19 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. In 2010, the Chronicle of Higher Education asked two dozen scholars “What will be the defining idea of the coming decade, and why?” I wrote that Facebook would end up having more users than the population of China, and that giant social networks, with their madding crowds, would provoke a reaction: Just as the global expansion of fast food begat the slow-food movement, the next decade will see a “slow information” counterrevolution focused on restoring individual thought and creativity. And here we are a decade later, and we’re still hoping for the same thing. Maybe next decade?
  2. Sep 2019
    1. This article takes a long time to get to telling the reader the answer; it wastes their time telling stories which are related to the answer.

  3. Jul 2019
    1. In Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World, Maryanne Wolf talks about how technology has led to more skimming rather than reading slowly and carefully. She talks about the benefits of “cognitive patience.” And she reminds us that reading quickly isn’t what makes someone a good reader.
  4. Mar 2019
  5. Jan 2019
    1. The use of social time may also give us a unique view on understanding slow moving disasters (e.g., environmental events, famines and droughts) when compared to sudden impact events. Social time and social disruption provides tools to define disaster without making assessments (i.e., good/bad) of the event.

      Neal also contends that time embedded in the disaster onset (sudden vs slow) is a better heuristic for studying these events.

    1. He adds that this phase could be important with sudden impacts, but not as important with slow-moving impacts.

      Barton's definition of disaster phases (1970) includes event temporality: slow-moving vs sudden.

  6. Oct 2018
    1. Slow Design (Strauss & Fuad-Luke, 2009) celebrates slowness as an answer to critical issues in design, such as an often-perceived support to consumerism, a restrictive focus on functionalism, the diminishment of users’ engagement with materials, a lack of attention to local idiosyncrasies, and the need to think in the long-term.

      A definition of "slow design" to think sideways for long-term sustainance.

  7. Jul 2018
    1. cance. Waiting, for example (which, given the modern utilitarian approach to time [Zerubavel 1981, pp. 54-59], is generally regarded as an ordeal), is normally associated with worthlessness, and making others wait is often regarded as a symbolic display of deg

      How does this idea of negative time stretch / waiting as insignificance apply to technology or the social coordination process?

      How does "slow technology" overcome this and retain a positive self-reflective value?

    1. The slow technology design agenda, first presented by Hallnäs and Redström [15], builds on the idea that as tech-nologies become more ubiquitous they must do more than prioritise the efficiency and productivity associated with task-completion. In contrast to fast technologies that savetime, the aim with slow technologies is to produce time, by serving as an incitement for reflection.

      This seems like a clearer, more boiled down definition of "slow technology" than found in the Pschetz Temporal Design paper.

    1. The association of alternative approaches to time with a rejection of technology reinforces dichotomies that do not reflect the way people relate to artefacts and systems (Wajcman 2015). As a result, these proposals not only risk being interpreted as nostalgic or backward looking, but also leave little space for integrating more complex accounts of time (particularly those arising in the social sciences) or for discussing more nuanced rhythms, as well as more complex forces and consequences related to temporal decisions. As a result, instead of challenging dominant accounts of time, these proposals arguably reinforce the overarching narrative of universalised acceler

      Argument that slow technology is not anti-technology but should encourage different perspective on how people relate to artifacts and systems via time, rhythms, and other forces that help drive temporal decisions.

    2. gs done. Accepting an invitation for reflection inherent in the design means on the other hand that time willappear, i.e. we open up for time presence” (Hallnas & Redstrom 2001). A slow technology would not disappear, but would make its

      The idea of making time more present/more felt is counter-intuitive to how time is experienced in crisis response as urgent, as a need for effiicency, as an intense flow (Csikszentmihalyi) that disappears.

    3. In Slow Technology, Hallnas & Redstrom (2001) advance the need for a form of design that emphasises reflection, the amplification of environments, and the use of technologies that a) amplify the presence of time; b) stretch time and extend processes; and c) reveal an expression of presenttime as slow-paced. Important here is the concept of “time presence”: “when we use a thing as an efficient tool, time disappears, i.e. we get things done. Accepting an invitation for reflection inherent in the design means on the other hand that time willappear, i.e. we open up for time presence” (Hallnas & Redstrom 2001). A slow technology would not disappear, but would make its

      Definition of "slow technology" and its purpose to make time more present for the user.

  8. Nov 2017
    1. As in Slow Food—with its unhygienic soil, disorderly farmers’ markets, and inconvenient seasons—the annoyances of Slow Computing have become pleasures. With community-made software, there’s no one to blame but us, the community. We’re not perfect, but we’re working on it.

      I really feel like the analogy works. I have for example begun to take pleasure in the messiness of vegetables bought at a farmers' market compared to the seeming perfection of those a a grocery store.

  9. Sep 2017
    1. civic hackers often act as the “slow food movement” of digital political action, embracing local sourcing, ethical consumption, and pleasure of community work. Civic hackers are hardly responding to a new narrative of technological change.

      [...] Civic hackers thus speak against those who propose that the application of technology to politics produces a meta-category of activist.

      Interesante la comparación con el slow food y lo que se puede hacer localmente.

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  10. Nov 2016
  11. Oct 2016
    1. Artificially Slow UI 2016-07-06 The UX Secret That Will Ruin Apps For You Facebook actually slows down its interface to make users feel safe, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed in an email.... various services on the web including travel sites, mortgage engines, and security checks are all making a conscious effort to slow down their omnipotent minds because our puny human brains expect things to take longer.... companies introduce what Kowitz calls an "artificial waiting" pattern into their interfaces. These are status bars, maybe a few update messages, to construct a facade of slow, hard, thoughtful work, even though the computer is done calculating your query. Another good reason to use your own tools (if it's faster than expected, you feel accomplished, not distrusting), or at least re-use indieweb software etc. that others are selfdogfooding because you know they won't be (or there's at least less chance of them) deliberately slowing it down.
  12. Dec 2015
    1. slow readers down

      Does the slow reading movement parallel the slow food one? In some ways, there might be a point against “consumption” in both cases. Or, at least, utilitarianism.

  13. Oct 2015
    1. you can never slow down too much. It’s impossible todisconnect. Right now I’ve got a ferry to catch from Swartz Bay to the GulfIslands, and Tony has a plane to catch at the airport. The idea of islandtime is all about trying, this is the keyword,trying, to slow down.

      Again the idea of being "in time" as a scale. People living with the island state of mind must still take outside influences into account, such as flight departures.

  14. Mar 2014
    1. Delays that are too short cause overreaction, “chasing your tail,” oscillations amplified by the jumpiness of the response. Delays that are too long cause damped, sustained, or exploding oscillations, depending on how much too long. At the extreme they cause chaos. Overlong delays in a system with a threshold, a danger point, a range past which irreversible damage can occur, cause overshoot and collapse.