67 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Apr 2019
    1. Almost every social network of note had an early signature proof of work hurdle. For Facebook it was posting some witty text-based status update. For Instagram, it was posting an interesting square photo. For Vine, an entertaining 6-second video. For Twitter, it was writing an amusing bit of text of 140 characters or fewer. Pinterest? Pinning a compelling photo. You can likely derive the proof of work for other networks like Quora and Reddit and Twitch and so on. Successful social networks don't pose trick questions at the start, it’s usually clear what they want from you.

      And this is likely the reason that the longer form blogs never went out of style in areas of higher education where people are still posting long form content. This "proof of work" is something they ultimately end up using in other areas.

      Jessifer example of three part post written for a journal that was later put back into long form for publication.

  3. Oct 2018
    1. he anti-relativists counter that the very notion of a “faultless” disagreement is incompatible with our common understanding of what it means to disagree. It is a hallmark of disagreement, as commonly understood, that the parties involved find fault with the other sides’ views.

      Negative for relativism

    2. If well-informed, honest and intelligent people are unable to resolve conflicts of opinion, we should, some relativists argue, accept that all parties to such disputes could be right and their conflicting positions have equal claims to truth, each according to their own perspective or point of view.

      Good point to use

    3. To take an example, moral relativism, according to this approach, is the claim that the truth or justification of beliefs with moral content is relative to specific moral codes. So the sentence “It is wrong to sell people as slaves” is elliptical for “It is wrong to sell people as slaves relative to the moral code of …”. Or alternatively, as Kusch (2010) formulates the idea on behalf of the relativist: “It is wrong-relative-to-the-moral-code-of-…” to sell people as slaves. The resulting sentence(s) turns out to be true, according to the relativist, depending on how we fill in the “…”. So, “It is wrong to sell people as slaves” comes out true relative to the moral code of the United Nations Charter of Human Rights and false relative to the moral code of ancient Greece.

      This is an excellent way of summarizing moral relativism with a great example.

    4. A second approach to defining relativism casts its net more widely by focusing primarily on what relativists deny. Defined negatively, relativism amounts to the rejection of a number of interconnected philosophical positions. Traditionally, relativism is contrasted with:

      Could use some of these as proofs

  4. Sep 2017
  5. Apr 2017
    1. We would be left floundering in conflicting nonsensical schemes if we accepted all the views that we can't really disprove.

      Booth quotes Russell a lot, so I'll link Russell's teapot here. Basically, maybe there's a teapot orbiting the Earth? But if a believer in that teapot was trying to persuade someone to believe in the teapot, the burden of proof is to prove it, not disprove it.

  6. Feb 2017
    1. It evidently means only that the "burden of proof" lies with the accusers;-that he is not to be called on to prove his innocence, or to be dealt with as a criminal till he has done so; but that they arc to bring their charges against him, which if he can repel, he stands acquiltt!d.

      I quite like this. A man is not "innocent or guilty" during his trial, but is instead just an observer to his accusers and the evidence that is put against him. We shouldn't determine one's innocence or guilt by their argument or appearance alone, but instead look at the total case and find the more logically supported argument. We should use similar presumption in rhetoric, and challenge those presumptions only when our Burden of Proof is too big to ignore.

      It's basically a call to support the more sound arguments.

  7. Jan 2017
    1. flipped classroom model

      This story is a proof for the efficiency of flipped classroom.

