39 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
  2. Oct 2018
    1. I've been more or less a nomad since 2008, and was one of the very first to really travel in a minimalist (one small backpack) way. I'm sure others came before me (and my friend Todd), but none I'm aware of who were writing about it.

      first nomad, yeah!

  3. Sep 2018
    1. Webmention is a simple way to notify any URL when you mention it on your site. From the receiver's perspective, it's a way to request notifications when other sites mention it.
    1. <link rel="pingback" href="https://webmention.io/username/xmlrpc" /> <link rel="webmention" href="https://webmention.io/username/webmention" />
  4. Aug 2018
    1. Google Sheets Blogging CMS
    2. We’ve played with this concept of front-end blogging for a while now. Alan Levine has built an open sourced tool called TRU Writer that even provides this type of front end interface on a WordPress site.
  5. Jul 2018
    1. There are still some wrinkles to be ironed out in getting the various platforms we use today to play well with Webmentions, but it’s a real step toward the goal of that decentralized, distributed, interconnected future for scholarly communication.

      The fun, secret part is that Kathleen hasn't (yet?) discovered IndieAuth so that she can authenticate/authorize micropub clients like Quill to publish content to her own site from various clients by means of a potential micropub endpoint.

      I'll suspect she'll be even more impressed when she realizes that there's a forthcoming wave of feed readers [1] [2] that will allow her to read others' content in a reader which has an integrated micropub client in it so that she can reply to posts directly in her feed reader, then the responses get posted directly to her own website which then, in turn, send webmentions to the site's she's responding to so that the conversational loop can be completely closed.

      She and Lee will also be glad to know that work has already started on private posts and conversations and posting to limited audiences as well. Eventually there will be no functionality that a social web site/silo can do that a distributed set of independent sites can't. There's certainly work to be done to round off the edges, but we're getting closer and closer every day.

      I know how it all works, but even I'm impressed at the apparent magic that allows round-trip conversations between her website and Twitter and Micro.blog. And she hasn't really delved into website to website conversations yet. I suppose we'll have to help IndieWebify some of her colleague's web presences to make that portion easier. Suddenly "academic Twitter" will be the "academic blogosphere" she misses from not too many years ago. :)

      If there are academics out thee who are interested in what Kathleen has done, but may need a little technical help, I'm happy to set up some tools for them to get them started.

    1. In fact blog posts are not the kind of thing one can detail on one’s annual review form, and even a blog in the aggregate doesn’t have a place in which it’s easy to be claimed as a site of ongoing scholarly productivity.
    1. I’ve written up a bunch of details on how and what I did (as well as why), so hopefully it’ll give you a solid start including some custom code snippets and reasonably explicit directions to make some small improvements for those that may be a bit code-averse. Hint: I changed it from being a sidebar widget to making it a full page. Let us know if you need help making some of the small code related changes to get yourself sorted.

      I have been wondering about your following page / blogroll lately. I looked into Colin Walker's plugin, but really did not want to rewrite all my links.

      I have also been looking into archive page templates and assume that just as an archive can be incorporated into a widget or within a template, you have done the same thing with your 'blogroll', therefore when you add somebody new (seemingly weekly, if not daily) then your page automatically updates?

    1. I also value reading a person’s blog over time to understand better their voice and context. So I’m asking for some advice on how to update my module on finding research. What replaces RSS feeds? What works for you that goes beyond “someone on Twitter/Facebook shared….” to something that is more focused and intentional?
    1. Getting started is pretty easy. It’s like joining a gym. Easy to start, easy to go a time or two. It’s the long run that interests me.

      Maybe the idea of a 'long run' is a better way of appreciating big B blogging?

  6. Jun 2018
    1. teachers hid their Facebook accounts for fear of being fired.

      The sound of this to me know reminds me of the type of suppression of thought that might have occurred in the middle ages.

      Of course open thought and discussion is important for teachers the same way it is for every other person. However there are a few potential counterexamples where open discussion of truly abhorrent ideas can run afoul of community mores.

      Case in point:


      [also on boffosocko.com]

    2. This should be a space where you can create the identity that you want to have. You can write yourself into existence.

      I like this sentiment. Had René Descartes been born a bit later might he have said "Blogeō, ergo sum"?


      [also on boffosocko.com]

    1. [MN Thanks, Frank! You have a knack for being ahead of the curve :-)]

      I like the way that MN does inline annotations within his comments section. I don't often see this, but it's relatively well done, and certainly manually at that.

  7. May 2018
    1. Blogging begets blogging. I blog because I'm in the business of locating and connecting interesting things. Operating a popular blog gives people an incentive to approach me with interesting things of their own devising or discovery, for inclusion on Boing Boing. The more I blog, the more of these things I get, as other infovores toss choice morsels over my transom. The feedback loop continues on Boing Boing's message boards, where experts and amateurs debate and discuss the stories I've posted, providing depth and context for free, fixing the most interesting aspects of the most interesting subjects even more prominently in my foremind.
    1. When I think about blogging, there is a cross-over between technology and the way it is used. Big B bloggers are those who take each to their extremes. Content is important. But so is process and product. It is something personal, stemming from our changing circumstances and intent.
    1. Scale in many ways became a distraction, one which was magnified to such a degree by the hype around MOOCs in edtech that anything less that 10s of thousands of “users,” “learners,” “participants,” followers,” etc. was tacitly considered somehow less than optimal for effective online learning

      What about the lurkers?

