319 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. In this respect, we join Fitzpatrick (2011) in exploring “the extent to which the means of media production and distribution are undergoing a process of radical democratization in the Web 2.0 era, and a desire to test the limits of that democratization”

      Something about this is reminiscent of WordPress' mission to democratize publishing. We can also compare it to Facebook whose (stated) mission is to connect people, while it's actual mission is to make money by seemingly radicalizing people to the extremes of our political spectrum.

      This highlights the fact that while many may look at content moderation on platforms like Facebook as removing their voices or deplatforming them in the case of people like Donald J. Trump or Alex Jones as an anti-democratic move. In fact it is not. Because of Facebooks active move to accelerate extreme ideas by pushing them algorithmically, they are actively be un-democratic. Democratic behavior on Facebook would look like one voice, one account and reach only commensurate with that person's standing in real life. Instead, the algorithmic timeline gives far outsized influence and reach to some of the most extreme voices on the platform. This is patently un-democratic.

    1. Meanwhile, the algorithms that recommend this content still work to maximize engagement. This means every toxic post that escapes the content-moderation filters will continue to be pushed higher up the news feed and promoted to reach a larger audience.

      This and the prior note are also underpinned by the fact that only 10% of people are going to be responsible for the majority of posts, so if you can filter out the velocity that accrues to these people, you can effectively dampen down the crazy.

    2. In his New York Times profile, Schroepfer named these limitations of the company’s content-moderation strategy. “Every time Mr. Schroepfer and his more than 150 engineering specialists create A.I. solutions that flag and squelch noxious material, new and dubious posts that the A.I. systems have never seen before pop up—and are thus not caught,” wrote the Times. “It’s never going to go to zero,” Schroepfer told the publication.

      The one thing many of these types of noxious content WILL have in common are the people at the fringes who are regularly promoting it. Why not latch onto that as a means of filtering?

    3. But anything that reduced engagement, even for reasons such as not exacerbating someone’s depression, led to a lot of hemming and hawing among leadership. With their performance reviews and salaries tied to the successful completion of projects, employees quickly learned to drop those that received pushback and continue working on those dictated from the top down.

      If the company can't help regulate itself using some sort of moral compass, it's imperative that government or other outside regulators should.

    4. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Joan Donovan, PhD</span> in "This is just some of the best back story I’ve ever read. Facebooks web of influence unravels when @_KarenHao pulls the wrong thread. Sike!! (Only the Boston folks will get that.)" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>03/14/2021 12:10:09</time>)</cite></small>

    1. System architects: equivalents to architecture and planning for a world of knowledge and data Both government and business need new skills to do this work well. At present the capabilities described in this paper are divided up. Parts sit within data teams; others in knowledge management, product development, research, policy analysis or strategy teams, or in the various professions dotted around government, from economists to statisticians. In governments, for example, the main emphasis of digital teams in recent years has been very much on service design and delivery, not intelligence. This may be one reason why some aspects of government intelligence appear to have declined in recent years – notably the organisation of memory.57 What we need is a skill set analogous to architects. Good architects learn to think in multiple ways – combining engineering, aesthetics, attention to place and politics. Their work necessitates linking awareness of building materials, planning contexts, psychology and design. Architecture sits alongside urban planning which was also created as an integrative discipline, combining awareness of physical design with finance, strategy and law. So we have two very well-developed integrative skills for the material world. But there is very little comparable for the intangibles of data, knowledge and intelligence. What’s needed now is a profession with skills straddling engineering, data and social science – who are adept at understanding, designing and improving intelligent systems that are transparent and self-aware58. Some should also specialise in processes that engage stakeholders in the task of systems mapping and design, and make the most of collective intelligence. As with architecture and urban planning supply and demand need to evolve in tandem, with governments and other funders seeking to recruit ‘systems architects’ or ‘intelligence architects’ while universities put in place new courses to develop them.
  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. As an opening move, I’d suggest that we could reconceptualize intelligence as NaQ (neuroacoustic quotient), or ‘the capacity to cleanly switch between different complex neuroacoustic profiles.’

      also seems more neutral and embracing the differences in [[neurodiversity]] / individual thinking vs relentless optimizing for a certain KPI (like for IQs) #[[to write]]

  4. Dec 2020
    1. création collective de sens qui est au cœur de l’intelligence humaine

      objectif de l'intelligence collective, des humanités numériques comme discipline en communauté

    2. les chercheurs en sciences humaines doivent donner l’exemple – dans leur pratique ! – d’une production de sens qui s’offre à la connaissance de la manière la plus transparente possible

      Injonction aux faiseurs de connaissance – autre morceau du programme de l’intelligence collective de Pierre Lévy?

      versant éthique?

