23 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. “In contrast to Dr. Wood’s claims, bias found in one system is cause for concern in the other, particularly in use cases that could severely impact people’s lives, such as law enforcement applications,” they wrote.

      This is more important than most people probably realise. Recognition bias will decide if a person dies or not, when implemented at substantial scale, which isn't far away.

    1. U.S. securities regulators shot down attempts by Amazon.com Inc to stop its investors from considering two shareholder proposals about the company’s controversial sale of a facial recognition service, a sign of growing scrutiny of the technology.

      Surveillance capitalism at its worst; this behemoth tries to have the people who own it not make decisions.

      Capitalism is like Skynet, an organism that's taken flight on its own, bound to make solipsistic and egoistic judgments and choices.

    1. the manuscripts that were discovered nine years ago, now in the University of Arkansas library with many of her other papers, are mostly complete and easily performed.

      I do recall this happening way more than it should. Not only just A.A but many other colored people. Thousands of art just now being discovered. As a woman of afo-latina descent it makes me proud to know more and more blacks of all ethnicities are becoming prominent in art today.

  2. Oct 2018
    1. Only the most mundane uses of biometrics and facial recognition are concerned with only identifying a specific person, matching a name to a face or using a face to unlock a phone. Typically these systems are invested in taking the extra steps of assigning a subject to an identity category in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and matching those categories with guesses about emotions, intentions, relationships, and character to shore up forms of discrimination, both judicial and economic.
    2. Questions about the inclusivity of engineering and computer science departments have been going on for quite some time. Several current “innovations” coming out of these fields, many rooted in facial recognition, are indicative of how scientific racism has long been embedded in apparently neutral attempts to measure people — a “new” spin on age-old notions of phrenology and biological determinism, updated with digital capabilities.
  3. Aug 2018
    1. In 1992, in the essay “The Politics of Recognition,” Taylor analyzed the advent of multiculturalism in terms similar to the ones Fukuyama uses in “Identity.”
    2. Kojève thought that the other way was through labor. The slave achieves his sense of self by work that transforms the natural world into a human world. But the slave is driven to labor in the first place because of the master’s refusal to recognize him. This “master-slave dialectic” is the motor of human history, and human history comes to an end when there are no more masters or slaves, and all are recognized equally.
    3. The demand for recognition, Fukuyama says, is the “master concept”
  4. Jan 2018
    1. Even the simple act which we describe as "seeing some one we know" is, to some extent, an intellectual process. We pack the physical outline of the creature we see with all the ideas we have already formed about him, and in the complete picture of him which we compose in our minds those ideas have certainly the principal place. In the end they come to fill out so completely the curve of his cheeks, to follow so exactly the line of his nose, they blend so harmoniously in the sound of his voice that these seem to be no more than a transparent envelope, so that each time we see the face or hear the voice it is our own ideas of him which we recognise and to which we listen.

      There is some evidence, though it's not universally accepted, that we have a single neuron for people we know well. Participants in a study had a single neuron that would consistently fire when shown an image of their grandmother and a different one when shown a image of Halle Berry. Psychologists wonder how we can still easily recognize people after they get a dramatic hair cut or something as one would think they would no longer fit our mental image of them.

  5. Dec 2017
    1. Starting Tuesday, any time someone uploads a photo that includes what Facebook thinks is your face, you’ll be notified even if you weren’t tagged.

      This is eerily like in the book The Circle where facial recognition is done over all photos and video on the web--including CCTV. No more secrets.

  6. Mar 2017
    1. I am terribly uncomfortable with badges, labels, official sort of stuff...

      recognition

      resistance

    1. I thought the joy in my eyes and the spontaneous victory sign were appropriate. We are in movement.

      emotion

      recognition

    2. This week Mia Zamora, surprised me by inviting me to join the facilitation team of Connected Courses. To say that I was taken aback by her email, and the ensuing one coming from Claudia would be an understatement, to put it mildly. We need recognition for our particularity. I was not expecting an Oscar from my peers. That's frankly how I felt.

      recognition community present disconnection...

    1. I have been a researcher as long as I can remember. Now they say I am a researcher. (what took them so long to recognise me?)

      Recognition as researcher.

    1. Meanwhile Teresa Mackinnon has been able to represent our rhizomatically evolving project in the UK and elsewhere got it accepted as a case study by a European Project.

      recognition

    2. In August 2013, with my colleagues Christine Rodrigues and now Marcin Kleban we presented again at Eurocall in Portugal a study, Telecollaboration in Historical Spaces, looking at the barriers and openings  to widening connected learning among teachers and learners.

      open recognition community

    3. Suddenly people in my institution appeared to be taking what I had to say seriously..to almost trust me.

      Credit recognition identity

  7. Dec 2016
  8. Dec 2015
  9. Nov 2015
  10. Jul 2015