    2. And for me that is the kicker, most folks treat their blog as if it were some kind of glossy headshot of their thinking, whereas the beauty and freedom of blogging was that it was by design a networked tool. Blogging provides a space to develop an online voice, connect with a particular network, and build a sense of identity online in conjunction with others working through a similar process.
  8. Mar 2018
    1. Earning Dollars From Content Writing Content Writing Takes a Special Set of Skills   A growing number of entrepreneurs hope to make money with Web sites. But these sites need content, which is where freelance content writers come in. Writers who scour the Web will discover a host of sites covering everything from retro martini glasses to high-tech window tinting. These sites all have one thing in common: They constantly need fresh content to boost their rankings among search engines.

      Without this content, these sites won't claim visitors. And without visitors, the owners of these sites won't get any of the ad revenue they crave.

      That's why so many Web site owners are hiring freelance writers today. They need professionals to fill their Web sites with content.

      This is an opportunity for freelance essay writers. But it's also an area of writing that writers should approach cautiously: Content writers who aren't careful may end up spending long hours writing tedious stories for little money.

      The Content Writing Business Content-writing jobs aren't always the most fulfilling. Writers may be called upon to write a package of five 350-word stories on food compressors or juicers. They may be hired to write 10 articles on golf laser rangefinders.

      The good news for writers is that they can complete these assignments without having to conduct interviews or do much research. The bad news is that the people hiring content writers often want to pay them notoriously low wages.

      Freelance writers who visit job-bidding sites may be surprised to find Web site owners hoping to pay writers $1 for every 400-word story they can churn out. This kind of work can quickly wear writers out.

      Good Content Writing Jobs are Available This doesn't mean that writers can't earn solid extra money by writing content stories. In fact, there are plenty of good content-writing opportunities to be found. Writers just have to exercise the same caution they'd show when applying for any type of freelance-writing job.

      The key to making decent money as a content writer is for freelancers to only accept assignments on topics about which they already know. This allows writers to hash out a story quickly. In content writing, the more writers can write, and the faster in which they can do it, the more dollars they'll earn.

      It's also important to set a baseline. Writers should determine the lowest possible per-word amount for which they are willing to write. They should then refrain from taking on assignments that fall below that threshold.

      To find content-writing jobs, writers can search the Web's most popular job boards, places like Freelance Writing Gigs and About Freelance Writing. These sites routinely list content and SEO writing jobs. Writers can also find content jobs at craigslist.org.

      Be Realistic The secret to succeeding at online content writing is for writers to have realistic expectations. They shouldn't expect to make a fortune writing short articles about classic cars or weightlifting.

      Writers also shouldn't expect to make a full-time writing income from their content work. Many writers actually rely on content writing to provide a boost to their traditional freelance-writing income.

    1. I had been an early adopter of learning technologies and when I returned to Warwick I was able to complete further learning including an e-learning award and a Masters in Post Compulsory Education which had provided lots of opportunities to reflect through blogging

      EDTECH connection

  9. Jan 2018
      • audience consensus: little discussion necessary about whether blogs should have DOIs, concrete implementations needed
      • manual DOI registration possible, but of little use
      • API call better, but integration from blogging software necessary
      • SEO also requires exposing metadata => interests align
      • schema.org/BlogPosting suggested
      • https://blog.datacite.org/ uses JSON-LD
      • https://wordpress.org/plugins/schema/
      • sitemap needed so that indexer can find the posts to then extract metadata
      • beta testers from institutions that already register DOIs welcome
    1. So, R.I.P. The Blog, 1997-2013. But this isn’t cause for lament. The Stream might be on the wane but still it dominates. All media on the web and in mobile apps has blog DNA in it and will continue to for a long while. Over the past 16 years, the blog format has evolved, had social grafted onto it, and mutated into Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest and those new species have now taken over. No biggie, that’s how technology and culture work.

      I agree. It is not that blog is dead, or that blogging is no longer an activity worth doing outside Facebooking, Instagramming and Tweeting, or that bloggers are no longer exist. I would say that blog, blogging and blogger are expanding. They just exist in different platform (like Facebook and Pinterest), with different method (people who rant on Facebook .. isn't that blogging?) and as different people (Instagrammers, Facebookers, etc).

  10. Dec 2017
    1. After struggling to come up with a new book idea for so long, I could start to see all the connections between posts, the patterns, the idea planets I keep orbiting. Because it’s all in one place, hyperlinked together, I can see my own obsessions in a way that is much harder elsewhere.
  11. Jul 2017
    1. the role of the blog is different than it was even just a couple of years ago. It’s not the sole outpost of an online life, although it can be an anchor, holding it in place.
  12. Jan 2017
    1. According to a 2015 report by Incapsula, 48.5% of all web traffic are by bots.