  5. Nov 2020
  6. Oct 2020
    1. Australia's Cyber Security Strategy: $1.66 billion dollar cyber security package = AFP gets $88 million; $66 million to critical infrastructure organisations to assess their networks for vulnerabilities; ASD $1.35 billion (over a decade) to recruit 500 officers.

      Reasons Dutton gives for package:

      • child exploitation
      • criminals scamming, ransomware
      • foreign governments taking health data and potential attacks to critical infrastructure

      What is defined as critical infrastructure is expanded and subject to obligations to improve their defences.

      Supporting cyber resilience of SMEs through information, training, and services to make them more secure.

    1. Similarly, technology can help us control the climate, make AI safe, and improve privacy.

      regulation needs to surround the technology that will help with these things

    1. What if you could use AI to control the content in your feed? Dialing up or down whatever is most useful to you. If I’m on a budget, maybe I don’t want to see photos of friends on extravagant vacations. Or, if I’m trying to pay more attention to my health, encourage me with lots of salads and exercise photos. If I recently broke up with somebody, happy couple photos probably aren’t going to help in the healing process. Why can’t I have control over it all, without having to unfollow anyone. Or, opening endless accounts to separate feeds by topic. And if I want to risk seeing everything, or spend a week replacing my usual feed with images from a different culture, country, or belief system, couldn’t I do that, too? 

      Some great blue sky ideas here.

    1. Walter Pitts was pivotal in establishing the revolutionary notion of the brain as a computer, which was seminal in the development of computer design, cybernetics, artificial intelligence, and theoretical neuroscience. He was also a participant in a large number of key advances in 20th-century science.
  7. Sep 2020
    1. doivent consulter des oracles

      Par exemple, pour entraîner une intelligence artificielle, le philosophe montréalais Martin Gibert propose de montrer aux IA des exemples, des modèles à suivre (des Greta et des Mère Theresa) plutôt que d’essayer de leur enseigner les concepts de la philosophie morale.

  8. Aug 2020
    1. Advantages of people in [[Silicon Valley]]:** super smart but not necessarily highly educated so they don’t just believe what everyone else does. **They think outside the box. They’re thinkers as well as people that have had to do things and pass [[reality]] tests. The only test most academics face is "can I publish this piece?"

      What differs people in Silicon Valley and typical students

  9. Jul 2020
  10. Jun 2020
    1. But tagging, alone, is still not good enough. Even our many tags become useless if/when their meaning changes (in our minds) by the time we go retrieve the data they point to. This could be years after we tagged something. Somehow, whether manually or automatically, we need agents and tools to help us keep our tags updated and relevant.

      search engines usually can surface that faster (less cognitive load than recalling what and where you store something) than you retrieve it in your second brain (abundance info, do can always retrieve from external source in a JIT fashion)

    1. each of them flows through each of the two layers of the encoder

      each of them flows through each of the two layers of EACH encoder, right?

    1. It made it challenging for the models to deal with long sentences.

      This is similar to autoencoders struggling with producing high-resolution imagery because of the compression that happens in the latent space, right?

    1. it seems that word-level models work better than character-level models

      Interesting, if you think about it, both when we as humans read and write, we think in terms of words or even phrases, rather than characters. Unless we're unsure how to spell something, the characters are a secondary thought. I wonder if this is at all related to the fact that word-level models seem to work better than character-level models.

    2. As you can see above, sometimes the model tries to generate latex diagrams, but clearly it hasn’t really figured them out.

      I don't think anyone has figured latex diagrams (tikz) out :')

    3. Antichrist

      uhhh should we be worried

    1. We only forget when we’re going to input something in its place. We only input new values to the state when we forget something older.

      seems like a decision aiming for efficiency

    2. outputs a number between 000 and 111 for each number in the cell state Ct−1Ct−1C_{t-1}

      remember, each line represents a vector.

    1. Just as journalists should be able to write about anything they want, comedians should be able to do the same and tell jokes about anything they please

      where's the line though? every output generates a feedback loop with the hivemind, turning into input to ourselves with our cracking, overwhelmed, filters

      it's unrealistic to wish everyone to see jokes are jokes, to rely on journalists to generate unbiased facts, and politicians as self serving leeches, err that's my bias speaking

  11. May 2020
    1. Mei, X., Lee, H.-C., Diao, K., Huang, M., Lin, B., Liu, C., Xie, Z., Ma, Y., Robson, P. M., Chung, M., Bernheim, A., Mani, V., Calcagno, C., Li, K., Li, S., Shan, H., Lv, J., Zhao, T., Xia, J., … Yang, Y. (2020). Artificial intelligence for rapid identification of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). MedRxiv, 2020.04.12.20062661. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.04.12.20062661

