and learn for the sole pleasure of learning and mastering.Challenge. Being challenged helps us work at a continuously optimal level work toward meaningful goals.Control. This comes from our basic desire to control what happens and make decisions that affect the outcome.Recognition. We have an innate need to be appreciated and satisfaction when our efforts are recognized and appreciated by others.Cooperation. Cooperating with others satisfies our need for belonging. We also feel personal satisfaction when we help others and work together to achieve a shared goal.Competition. Competition poses a challenge and increases the importance we place on doing well.Fantasy. Fantasy involves using mental or virtual images to stimulate your behavior. An example is a virtual game that requires you to answer a question or solve a problem to move to the next level. Some motivation apps use a similar approach

      factors that [[promote [[intrinsic motivation]]]]

    2. Along with satisfying these underlying psychological needs, intrinsic motivation also involves seeking out and engaging in activities that we find challenging, interesting, and internally rewarding without the prospect of any external reward.

      moving up [[Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs]] - [[Self Actualization]], [[Esteem]], [[Love and Belonging]] - and these are also factors that can influence [[Intrinsic Motivation]]