9 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. "The main lesson is that even though they were all good at recognizing letters, the writing training was the best at every other measure. And they required less time to get there," lead author Professor Robert Wiley, from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, said in a statement. "With writing, you're getting a stronger representation in your mind that lets you scaffold toward these other types of tasks that don't in any way involve handwriting." Every participant in the study was an adult but the scientists are confident that the same for children. The key, they argue, is that handwriting reinforces what is being learned about the letter, such as the sound, beyond their shape. "The question out there for parents and educators is why should our kids spend any time doing handwriting," explained senior author professor Brenda Rapp, from Johns Hopkins University. "Obviously, you're going to be a better hand-writer if you practice it. But since people are handwriting less then maybe who cares? The real question is: Are there other benefits to handwriting that have to do with reading and spelling and understanding? We find there most definitely are."

      Handwriting (as opposed to typing) has been shown to improve the speed at which one learns alphabets.

      https://www.iflscience.com/brain/writing-by-hand-most-effectively-increases-reading-skills/

      Is the effect also seen in other types of learning? What about reading and taking notes by hand versus typing them out?

  2. Oct 2020
  3. Mar 2020
  4. Jul 2019
    1. In Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World, Maryanne Wolf talks about how technology has led to more skimming rather than reading slowly and carefully. She talks about the benefits of “cognitive patience.” And she reminds us that reading quickly isn’t what makes someone a good reader.
  5. Mar 2017
    1. paraph

      An additional flourish on the signature, to make it more distinct and personal. I've been pretty lost for the past 5 pages, but I do like this signature metaphor. We sign things nearly as often as people in the 20th Century did, but we've gotten a lot sloppier thanks to shoddy e-signing on credit card machines. Still, I can look at my signatures and identify them as mine, even though there's no master-signature for me to compare them against. There's a scene in the novel The Talented Mr. Ripley where the bank investigating the disappearance of Tom Ripley does a signature analysis of his recent checks, but they underestimate how long Dickey's been impersonating Tom, so that they're comparing those checks against earlier forgeries.

  6. Jul 2015