10 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2017
    1. Some of the best cross-partisan conversation online happens on sports forums and sports bulletin boards, because, [the assumption is] “Hey, we’re all Patriots fans first, and Democrats and Republicans second.”

      Interesting to think about...

  2. Mar 2017
    1. We have gradually built up a story.

      storytelling common story

    2. Terry, in his solitary picnic, talked of the difficulty of creating the conditions in which his students will want to connect with others in the CLAVIER network.

      common ground desire to connect. Why reach out?

    3. Marcin and Laura joined me on Thursday to talk about translating CLAVIER into their local cultures. They helped me, we are helping each other attempt to make that translation.

      translation respect of context finding common ground difficulty

  3. Sep 2016
    1. And I know how they have suffered more than the pain of exile -- they also know what it’s like to be an outsider, and to struggle, and to work harder to make sure their children can reach higher in America.

      Here again Obama uses the common ground technique to relate himself as a fellow American and to get the sympathetic side of his audience, showing that he too has struggles and suffer just like the every day individual.

    2. So here’s my message to the Cuban government and the Cuban people:  The ideals that are the starting point for every revolution -- America’s revolution, Cuba’s revolution, the liberation movements around the world -- those ideals find their truest expression, I believe, in democracy.

      As President Obama continues his speech over the push for democracy in Cuba, he uses the rhetorical device of common ground to create an environment in which his audience feels as if they are on the same page as the speaker. His comparison of the Cub and American revolution shows that these two events connect us and therefore democracy is possible in both.

    3. And these changes have been welcomed, even though there are still opponents to these policies.  But still, many people on both sides of this debate have asked:  Why now?  Why now?

      Obama used "common ground" to bring together all the oppositions that he may face when discussing the policies. By bringing in something that everyone has been thinking despite the differences they feel, Obama is able to create unity.

    4. There is one simple answer:  What the United States was doing was not working.

      Obama use common ground here to help his cause and befriend the Cubans and continue to build a healthy relationship between the Americans and Cubans.

    5. Creo en el pueblo Cubano.

      Obama addresses the cuban people directly letting them know he believes in them in Spanish. By doing this Obama establishes a common ground with the audience and makes himself seem sincere/ trustworthy about such claims.

    6. Because in many ways, the United States and Cuba are like two brothers who’ve been estranged for many years, even as we share the same blood. We both live in a new world, colonized by Europeans.  Cuba, like the United States, was built in part by slaves brought here from Africa.  Like the United States, the Cuban people can trace their heritage to both slaves and slave-owners.  We’ve welcomed both immigrants who came a great distance to start new lives in the Americas. Over the years, our cultures have blended together.       Dr. Carlos Finlay’s work in Cuba paved the way for generations of doctors, including Walter Reed, who drew on Dr. Finlay’s work to help combat Yellow Fever.  Just as Marti wrote some of his most famous words in New York, Ernest Hemingway made a home in Cuba, and found inspiration in the waters of these shores.  We share a national past-time -- La Pelota -- and later today our players will compete on the same Havana field that Jackie Robinson played on before he made his Major League debut.  (Applause.)  And it's said that our greatest boxer, Muhammad Ali, once paid tribute to a Cuban that he could never fight -- saying that he would only be able to reach a draw with the great Cuban, Teofilo Stevenson.  (Applause.)   So even as our governments became adversaries, our people continued to share these common passions, particularly as so many Cubans came to America.  In Miami or Havana, you can find places to dance the Cha-Cha-Cha or the Salsa, and eat ropa vieja.  People in both of our countries have sung along with Celia Cruz or Gloria Estefan, and now listen to reggaeton or Pitbull.  (Laughter.)  Millions of our people share a common religion -- a faith that I paid tribute to at the Shrine of our Lady of Charity in Miami, a peace that Cubans find in La Cachita. For all of our differences, the Cuban and American people share common values in their own lives.  A sense of patriotism and a sense of pride -- a lot of pride.  A profound love of family.  A passion for our children, a commitment to their education.  And that's why I believe our grandchildren will look back on this period of isolation as an aberration, as just one chapter in a longer story of family and of friendship.

      This section of President Obama's speech is meant to create common ground between Cubans and Americans. This creation of common ground allows Cuban listeners to momentarily put aside the differences between Cuban and American government and culture and focus on the similarities between the two nations. After this creation of common ground, President Obama uses the trust he's built between himself and the Cuban people to open their ears to the issues he wants to talk about.