25 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Dec 2018
    1. Newport is an academic — he makes his primary living teaching computer science at a university, so he already has a built-in network and a self-contained world with clear moves towards achievement.

      This is one of the key reasons people look to social media--for the connections and the network they don't have via non-digital means. Most of the people I've seen with large blogs or well-traveled websites have simply done a much better job of connecting and interacting with their audience and personal networks. To a great extent this is because they've built up a large email list to send people content directly. Those people then read their material and comment on their blogs.

      This is something the IndieWeb can help people work toward in a better fashion, particularly with better independent functioning feed readers.

  3. Nov 2018
  4. Jul 2017
  5. Mar 2017
    1. With the dissemination of large textual data- bases via media such as disks, authors and editors lose control over their work: users can generate subsets, modify them according to their own sense of what constitutes improvements, and even change them so as to avoid charges of plagiarism and copyright infringement.

      Interesting how this sense of loss of control always comes back. I think nowadays we wouldn't say this. Cf. Shapiro et al 1985.

    2. In effect, their exchange of corre- spondence (e-mail) publicly on lists over global networks constitutes participation in a new form of publication. This dimension is central; such network communications systems as Bitnet and the Internet offer new modes of publication, often but not always with counterparts in print media.

      How email represents a new form of publication

    1. p. 21

      One of the most surprising things about electronic mail is the ease with which misinterpretations arise. People are used to reading "body language," voice intonation, and numerous other cues when interpreting messages deleviered in conversation, or even on the telephone. Those cues are missing in electronic mail, and what was meant as a casual comment, or an attempt at humour or irony, is misinterpreted.

    2. pp. 15-16

      Interesting discussion of typographic contextualisation cues between quick informal email and more deliberate one. Recommends that the READER take a different approach to each.

      Why do we care about the level of formality of a message? Simply because the content of the second message should be given more attention and care when received than the first. Words were chosen in the second, and therefore could be expected to be chosen carefully to convey the meaning intended. In the first, informal, message, the words might well have been dashed off, and should be taken quite lightly. You should not try to read deep meaning into a hasty note. (In our other written correspondence, we have other clues: scribbled notes on the back of an envelope are treated more informally than typed letters. However, on your terminal, all electronic messages in one sense look the same, so greater attention must be paid to what clues there are to their level of informality.) [Emphasis added].

    3. p 14. Discusses "the tradition of flaming" on ARPAnet.

    4. p. 13 Already aware of the issue of proliferation

      Electronic mailboxes fill up with peripheral material that needs to be scanned and continuously culled. If one of your recipients decides that somebody else needs to see a message, it can be forwarded at that time.

      Consider an extreme but possible case: A message contains a distribution list of 20 people. Let's say the message asks for comments on a position paper. Each of the recipients responds, copying all the original recipints... Each of those answers is in turn comments on by each original recipient, copying all original recipients. This process generates 421 messages in every person's inbox, with the total system containing 16,421 messages. If each message takes an average of 100 characters, this process has used up 1.6 megabytes of disk storage.This is, in addition, of course, to the social cost of all the human time and effort that has gone into this electronic correspondence.

    5. p. 14 Recommendation for people to summarise replies on "special insterest group"

      A related phenomenon is the "special interest group," a named group of recipients having a common interest, and exchanging messages on that topic, accross computers and across the country. Within these groups, a common means of reducing message prliferation is for a message author to ask, in the message itself, that replies be forwarded directly to him or her; the original author will summarize in a later message the replies received for the benefit of the group. This is a good idea that should become a common protocol, invoked by a commonly understood keyword or phrase in a message.

    6. p. 11 recognise the emotional aspect even then

      Within these categories, we highlight the issues related to the emotional impact of electronic messages, since the immediacy of the medium, and yet the remoteness of the participants, leads to some unique problems in this regard.