    1. Shweta, F., Murugadoss, K., Awasthi, S., Venkatakrishnan, A., Puranik, A., Kang, M., Pickering, B. W., O’Horo, J. C., Bauer, P. R., Razonable, R. R., Vergidis, P., Temesgen, Z., Rizza, S., Mahmood, M., Wilson, W. R., Challener, D., Anand, P., Liebers, M., Doctor, Z., … Badley, A. D. (2020). Augmented Curation of Unstructured Clinical Notes from a Massive EHR System Reveals Specific Phenotypic Signature of Impending COVID-19 Diagnosis [Preprint]. Infectious Diseases (except HIV/AIDS). https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.04.19.20067660

  12. Apr 2020
    1. Abdulla, A., Wang, B., Qian, F., Kee, T., Blasiak, A., Ong, Y. H., Hooi, L., Parekh, F., Soriano, R., Olinger, G. G., Keppo, J., Hardesty, C. L., Chow, E. K., Ho, D., & Ding, X. (n.d.). Project IDentif.AI: Harnessing Artificial Intelligence to Rapidly Optimize Combination Therapy Development for Infectious Disease Intervention. Advanced Therapeutics, n/a(n/a), 2000034. https://doi.org/10.1002/adtp.202000034

    1. The world’s largest exhibitions organizer, London-based Informa plc, outlined on Thursday morning a series of emergency actions it’s taking to alleviate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on its events business, which drives nearly two-thirds of the company’s overall revenues. Noting that the effects have been “significantly deeper, more volatile and wide-reaching,” than was initially anticipated, the company says it’s temporarily suspending dividends, cutting executive pay and issuing new shares worth about 20% of its total existing capital in an effort to strengthen its balance sheet and reduce its approximately £2.4 billion ($2.9 billion) in debt to £1.4 billion ($1.7 billion). Further, Informa says it’s engaged in “constructive discussions” with its U.S.-based debt holders over a covenant waiver agreement.

      Informa Group, que posee editoriales como Taylor & Francis, de Informa Intelligent Division toma medidas en su sector de conferencias y eventos. Provee dos tercios de sus ingresos totales, 2.9 billion dólares. Emite acciones y para el mercado norteamericano acuerdos de deuda. Mientras la parte editorial que aporta un 35% de los ingresos se mantiene sin cambios y con pronósticos estables y sólidos. Stephen Carter CEO

    1. Le public acquiert ainsi une nouvelle fonction : celle d’instance critique auquel doit s’exposer le pouvoir.

      fonction de l’espace public: un appareil critique (la critique est productrice d’espace public).

      le pouvoir, pour maintenir sa légitimité, doit être exposé à la sphère publique et se montrer à lui avec transparence; il doit pouvoir être challengé; s’il ne résiste pas à la critique publique, il ne mérite pas d’être en place.

      la possibilité de challenger l’instance publique est comparable à la publication des protocoles de sécurité utilisées dans le domaine public (ex. SSL/TLS): la sécurité des contenus encryptés tirent justement leur robustesse du fait que leur algorithme est public; quiconque pourrait le challenger à tout moment, si bien qu’on s’assure d’en éliminer toutes les failles (et l’intelligence collective peut être mise à contribution, le cas échéant).

    1. Des applications de visites guidées intelligentes s’appuient sur un processus de gestion des flux visiteurs (Visitor Flow Management Process, VFMP) pour les orienter vers les zones où ils sont le moins nombreux. Il s’agira alors de combiner les données sur l’affluence en temps réel pour chaque espace avec les souhaits et les goûts des visiteurs pour suggérer le parcours personnalisé idéal

      Argument en faveur de l'IA qui permet bien de gérer le flux mais ajoute un second bénéfice : proposer un parcours idéal. Ce bénéfice supplémentaire peut être considéré comme un argument réthorique de type Logos.

    2. Certaines technologies intelligentes utilisées dans d’autres secteurs pourraient être transposées dans les musées. Avec le big data, il est possible de connaître l’affluence en fonction des dates et des horaires, les types de visiteurs selon les jours et les périodes, ou la durée de visite moyenne par rapport différents paramètres comme la météo.

      Argument épistémique inductif et réthorique de type logos.

      On passe à l'intelligence artificielle, technologie de pointe. Apporte du crédit à l'affirmation du bénéfice du numérique.

  13. Feb 2020
    1. visual are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text and visual aids in the classroom improve learning up to 400 percent. Ideas presented graphically are easier to understand and remember than those presented as words, (Kliegel et al., 1987).

      throw out this factoid when doing video?