      ...

      The majority of bots are "bad bots" - scrapers that are harvesting emails and looking for content to steal, DDoS bots, hacking tools that are scanning websites for security vulnerabilities, spammers trying to sell the latest diet pill, ad bots that are clicking on your advertisements, etc.

      ...

      Content on websites such as dev.to are reposted elsewhere, word-for-word, by scrapers programmed by Black Hat SEO specialists.

      ...

      However, a new breed of scrapers exist - intelligent scrapers. They can search websites for sentences containing certain keywords, and then rewrite those sentences using "article spinning" techniques.

  13. Sep 2016
    1. he personal sense asso-ciated with diaries also enabled “blogger” to emerge as a category, even a professional identity, letting us think of blogs as character vehicles.

      In high school I was an avid reader of a few lifestyle blogs and over time the bloggers would follow me back after gaining a relationship through comments and still follow each other today

  14. Aug 2016
  15. Jun 2016
    1. When Blogging Goes Bad: A Cautionary Tale About Blogs, Email Lists, Discussion, and Interaction

      Krause, Steven D. 2004. “When Blogging Goes Bad: A Cautionary Tale About Blogs, Email Lists, Discussion, and Interaction.” Kairos 9 (1).

    1. Blogging in the Classroom: A Preliminary Exploration of Student Attitudes and Impact on Comprehensio

      Ellison, Nicole B., and Yuehua Wu. 2008. “Blogging in the Classroom: A Preliminary Exploration of Student Attitudes and Impact on Comprehension.” Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia 17 (1): 99–122.

    Tags

    Annotators

  16. Apr 2016
    1. Reasons Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have dominated the Web over blogs and independent sites:

      • People prefer a single interface that makes it easy to flip or scroll through the new stuff. They don't like visiting a dozen different sites with different interfaces.
      • Most people don't want to deal with site structure or complex editors, let alone markup languages or servers.
      • Facebook quickly became a friends-and-family network, which pulled in more of the same.
      • Following and unfollowing should only require a single click.
      • Retweets and mentions introduce new people to follow, even if you aren't looking for them.
      • Reposting should be easy, include obvious attribution, and comments should be attached.
      • RSS readers had the potential to offer these things, but standard ways of using it were not widely adopted. Then Google Reader pushed out other readers, but was nevertheless shut down.

      Let go of the idea of people reading your stuff on your site, and develop or support interfaces that put your readers in control of how they view the web instead of giving the control to the people with the servers.

  17. Dec 2015
    1. Huge follower counts on YouTube and social media DO NOT easily translate to income. And those followers expect you to be "real" -- so they are hostile to advertising and sponsored content.

      Do you own a business? It might pay to offer a salary to the producers of a YouTube channel that reaches your target audience -- in exchange for low-profile "brought to you by" links and mentions that won't offend that audience.

      https://twitter.com/JBUshow<br> https://twitter.com/gabydunn

  18. Apr 2015
    1. In private journals, students take personal risks by writing about their own experiences. For example, Mr. Foster said, in a discussion of whether the American dream still exists, a student writing in a private journal might reflect on her family’s socioeconomic class or financial struggles. But she might hesitate to share something so personal in a public setting. On public blogs, where their classmates will see and perhaps even comment on a post, students engage in more intellectual risks, crafting complex arguments on what are often — especially in sociology courses — controversial issues, Mr. Foster said.

      Blog differences

  19. Jan 2015
    1. Unlike most popularizers (at least of mine), this post didn’t describe a completed piece of research. It just served just an opportunity to riff about an idea I found interesting. But blogging made me realize this idea could be more interesting than I had realized. A “motivated view” of empathy could, for instance, help in understanding illnesses like autism and psychopathy, or thinking up techniques to “grow” empathy. I figured it’d be worth sinking some more effort into it, and wrote a long form academic article on the subject. After much work and a long (but productive) peer review process, that article was published just last week! More importantly, the ideas in that piece—taken over by my students—now drive much new work in my lab that might not have happened otherwise.

      A very interesting point, especially considering the fact that in my own research of science bloggers (#MySciBlog research at LSU), this seems to be a common approach to blogging by scientists/scholars. A scientist/scholarly blogger often starts a blog post with an idea, nugget or concept that they are curious about or interested in learning more about. Many 'intellectuals' also say that blogging helps them collect and clarify their thoughts on a topic or question. The natural result for those engaged in scholarship is for some blogged topics/questions to blossom into larger and more complex ideas and even research questions. I know for myself, several of my blog posts - and especially my some of my freelance science journalism work - has prompted me to pursue complimentary research in my role as a science communication PhD student.

      As an added bonus of being public on the web, the 'blogged' content can elicit feedback from readers and scholars that further pushes the blogger's own ideas and scholarship in new directions.

  20. Oct 2013
    1. The ability to seamlessly insert IPython notebooks into posts was one of the biggest drivers of my switch to Pelican.

      I want to study how Jake integrates IPython notebooks into his blogging. I'll be writing a lot in IPython notebook for my teaching.