25 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Feb 2019
    1. where by chance there arose a question, whether any liquor passed through the filaments of the nerves.

      Whereby drunk rhetoric takes on mixed modes

    2. mixed modes

      I think I'm figuring out the mixed modes thing. For Locke, a "mixed mode" refers to abstraction, words that attempt to represent concepts not found in the natural world. Or at least, there's not a one-to-one, sign-to-signifier relationship in the natural world for concepts like good or bad.

  3. Dec 2018
  4. Apr 2018
    1. Boris Bikes

      Boris Bikes were created by Boris Johnson as an alternative mode of transport that is eco friendly and promote the idea of healthy living. However, they cost money, money that many people cannot afford to splurge on.

  5. Mar 2018
    1. ltngu1stte, visual, aural, gestural, and spatial-which they found could be

      In "Forty Years Later, the Golden Record Goes Vinyl" is an interesting article because it incorporates three of the five mutlimodal modes which are linguistic, visual, and aural. The Golden Record originally was not intended for human consumption but after several years later it was. The Golden Record was created in several different languages so that many people would be able to understand.

  6. Jul 2017
    1. f class relations between owners of property and non-owners of property is essentially the same as in the earlier class-based modes of produc

      This resembles the ancient mode of production where there are only two classes, the ones that own property and the ones that doesn't

    2. The ancient mode of production

      The main structure of ancient modes of production splits people into masters and slaves.

    3. n the ancient, feudal and capitalist modes -there are just two classes that matter. These are the class that owns the means of production -it is their property -and the class that does not own it.

      This defines what separates people in different classes. In the Ancient modes of production, classes are separated by owning property.

    4. theprimitive communist, ancient, feudal, capitalist and communistmodes

      According to Marx, these are the five modes of production. However, Marx believes that there are actually only 2 modes of production, which is communism and non-communism. He believes that all non-communism modes of production are in the process of becoming modes of production.

    5. These different ways of producing goods Marx called modesofproduction.Thefiveare(inchronologicalorder):theprimitive communist, ancient, feudal, capitalist and communistmodes

      successive stages in a society's developmen known as modes of production

    6. t one of five different ways of organiz- ing production. These different ways of producing goods Marx called modesofproduction.Thefiveare(inchronologicalorder):theprimitive communist, ancient, feudal, capitalist and communistmodes

      The way that society is organized to produce goods, categorized based on social relations between consumers, producers and owners of the means of production (machinery, raw material, human labor etc.). Marx imagined early production systems as early versions of communism -- thereby imagined a reversion of society to a previous organization of labor -- while the stages in between are characterized by the exploitation of labor between classes.

    1. Modes of Production

      Socities developmental stages that are successive: Primitive Communism, Slave Society (ancient), Feudalism, Capitalism, Communism

      this a type of economic system, that is about all the different ways humans produce the means of survival (the needs) and enhance socialness. history is then characterized by predominant methods production. there then will be succesive socities in evolving patterns formed

    2. Superstructure

      these are the ideas and culture of a given stage which are derived from the modes of production

    3. Classes, Class Exploitation, Class Struggle

      Marx proposes that history is made of up stages driven by class conflict where there is an ownership class which controls the means of production and a lower class that thus provides labor for production. One class is thus exploiting another class. When these two come into conflict it leads to social change.

  7. Feb 2017
    1. One can imagine a man who is totally deaf and has never had a sensation of sound: and music.

      Locke identifies a similar problem in his own writing, but unlike Nietzsche, refuses to address it further: "Words having naturally no signification, the idea which each stands for must be learned and retained, by those who would exchange thoughts, and hold intelligible discourse with others...Those [words] which are not intelligible at all, such as names standing for any simple ideas which another has not organs of faculties to attain; as the names of colours to a blind man, or sounds to a deaf man need not here be mentioned...for if we examine them, we shall find that the names of mixed modes are most liable to doubtfulness and imperfection."

      Although Locke doesn't delve much deeper into this, I do like how he notes that some words are used to describe "mixed modes" like music and color. Nietzsche addresses this concept below, saying that although a man might be deaf, he can still "feel" music (via vibrations) and therefore might understand sound in a way that is divergent from the conventional manner. I'm also reminded of Rickert's piece, in which he noted that Homer could never identify the color "blue" as we understand it today, instead calling the color of the sea "purple" or "wine red."

    1. Rhetoric conveys the re-sults of thought, but it is not itself a form of thought. Hill relies on the modes of dis-course-narration, description, and argumentation-and he wishes to focus rhetoric on iL'i proper subject, excluding all that is peripheml.

      Like Enlightenment thinking, this suggests that knowledge and truth is objective, separate from social interaction. We don't actively create truth through communication, but rather passively gain and disseminate truth through three modes "narration, description, and argument" (Hill) (or four modes if you're Bain).

  8. Jan 2017
    1. mixed modes,

      "Mixed modes" comes up quite a few times throughout this excerpt, so I went looking for a definition...

