11 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. golden rule: If someone calls saying they’re from your bank, just hang up and call them back — ideally using a phone number that came from the bank’s Web site or from the back of your payment card.

      Golden rule of talking to your bank

    2. “When the representative finally answered my call, I asked them to confirm that I was on the phone with them on the other line in the call they initiated toward me, and so the rep somehow checked and saw that there was another active call with Mitch,” he said. “But as it turned out, that other call was the attackers also talking to my bank pretending to be me.”

      Phishing situation scenario:

      • a person is called by attackers who identify as his bank
      • the victim tell them to hold the line
      • in the meantime, the victim calls his bank representative who confirms after a while that he is with them on another line
      • in reality, the another line is done by attackers pretending to be him
  2. Apr 2020
    1. Basically, the attackers don't actually have video of you or access to your contacts, and they haven't been able to install malicious code on your computer. In reality, they're taking a password from a database that's available online, sending it to you, and hoping you're scared enough to believe their story and send them bitcoin.
  3. Jun 2019
  4. Apr 2019
    1. Facebook users are being interrupted by an interstitial demanding they provide the password for the email account they gave to Facebook when signing up. “To continue using Facebook, you’ll need to confirm your email,” the message demands. “Since you signed up with [email address], you can do that automatically …”A form below the message asked for the users’ “email password.”

      So, Facebook tries to get users to give them their private and non-Facebook e-mail-account password.

      This practice is called spear phishing.

  5. Mar 2019
    1. Office Depot, Inc. and a California-based tech support software provider have agreed to pay a total of $35 million to settle Federal Trade Commission allegations that the companies tricked customers into buying millions of dollars’ worth of computer repair and technical services by deceptively claiming their software had found malware symptoms on the customers’ computers.Office Depot has agreed to pay $25 million while its software supplier, Support.com, Inc., has agreed to pay $10 million as part of their settlements with the FTC. The FTC intends to use these funds to provide refunds to consumers.

      Lovely fraud scheme. Good thing that Office Depot and support.com are paying for this.

    1. Many customers who took their computers in for a free “PC Health Check” at Office Depot or OfficeMax stores between 2009 and November 2016 were told their computers had malware symptoms or infections — but that wasn’t true. The FTC says Office Depot and OfficeMax ran PC Health Check, a diagnostic scan program created and licensed by Support.com, that tricked those consumers into thinking their computers had symptoms of malware or actual “infections,” even though the scan hadn’t found any such issues. Many consumers who got false scan results bought computer diagnostic and repair services from Office Depot and OfficeMax that cost up to $300.

      Office Depot scammed people all over the USA, tricking them into believing something was wrong with their computers.

  6. Jun 2017
  7. Jan 2017
    1. The “can you hear me” con is actually a variation on earlier scams aimed at getting the victim to say the word “yes” in a phone conversation. That affirmative response is recorded by the fraudster and used to authorize unwanted charges on a phone or utility bill or on a purloined credit card.
  8. Aug 2016
    1. Home About Profit Plan Referral Plan FAQ Contact us

      This site is a scam. After a certain period of time the website stop working and they refuse to respond to emails about the issue. Therefore whatever money you "invested" in it is just gone