14 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
    1. Our results show a sustained legacy effect of an intensive glucose-control strategy that appears to be longer than previously reported. These observations indicate that intensive glucose control starting at the time of diagnosis is associated with a significantly decreased risk of myocardial infarction and death from any cause, in addition to the well-established reduction in the risk of microvascular disease. On the basis of extensive trial evidence, strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes emphasize the importance of lipid-lowering therapy with statins21 and of targeted antihypertensive treatment.22-24 (A companion article in this issue of the Journal reports the 10-year, postinterventional data on blood-pressure control from the UKPDS.25) Our results highlight the added importance of glucose lowering in reducing the risk of coronary events and death from any cause. The findings strengthen the rationale for attaining optimal glycemic control and indicate emergent long-term benefits on cardiovascular risk.
  2. Mar 2022
    1. modificar la historia

      No diria tanto como modificar la historia, me pienso en la posibilidad de enriquecer la historia contada desde diferentes orillas.

  3. Jan 2022
    1. Milan Kundera tells us that the struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.

      .memoria .resistencias .j6 .microfascismos

    1. My composition is greatly aided both 20 years' worth of mnemonic slurry of semi-remembered posts and the ability to search memex.craphound.com (the site where I've mirrored all my Boing Boing posts) easily. A huge, searchable database of decades of thoughts really simplifies the process of synthesis.

      Cory Doctorow's commonplace makes it easier to search, quote, and reuse in his process of synthesis.

  4. Dec 2021
    1. the advantage of forgetting was recognized by scholars with increasing enthusiasm between the second half of the sixteenth and the first half of the seventeenth centuries.

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  5. Nov 2021
    1. Excerpting requires effort and thus combats natural laziness; inhis regimen there is no reading without taking notes, which would be idleand vain, and no time wasted because every free moment can be put to usereading over one’s notes (seeA,p. 84).

      Even early in the history of note taking treatises Jeremias Drexel acknowledges the idea that good note taking, and particularly excerpting, takes work.

      Modern students seem to have now lost both the ars memoria as well as the note taking arts which helped supplant it. We really need to be able to regain both of these traditions, but it will obviously take commitment to do the work.

    2. Drexel emphasizesthe difficulty of image-based arts of memory and how short-lived are theirresults: “Great labor places so many images of things in this treasury ofmemory; but no amount of labor has managed to preserve them there forlong without excerpts” (A, p. 3). Instead, for Drexel excerpting is the onlysure way to retain material for the long term. Drexel insists too that, farfrom detracting from memory, note taking is the best aid to memory.

      Jeremias Drexel is certainly a writer who complains about the work of the ars memoria, particularly for long term memory and supplants it with writing/note taking.

  6. Aug 2021
    1. Like so manynaturalists of the Enlightenment, he was familiar with a wide variety of textual techniques, manyof which were direct descendants of the compositional and pedagogical tools used to harness themnemonic utility of words inscribed on the clean spaces of erasable surfaces such as librellos dememoria and chalk boards, or upon more permanent forms of print such as commonplace books(adversaria), cabinet labels, marginaliaand printed books.

      Some interesting concepts to explore here.

  7. May 2021
    1. With some continued clever searching today along with some help from an expert in Elizabethan English, I've found an online version of Robert Copland's (poor) translation from the French, some notes, and a few resources for assisting in reading it for those who need the help.

      The text:

      This is a free text transcription and will be easier to read than the original black-letter Elizabethan English version.

      For those without the background in Elizabethan English, here are a few tips/hints:

      For the more obscure/non-obvious words:

      Finally, keep in mind that the letter "y" can often be a printer's substitution for the English thorn character) Þ, so you'll often see the abbreviations for "the" and as an abbreviation for "that".

      Copland's original English, first printing of Ravenna can be accessed electronically through a paid Proquest account at most universities. It is listed as STC 24112 if you have access to a firewall-free site that lets you look at books on Early English Books Online (EEBO). A photocopy can be obtained through EEBO reprints on Amazon. Unless you've got some reasonable experience with Elizabethan black-latter typography, expect this version to be hard to read. It isn't annotated or modernized.

      @ehcolston I'm curious to hear what the Wilson/Pena text looks like. I'm guessing it's not scholarly. I think Wilson is a recent college grad and is/was a publishing intern at a company in the LA Area. I'm not sure of Pena's background. I suspect it may be a version of the transcribed text I've linked with a modest updating of the middle English which they've self-published on Amazon.

      Of course, given the multiple translations here, if anyone is aware of a more solid translation of the original Latin text into English, do let us know. The careful observer will notice that the Latin version is the longest, the French quite a bit shorter, and the English (Copland) incredibly short, so there appears to be some untranslated material in there somewhere.

    2. I haven't searched all the versions of Peter of Ravenna's name (yet) in all locations, but I recall hearing of an Italian version as well (and it's likely that there was one given its popularity).

      A bit of digging around this morning has uncovered a digital copy of a French translation in the Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de santé (Paris).:

      Given the date and the scant 16 pages, this is likely to be the edition which was the source of Robert Copland's English translation. As the edition doesn't appear to have an author, it's possible that this was the reason that Copland's translation didn't list one either.

      The Latin -> French -> middle English -> modern English route seems an awfully muddy way to go, but without anything else, it may have to suffice for some of us for the moment.

  8. Apr 2021
    1. My "Memoria Technica" is a modification of Gray's;

      Because of the likelihood that Gray is a misspelling, it is most likely the case that he's referring here to Richard Grey)'s method from the book Memoria Technica, or, a New Method of Artificial Memory (1730).

      Could they have known each other personally? Might be worth checking his massive correspondence.

  9. Dec 2020
    1. Constructing Noah’s Arkserves to arrange the historical, theological, and psychological teaching ofOn Noah’sArkin a voluminous and intricate design, which, in turn, can be richly meditated uponin the tradition of monasticmemoria spiritalis.
  10. Sep 2016
    1. experiencia

      Cuando un período histórico violento llega a su fin, ¿qué crees que es mejor: olvidarlo para evitar recuerdos dolorosos o recordar lo sucedido? ¿Qué consecuencias crees que puede tener cada acción?

    2. violencia

      En muchos casos, la ficción recrea episodios dramáticos o de violencia que ocurrieron de verdad, ya sea a través del cine, la literatura, la música, la pintura o cualquier otra manifestación artística. ¿Se te ocurre algún ejemplo?