42 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Perhaps we should detect URLSearchParams objects differently (using duck typing detection instead of instanceof window.URLSearchParams, for example) but the solution isn't adding a specific polyfill to Axios (as it'd increase the bundle size and still won't work with other polyfills).
    1. Sometimes we can’t implement a solution that’s fully spec-compliant, and in those cases using a polyfill might be the wrong answer. A polyfill would translate into telling the rest of the codebase that it’s okay to use the feature, that it’ll work just like in modern browsers, but it might not in edge cases.
  2. Oct 2020
    1. Note that if you are calling reset() and not specify new initial values, you must call it with no arguments. Be careful to avoid things like promise.catch(reset) or onChange={form.reset} in React, as they will get arguments passed to them and reinitialize your form.
  3. Sep 2020
  4. Aug 2020
    1. Will you accept merge requests on the gitlab-ce/gitlab-foss project after it has been renamed? No. Merge requests submitted to this project will be closed automatically.
    1. As a result, I end up quoting multiple people, sometimes quoting several people back-to-back, before even writing my reply. In those instances it feels like I'm not properly citing those individuals. I feel like it might seem I'm not providing new readers appropriate context for a given quote. It might also be implied that separate quotes are from the same person, leading to mis-attribution.
  5. Jun 2020
    1. OK, so what about regular messages? Turns out they are not encrypted after all. Where Signal implements the security and privacy protocols right from the start, Telegram separates the two and offers an additional option. The problem is that not everyone is aware of the Secret Chat option and first-time users may send sensitive information in the regular chat window unknowingly.
  6. May 2020
    1. Unscrupulous providers are incentivized to use inefficient or malicious means to increase break/fix work and thus increase their revenue.
    1. While this is illegal and can result in criminal and civil penalties, your cooperation may make you eligible for up to a US$50,000 reward.

      Might not this motivate someone to conspire with someone else, one to commit the crime and one to collect the reward? Probably mitigated by a contingency that the reward may only be collected if criminal is successfully charged and prosecuted?

  7. Apr 2020
    1. IDEs and standard *nix tools like sed can help, but you typically have to make a trade-off between introducing errors and introducing tedium.
  8. Mar 2020
    1. It won't let me go beyond this page. I'm sure I've answered the CAPTCHA correctly at least some of the 10+ times I've tried. What's going on?

      I can't even access their static website to find contact information for how to contact them about this problem!

    1. illustrates the extent to which illegal practices prevail, with vendors of CMPs turning a blind eye to — or worse, incentivising — clearly illegal configurations of their systems
    2. All of which means — per EU law — it should be equally easy for website visitors to choose not to be tracked as to agree to their personal data being processed.
    3. “Popular CMP implementation wizards still allow their clients to choose implied consent, even when they have already indicated the CMP should check whether the visitor’s IP is within the geographical scope of the EU, which should be mutually exclusive,” they note, arguing that: “This raises significant questions over adherence with the concept of data protection by design in the GDPR.”
    1. b

      protonation state of the compound in panel b is wrong

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    1. Earlier this year it began asking Europeans for consent to processing their selfies for facial recognition purposes — a highly controversial technology that regulatory intervention in the region had previously blocked. Yet now, as a consequence of Facebook’s confidence in crafting manipulative consent flows, it’s essentially figured out a way to circumvent EU citizens’ fundamental rights — by socially engineering Europeans to override their own best interests.
  9. Jan 2020
  10. Dec 2019
    1. Despite the successful resolution, it was still quite unsettling that a domain name could be transferred to another registrant and sinkholed for some perceived violation. I thought there would be more checks in place to confirm that a perceived violation was real before a domain could be transferred.

      This is highly unsettling. A person, organisation, country, or company should not be able to have a domain name transferred from its rightful owner this easily.

    1. It shouldn't be useful to distinguish between requests made by Ajax and other kinds of request. Pretty much any usecase where you'd want to do that is better served by using the Accept header to ask for data in a specific format.
  11. Aug 2019
    1. I don’t like reducers. I’ve tried using them, but I always end up migrating away. Something just feels wrong about dispatching actions to trigger business logic when I could instead do so by invoking a function with arguments.
    1. As Sebastian Markbage pointed out, no abstraction is superior to wrong abstractions. We are providing low-level components to maximize composition capabilities.
    1. Case in point: take this css selector: h1.header > a[rel~="author"] Its shortest functional XPath equivalent would be //h1[contains(" "+normalize-space(@class)+" "," header ")]/a[contains(" "+normalize-space(@rel)+" "," author ")] …which is both much harder to read and write. If you wrote this XPath instead: //h1[@class="header"]/a[@rel="author"] …you would incorrectly have missed markup like <h1 class="article header"><a rel="author external" href="/mike">...</a></h1>
  12. Sep 2018
  13. Jan 2018
  14. Oct 2017
    1. But, how confident our we that our manipulation of the light switch was the only variable changing in our experiment?

      Correction first "our" should be changed to "are".

  15. Apr 2017
  16. Nov 2016
    1. Coral reefs result from the work of little polyps, creatures only a few millimeters long, budded on top of one another. Over centuries, the shells of these creatures combine to form the exotic shapes of coral reefs. Tiny differences in the anatomy of each polyp species affect the shape of their shells and produce the exotic shapes of each reef.

      Skeletons, not shells. Far from the most articulate description but generally not wrong.

  17. Aug 2014
    1. When CO2 dissolves in water, we are NOT adding acid to the water.

      CO2 does increase the acidity when dissolved in water. For reference, see for instance "Once dissolved in seawater, CO2 gas reacts with water to form carbonic acid" in Doney et al (2008) http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev.marine.010908.163834

  18. Oct 2013
    1. The ambitious man does wrong for sake of honour, the quick-tempered from anger, the lover of victory for the sake of victory, the embittered man for the sake of revenge, the stupid man because he has misguided notions of right and wrong, the shameless man because he does not mind what people think of him; and so with the rest -- any wrong that any one does to others corresponds to his particular faults of character.

      Types of people who commit wrong-doings. It is interesting because they all do the same things but for drastically different reasons.

    1. The fact is that anger makes us confident -- that anger is excited by our knowledge that we are not the wrongers but the wronged, and that the divine power is always supposed to be on the side of the wronged.

      It is pretty true. We aren't objective when we are angry.

    1. The worse of two acts of wrong done to others is that which is prompted by the worse disposition. Hence the most trifling acts may be the worst ones;

      But how would anyone know what kind of disposition the doer really possessed? This seems something that only an all-knowing God or gods would know, that is why our justice system works off of the crime committed. You get into difficult judgement calls when you start at the root of why someone did something. Like when people plead mental illness for why they committed a crime. I'm not making a judgement call on whether this is right. I'm only stating that if we start going that route, when do we stop? Do we scan everyone's brain for why they did it and blame it all on mental instability? What about when our technology gets so good that we can see each area of their brain that has been affected by abuse? There most likely is something funky going on in everyone's brain who does something terrible... so should we judge them on their actions or the reasons behind them?