      Here's a breakdown of "complex ideas" that might be helpful with some of the terminology used throughout this excerpt (modes, substances, and relations).

      Also, when I got to Book III, 18-20, I kind of wished those were earlier. They give a quick (and maybe useful?) explanation of simple ideas, simple modes, mixed modes, and substances.

    1. See Crack Modes Slide for examples and modes of cracking.

      Shear cracks are NOT faults, the rotate into mode 1 orientation ("Wing cracks")

  9. Jul 2016
    1. les effets de profondeur, d’opacité, d’éclatement, de persistance et de calculabilité qui font tout l’enjeu des modes d’existence numériques
  10. May 2014
    1. Specifically, we explore three key usage modes (see Figure 1): • HPC in the Cloud , in which researchers out - source entire applications to current public and/ or private Cloud platforms; • HPC plus Cloud , focused on exploring scenarios in which clouds can complement HPC/grid re - sources with cloud services to support science and engineering application workflows—for ex - ample, to support heterogeneous requirements or unexpected spikes in demand; and • HPC as a Service , focused on exposing HPC/grid resources using elastic on-demand cloud abstrac - tions, aiming to combine the flexibility of cloud models with the performance of HPC systems

      Three key usage modes for HPC & Cloud:

      • HPC in the Cloud
      • HPC plus Cloud
      • HPC as a Service
  11. Feb 2014
    1. Ho w to R ead a Judicia l Opin ion: A G uid e for N ew L aw Stu den ts Professor Orin S. Kerr George Washington University Law School Washington, DC Version 2.0 (August 2005) This essay is desig ned to help entering law students understand ho w to read cas es for class. It explains what judicial opinions are, how they are structured, and what you should look for when you read them. Part I explains the various ingredients found in a typical judicial opinion, and is the most essential section of the essay . Par t II discusses what you should look for when you re ad an opinion for class. Part II I con clu des with a brief discussion of why law schools use the case method.

      I need a way to add tags to a document that will apply to all annotations in a particular document (except where explicitly canceled).

      The problem is that I often want to query all annotations related to a specific document, collection of documents, or type of activity.

      Type of activity requires further explanation: Given a document or collection of documents I may annotate the document for different reasons at different times.

      For example, while annotating the reading materials, video transcripts, and related documents for the CopyrightX course there are certain types of annotations that may be "bundled together" so that when I search for those things later I can easily narrow my searches to just that subset of annotations; but at the same time I need a way to globally group things together.

      While reading judicial opinions the first activity/mode of interaction with a particular document may be to identify the structure of the judicial opinion (the document attached to this annotation describes the parts of the judicial opinion I might want to identify: *caption, case citation, author, facts of the case, law of the case, disposition, concurring and/or dissenting opinions, etc).

      The above-described mode I may use for multiple documents in one session related to the course syllabus for the week.

      To connect each of these documents together I might add the tags: copyx (my shorthand for the name of the course, CopyrightX), week 1 (how far into the course syllabus), foundations (the subject matter in the syllabus which may span week 1, week 2, etc), judicial opinions (the specific topic I am focused on learning at the moment (may or may not be related to the syllabus).

      Later on another day I might update my existing annotations or add new ones when I am preparing to study for an exam. I might add tags like to study, on midterm, on final to mark areas I need to review.

      After the exam I might add more tags based on my test score, especially focusing on areas that received a poor score so I can study that section more or, if I missed some sections so didn't study and it resulted in a poor score in that area, add tags to study for later if necessary.

      I have many more examples and modes of interaction in mind that I can explain more later, but it all hinges on a rich and flexible tagging system that:

      • allows tagging a document once in a way that applies to all annotations in a document
      • allows tagging a session once in a way that applies to all annotations in all documents connected to a particular session
      • allows tagging a session and/or a document that bundles together new tags added to an annotation (e.g. tags for grammar/spelling, tags for rhetological fallacy classification, etc)
      • fast keyboard-based selection of content
      • batch selection of annotation areas with incremental filling-- I may want to simply select all the parts of a document to annotate first and then increment through each of those placeholders to fill in tags and commentary
      • Mark multiple sections of the document at once to combine into a single annotation
      • Excerpting only parts of a text selection, but still carry the surrounding textual context with the excerpt to easily expose the surrounding context when necessary
      • A summary view of a document that is the result of remixing parts of the original document with both clarifications or self-containing summary re-writes and/or commentary from the reader
      • structural tagging vs content tagging
  12. Sep 2013
    1. [1356a] Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.

      Modes of persuasion: character of speaker, appeal, proof

    1. It is not right to pervert the judge by moving him to anger or envy or pity -- one might as well warp a carpenter's rule before using it.

      In favor of modes of persuasion over emotional appeal, distinguishing proper and improper methods.

    2. The modes of persuasion are the only true constituents of the art: everything else is merely accessory.

      modes vs. accessory