  14. Dec 2019
    1. Ranking the intelligence of animals seems an increasingly pointless exercise when one considers the really important thing: how well that animal is adapted to its niche
    1. “NextNow Collaboratory is an interesting example of a new kind of collective intelligence: an Internet-enabled, portable social network, easily transferable from one social cause to another.”

      Sense Collective's TotemSDK brings together tools, protocols, platform integrations and best practices for extending collective intelligence beyond our current capabilities. A number of cryptographic primitives have emerged which support the amazing work of projects like the NextNow Collaboratory in exciting ways that help to upgrade the general purpose social computing substrate which make tools like hypothes.is so valuable.

    1. A natural language provides its user with a ready-made structure of concepts that establishes a basic mental structure, and that allows relatively flexible, general-purpose concept structuring. Our concept of language as one of the basic means for augmenting the human intellect embraces all of the concept structuring which the human may make use of.
    2. It has been jokingly suggested several times during the course of this study that what we are seeking is an "intelligence amplifier." (The term is attributed originally to W. Ross Ashby[2,3]. At first this term was rejected on the grounds that in our view one's only hope was to make a better match between existing human intelligence and the problems to be tackled, rather than in making man more intelligent. But deriving the concepts brought out in the preceding section has shown us that indeed this term does seem applicable to our objective. 2c2a Accepting the term "intelligence amplification" does not imply any attempt to increase native human intelligence. The term "intelligence amplification" seems applicable to our goal of augmenting the human intellect in that the entity to be produced will exhibit more of what can be called intelligence than an unaided human could; we will have amplified the intelligence of the human by organizing his intellectual capabilities into higher levels of synergistic structuring. What possesses the amplified intelligence is the resulting H-LAM/T system, in which the LAM/T augmentation means represent the amplifier of the human's intelligence.2c2b In amplifying our intelligence, we are applying the principle of synergistic structuring that was followed by natural evolution in developing the basic human capabilities. What we have done in the development of our augmentation means is to construct a superstructure that is a synthetic extension of the natural structure upon which it is built. In a very real sense, as represented by the steady evolution of our augmentation means, the development of "artificial intelligence" has been going on for centuries.
    1. This is not a new idea. It is based on the vision expounded by Vannevar Bush in his 1945 essay “As We May Think,” which conjured up a “memex” machine that would remember and connect information for us mere mortals. The concept was refined in the early 1960s by the Internet pioneer J. C. R. Licklider, who wrote a paper titled “Man-Computer Symbiosis,” and the computer designer Douglas Engelbart, who wrote “Augmenting Human Intellect.” They often found themselves in opposition to their colleagues, like Marvin Minsky and John McCarthy, who stressed the goal of pursuing artificial intelligence machines that left humans out of the loop.

      Seymour Papert, had an approach that provides a nice synthesis between these two camps, buy leveraging early childhood development to provide insights on the creation of AI.

    2. Thompson’s point is that “artificial intelligence” — defined as machines that can think on their own just like or better than humans — is not yet (and may never be) as powerful as “intelligence amplification,” the symbiotic smarts that occur when human cognition is augmented by a close interaction with computers.

      Intelligence amplification over artificial intelligence. In reality you can't get to AI until you've mastered IA.

    1. lants speak in a chemical vocabulary we can’t directly perceive or comprehend. The first important discoveries in plant communication were made in the lab in the nineteen-eighties, by isolating plants and their chemical emissions in Plexiglas chambers, but Rick Karban, the U.C. Davis ecologist, and others have set themselves the messier task of studying how plants exchange chemical signals outdoors, in a natural setting.
    1. Alexander Samuel reflects on tagging and its origins as a backbone to the social web. Along with RSS, tags allowed users to connect and collate content using such tools as feed readers. This all changed with the advent of social media and the algorithmically curated news feed.

      Tags were used for discovery of specific types of content. Who needs that now that our new overlords of artificial intelligence and algorithmic feeds can tell us what we want to see?!

      Of course we still need tags!!! How are you going to know serendipitously that you need more poetry in your life until you run into the tag on a service like IndieWeb.xyz? An algorithmic feed is unlikely to notice--or at least in my decade of living with them I've yet to run into poetry in one.

  15. Nov 2019
    1. A multimedia approach to affective learning and training can result in more life-like trainings which replicate scenarios and thus provide more targeted feedback, interventions, and experience to improve decision making and outcomes. Rating: 7/10

    1. An emotional intelligence course initiated by Google became a tool to improve mindfulness, productivity, and emotional IQ. The course has since expanded into other businesses which report that employees are coping better with stressors and challenges. Rating: 7/10 Key questions...what is the format of the course, tools etc?