    7. p. 11. How it is different from other things

      We have tried to indicate that electronic mail is different. Part of what we mean by that is that the old telephone or letter-writing rules of behavior do not automatically transfer over to this medium and work. You don't write business letters as electronic messages; messages are usually more informal. And yet electronic messages are not printed telephone conversations either. What we find is that the medium is different enough, and the average user's experience has been short enough, that problems arise. Meanings are misunderstood. Tempers flare and cause ill-conceived responses to be written. Many recipients' time is wasted reading content-free or irrelevant messages.

      What we need is a new set of rules: how to be a constructive, courteous sender and receiver or electronic messages. We certainly do not have this set of rules, all tied up in a tidy package. We do, however, feel it is important to hasten the cultural evolution toward this goal. What follows, then, is a discussion of some of the important guidelines we've observed from experience.

    1. One 1997 study found that scholars who self-select as participants inscholarly discussion groups can spend over 40% of their office hours working on the Internet,and the most popular professional uses of the Internet revolve around sending and receivingelectronic mail, both personal and list-mediated

      The origins of the Email plague!

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  6. Feb 2017
  7. Nov 2016
  8. Jul 2016
    1. Several news stories have likened Clinton’s actions to those of retired Gen. David Petraeus, but the situations are very different. Petraeus showed a notebook containing highly classified information—names of agents, code words, and ongoing tactical operations in the U.S. war in Afghanistan—to Paula Broadwell, who was writing a book about him.

      Is "highly classified" a technical term? Since I think there are only three levels of classified info: "top secret", "secret", and "confidential" (corroborated by Classified information in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), Fred Kaplan (the author) must mean that the "highly classified" information disclosed by Petraeus is really sensitive stuff (regardless of how it was slotted officially classified).

  9. www.politifact.com www.politifact.com
    1. Many politicians use private addresses, but private servers like the one Clinton used are rarely seen, said John Wonderlich, a policy director at the Sunlight Foundation, a nonpartisan group focused on government transparency, for a prior PolitiFact story.

      .

  10. Jun 2016
    1. What to do when your coauthor doesn’t return your calls.

      Stemwedel, Janet D. 2016. “What to Do When Your Coauthor Doesn’t Return Your Calls.” Adventures in Ethics and Science. Accessed June 16. http://scienceblogs.com/ethicsandscience/2010/02/14/what-to-do-when-your-coauthor/.

      Discusses what to do when your collaborators don't sign off on a paper and can't be contacted.

  11. Apr 2016
    1. while e-mail dissolves barriers to the exchange of data, we need another solvent to dissolve the barriers to collaborative use of that data. Applied in the right ways, that solvent creates what I like to call the “universal canvas” – an environment in which data and applications flow freely on the Web.

      Highlight of original quote: https://hypothes.is/a/iKeap_T6TauWGfyf19VW_Q

  12. Dec 2015
    1. How to Make Your Startup Introduction Email Simple, Clear and Awesome

      Startup Introduction Email help

  13. Feb 2015
    1. email pops up a new email with the subject set

      Pretty simple with `mailto:{email}?subject="Annotate this"&body="http://..."

      Not all mail clients support body (iirc), but most/all support subject.

    1. But emails are widely understood AKA: "Vanity domains are a very small minority of nerds. Email addresses have the widest common understanding by the average internet user." Decades ago email addresses were a very small minority of nerds, fax machines had a wider common understanding. Email addresses are a more well established technology, just like fax numbers used to be before that, and home landline phone numbers before that. Each was subsequently eclipsed. Email is simply the current such transitional legacy technology.

      You cannot imagine how much I regularly suffer due to being part of this "very small minority of nerds". Unfortunately the will not to learn about these different ways is very strong.

    1. while e-mail dissolves barriers to the exchange of data, we need another solvent to dissolve the barriers to collaborative use of that data. Applied in the right ways, that solvent creates what I like to call the “universal canvas” -- an environment in which data and applications flow freely on the Web.
    2. Implementing a common collaboration system would require effort. Exploiting the e-mail common denominator requires none.