    1. DENNIS WEIS Co-author of Mass and Raw Muscle; former champion body builder and powerlifter. “…Serious Growth can’t help but take a bodybuilder into a 4th dimension of fresh new muscle growth.”
    2. EDMUND ENOS, Ph.D. Associate professor of exercise science - Concordia University; leading authority on bodybuilding and strength training “…thanks to serious growth, America has again become a world leader in developing advanced bodybuilding and strength training programs.”
    3. What bodybuilding professionals are saying about serious growth…
    4. Tony Chillino – West Nyack, NY “I was skeptical at first, but I decided to go for it. The results are phenomenal. Serious Growth put 30 pounds of muscle on my frame. My strength jumped in all exercises. About 90 pounds was put on my bench, 70 on the military and back. My body went through changes that my peers couldn’t believe, they accused me of doing drugs, but I plainly said ‘never’. You’ll feel yourself growing and getting stronger during the duration of the Serious Growth training. Your body is brought to a new level of accomplishment. You’ve made my dreams come true, keep it up.”
    5. Jared Jensen – Brigham, UT “I was ready to quit weight training but I decided to give this system a try. On the 3rd week my bench jumped 40 lbs. I was hooked. …I've seen guys in the gym who are using steroids. I get just as good gains as they do without killing myself. I couldn’t imagine working out without this program. Thanks Leo!”
    6. Bill Becker – Mt. Morris, PA “The Bulgarian System is amazing. In just 3 weeks my bench press went from 245 lbs. to 280 lbs. I didn’t think a natural training program could deliver results like this. Thanks OTS.”
    7. David Harper – Stone Mountain, GA “I have never been able to re-create the gains made by the use of anabolics and lifting extremely heavy weights, until now! …In just two months of dedication to this idea my maximum bench went from 260 pounds to 325 pounds which is just 15 pounds from when I was 19 and using anabolics. My body weight has gone from 195 to 225 and I seem to have less of that unwanted spare tire.”
    8. Peter Giaardini – Age 16 New Rochelle, NY “I could literally feel my body growing. I started out a measly 140 lbs. with 14½ inch arms. Now I’m 175 lbs. With 17½ inch arms and growing. My bench press went from 160 lbs. max to 325 lbs. Thanks Leo.”
    9. Mark Zollitsch – Newport Beach, CA “I’m training for the Olympics, and in just two weeks on the Bulgarian System, I added 50 lbs. to my bench. I used to hate doing pullups, now I’m doing five sets of twelve with a 15 lb. dumbbell hanging from my waist. This system is fantastic.”
    10. B. Laswell – Age 40 – Texas “I've been bodybuilding since I was 14. I’ve always been a hardgainer, but after 90 days on the Bulgarian System, I’ve added 140 lbs. to my squad and 20 lbs. of weight without it going to my waist. The Bulgarian System is the best that I have ever used. I only wish I had your course a long time ago; it would have saved me years of slow progress.”
    11. Eric Litster – Brigham City, UT “Thanks to OTS. In the last nine months I’ve added at least 100 pounds to my squat, seventy odd pounds to my bench, and 20 plus pounds to number of other movements. …And it gets better with every trip to the gym.”
    12. Dr. Mark Radermacher – Age 35 Management Consultant – Heartford, WI “I had never seriously lifted weights before in my life, but I wanted a sculptured aesthetic looking physique. Since I started the Bulgarian System I’ve made on believable size and strength gains. I started off struggling with squats at 135 lbs. Now just 3½ months later, I’m using 300 lbs. My chest, legs, and shoulders have gotten so big that I’ve outgrown all my suits.”
    13. Clyde Holland – Florence, AZ “Wow, the Burst program is awesome! It’s the best work out I've ever been exposed to. At the beginning I weighed 195 lbs. Now, I’m 217 lbs. and strong. I’ve been accused of using steroids. 12 weeks has added about 20 lbs. I have never seen anything which looked so wrong but is so right. I have a pile of muscle magazines and books written by Arnold, and others. None compares to this workout.”
    14. Michael Pinheiro – Age 15 High School Student – Hanford, CA Michael came to me weighing only 99 pounds and bench pressing 85 pounds, and he had a sincere desire to get big and strong. I put him on the Bulgarian system, and in the short time he's been using it he's made the most impressive gains of any young guy I've ever seen. Michael now bench presses 205 pounds (up from 85–that's more than double) and front squats 215 pounds (up from one of the 125). He weighs in at 130 pounds (up from 99) and his body fat has increased by only 1.5%. That's an incredible ratio of fat-to-muscle gain.
    15. Eric Poole – Age 33 Sales Manager – Visalia, CA Eric had only been working out sporadically off-and-on for a year. Nothing serious. Then he saw what I and some of my other clients had done with the Bulgarian system and he wanted to be a part of. When he began, he could only bench press 175 pounds for three reps maximum. Four weeks later, he was bench pressing 315 pounds! His squats went from 190 pounds (5 reps max) to 265 pounds.

      Testimonial

    16. Bob Pierce – Age 20 College football player – Tulare, CA Bob started this program weighing 234 pounds (his heaviest weight ever), but he desperately needed to gain more weight for his lineman position on the football team. He had already tried lots of other systems for putting on weight and muscle mass, but nothing seemed to work. What's more, he had been training for over 5 years, which means his body was near its peak–and that's why he was having trouble putting on lean meat. (Or so he thought.) I put him on the Bulgarian system and in only 10 weeks, Bob gained 20 pounds of new muscle, with no increase in body fat! His bench press went from 315 pounds to 415 pounds in only 10 weeks. His legs don't fit into his old blue jeans anymore, and his friends at the gym swear he must be on steroids. (He's not. I don't allow any of my clients to use steroids.)

      Testimonial

    17. I Tested It And It Works! I train really hard. Most athletes couldn't hold a candle to me. At 250 pounds and 5'10", I thought I was pretty darn developed. But when I return from the Eastern Bloc, I immediately put their methods to the test on my own body. And I'm happy (and embarrassed) to say that their training system runs rings around everything else I've tried here in the U.S. After just four months on their program, I pared 15 pounds of fat and replaced it with 20 pounds of rock-hard muscle. My neck size is now 20 inches and my arms are 20 ¾ inches. (And that's a cold measurement. What's more, I've never used a steroid in my life, and I don't allow my clients to either.) And I'm just the first example of how amazingly effective the SERIOUS GROWTH system is.
    18. Literally hundreds of experiments were done over several years to determine what worked best and what didn't. They put their best scientists to work determining how the body builds strength, power, and large muscles.
    19. Men, women, and sports teams throughout California come to me when they need to rapidly improve their strength, performance, endurance, or appearance.
    20. Probably my most famous (though not best built) client is Hollywood film star Kevin Costner. Another client of Hollywood fame is Steve Ruether, Producer of Pretty Woman, Dirty Dancing, and other top motion pictures.
    21. Over 40,000 hard-core bodybuilders already used this system with the most spectacular results I've ever seen. Many of the most respected professional athletes are raving about this training breakthrough
  8. Dec 2016
  9. Nov 2014
    1. mobile device

      is it also worth mentioning that some network graph controls are (currently) unavailable on touch screen devices?