  16. Sep 2019
    1. The idea of a “plant intelligence”—an intelligence that goes beyond adaptation and reaction and into the realm of active memory and decision-making—has been in the air since at least the early seventies.

      what is intelligence after all?

    2. “Trees do not have will or intention. They solve problems, but it’s all under hormonal control, and it all evolved through natural selection.”

      is having will or intention akin to having intelligence?

  17. Aug 2019
    1. so there won’t be a blinking bunny, at least not yet, let’s train our bunny to blink on command by mixing stimuli ( the tone and the air puff)

      Is it just that how we all learn and evolve? 😲

    1. HTM and SDR's - part of how the brain implements intelligence.

      "In this first introductory episode of HTM School, Matt Taylor, Numenta's Open Source Flag-Bearer, walks you through the high-level theory of Hierarchical Temporal Memory in less than 15 minutes."

    1. A notable by-product of a move of clinical as well as research data to the cloud would be the erosion of market power of EMR providers.

      But we have to be careful not to inadvertently favour the big tech companies in trying to stop favouring the big EMR providers.

    2. cloud computing is provided by a small number of large technology companies who have both significant market power and strong commercial interests outside of healthcare for which healthcare data might potentially be beneficial

      AI is controlled by these external forces. In what direction will this lead it?

    3. it has long been argued that patients themselves should be the owners and guardians of their health data and subsequently consent to their data being used to develop AI solutions.

      Mere consent isn't enough. We consent to give away all sorts of data for phone apps that we don't even really consider. We need much stronger awareness, or better defaults so that people aren't sharing things without proper consideration.

    4. To realize this vision and to realize the potential of AI across health systems, more fundamental issues have to be addressed: who owns health data, who is responsible for it, and who can use it? Cloud computing alone will not answer these questions—public discourse and policy intervention will be needed.

      This is part of the habit and culture of data use. And it's very different in health than in other sectors, given the sensitivity of the data, among other things.

    5. In spite of the widely touted benefits of “data liberation”,15 a sufficiently compelling use case has not been presented to overcome the vested interests maintaining the status quo and justify the significant upfront investment necessary to build data infrastructure.

      Advancing AI requires more than just AI stuff. It requires infrastructure and changes in human habit and culture.

    6. However, clinician satisfaction with EMRs remains low, resulting in variable completeness and quality of data entry, and interoperability between different providers remains elusive.11

      Another issue with complex systems: the data can be volumous but poor individual quality, relying on domain knowledge to be able to properly interpret (eg. that doctor didn't really prescribe 10x the recommended dose. It was probably an error.).

    7. Second, most healthcare organizations lack the data infrastructure required to collect the data needed to optimally train algorithms to (a) “fit” the local population and/or the local practice patterns, a requirement prior to deployment that is rarely highlighted by current AI publications, and (b) interrogate them for bias to guarantee that the algorithms perform consistently across patient cohorts, especially those who may not have been adequately represented in the training cohort.9

      AI depends on:

      • static processes - if the population you are predicting changes relative to the one used to train the model, all bets are off. It remains to be seen how similar they need to be given the brittleness of AI algorithms.
      • homogeneous population - beyond race, what else is important? If we don't have a good theory of health, we don't know.
    8. Simply adding AI applications to a fragmented system will not create sustainable change.
    1. Both artists, through annotation, have produced new forms of public dialogue in response to other people (like Harvey Weinstein), texts (The New York Times), and ideas (sexual assault and racial bias) that are of broad social and political consequence.

      What about examples of future sorts of annotations/redactions like these with emerging technologies? Stories about deepfakes (like Obama calling Trump a "dipshit" or the Youtube Channel Bad Lip Reading redubbing the words of Senator Ted Cruz) are becoming more prevalent and these are versions of this sort of redaction taken to greater lengths. At present, these examples are obviously fake and facetious, but in short order they will be indistinguishable and more commonplace.

  18. Jul 2019
  19. Jun 2019
    1. The term first appeared in 1984 as the topic of a public debate at the annual meeting of AAAI (then called the "American Association of Artificial Intelligence"). It is a chain reaction that begins with pessimism in the AI community, followed by pessimism in the press, followed by a severe cutback in funding, followed by the end of serious research.[2] At the meeting, Roger Schank and Marvin Minsky—two leading AI researchers who had survived the "winter" of the 1970s—warned the business community that enthusiasm for AI had spiraled out of control in the 1980s and that disappointment would certainly follow. Three years later, the billion-dollar AI industry began to collapse.
  20. May 2019
  21. engl201.opened.ca engl201.opened.ca