    2. showing

      shows? (otherwise not a sentence)

    3. the project drew on the addressee information from letters that are currently sealed

      Not quite accurate - we don't have letter-by-letter addressee information, but are relying instead on the summary the processing archivists created. There's still a point to be made here... We're relying on the existence of letters rather than thinking about and digging into the content of the correspondence. So the fact that the letters are sealed isn't a blocker to this approach.

    4. difficult simply from archival research

      maybe here we emphasize the strength of automation? what we did would be possible through other means - just really tedious

    1. hypothes.is won't let me annotate the text in the help modal window, so I'll make notes here.

      turn the labels on or off, making it easier which may make it easier ?

      you can hover over wording a bit awkward; user isn't hovering; hover your mouse over? (wonder if there is standard language for this we can borrow?)

      degree/betweenness/centrality - can we bold these instead of putting them in quotes?

    1. The final step of the project was the drafting of the site’s text, including analyses of what was learned from the visualizations.

      do we want to revise this at all? (do we think this is still accurate?)

    2. RDF

      we could say "linked data" or "linked open data" - slightly less technical and jargony than RDF, which is an implementation detail

    3. Emory Finding Aids

      add a link to findingaids.library.emory.edu ? or do we have one elsewhere?

    4. EAD and TEI

      links to the websites for these standards?

    5. take provide

      one of these words is extra

    6. more letters

      this seems like a fine example but we're not actually using the volume or count of letters in our data (because we don't have access to that information)

    7. large

      was this supposed to be larger? otherwise it could probably be removed

    8. each

      not quite accurate - the finding aids describe generally who the the correspondence is to; I'm not sure they have this level of detail on the specific letters for any of the restricted content

    9. dedications of the works

      If you mean poem dedications/titles like "to Derek Mahon", there really aren't very many of those. Perhaps we can generalize a bit more here?

    10. have

      redundant word?

    11. including Pat (SGML), Tamino (XML), and eXist (XML). The encoding has been migrated from TEI version P3 (SGML) to P4 (XML) and currently, P5.

      should any of these technologies (TEI, eXist) be linked?

    12. Many of these drafts were held by Special Collections as typescripts or “Group sheets.

      "held ... as typescripts" seems like odd phrasing. Perhaps: "Many of these typescripts, known as "Group sheets" were/are held ... "?

    13. Special Collections Department

      should we add a comment, now MARBL? e.g. "Special Collections Department (now Manuscript, Archives....)" I see now we have a comment like that later, in the next section...

    14. theManuscript

      missing space?

    15. Seamus Heaney, Philip Hobsbaum, Michael Longley, Paul Muldoon, James Simmons, Ciaran Carson

      I know these names were already linked above, but should we go ahead and link them again?

    16. Michael Allen

      we should make sure to address somewhere why we don't have a profile for Michael Allen and why he doesn't show up in our network graphs

    17. Arthur Terry

      should we have a profile for Terry?

    1. wording - relationships around the group also seems a little odd. among the members of the group?

    2. measuring

      measuring seems weird/inaccurate. diagramming maybe?

  10. Feb 2014
    1. Well, this whole thing was cleared up by the logician Tarski, I guess, and some others, mayb e Russell or Peano. Anyhow, what you do is, you write down the axioms of your theory in a formal language with a given list of symb ols or alphab et. Then you write down the hyp othesis of your theorem in the same symb olism. Then you show that you can transform the hyp othesis step by step, using the rules of logic, till you get the conclusion. That's a pro of. Student : Really? That's amazing! I've taken elementary and ad- vanced calculus, basic algebra, and top ology, and I've never seen that done. I:M: : Oh, of course no one ever really do es it. It would take forever! You just show that you could do it, that's sucient.

      QED == 警策

    2. e can think of no condemnation more damning than to say of a student, \He do esn't even know what a pro of is". Yet he is able to give no coherent explanation of what is meant by rigor, or what is required to make a pro of rigorous.
  11. Oct 2013
    1. when people think that what they have said cannot be refuted, they then think that they are bringing forward a "complete proof," meaning that the matter has now been demonstrated and completed (peperhasmeuou ); for the word perhas has the same meaning (of "end" or "boundary") as the word tekmarh in the ancient tongue.

      I think it is interesting when the author talks about the origins of words and why they mean the things they do.

  12. Sep 2013
    1. [1356a] Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.

      Modes of persuasion: character of speaker, appeal, proof

    1. Then you must prove that the rhetorician is not a fool, and that rhetoric is an art and not a flattery

      The concessions Socrates led Polus to make allowed him to shift the burden of proof.