17 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. There are many excellent available resources about how to introduce zines into higher education (check out this excellent Resource List from Barnard College), but for a few examples: Sakina Laksimi-Morrow, Teaching and Learning Center Fellow at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, invited fellow graduate students to share their teaching assignments and syllabi in Developing a Socially Conscious Pedagogy. Simmons College librarian Dawn Stahura has written about working with a faculty member to read and develop zines in a Sociology class, relating to content about eating disorders.

      Links to zine learning experiences collected by Elvis Bakaitis.

    2. Zines as Open Pedagogy

      My annotations here are a (partial) record of how I'm going through this open education assignment while playing "open education experience bingo".

      My bingo card for this learning experience record will be published on my blog. Caveat: I didn't end up making an annotation for everything I checked off on the bingo card.

    3. the discomfort of grading highly personal work. Sometimes keeping the spirit of “open pedagogy” may involve the idea of “closed” –  considerations of student privacy, personal spaces, and making it equally ok to restrict access

      Openness on including and/or creating new/different evaluation strategies that are sensitive to personal dimensions of works produced in the experience.

    4. there’s a strong overlap between the representation of queer, or otherwise marginalized authors, and this very welcoming, open format

      Openness on including people.

    1. What Open Education Taught Me

      My annotations here are a record of how I'm going through this student's reflection on open education experiences while playing "open education experience bingo".

      My bingo card for this learning experience record is published on my blog.

    2. To Put Yourself Out There and Make Connections

      Openness in connecting to people.

    3. To Trust the System

      Wow. This seems contradictory, but in a good way?

      Trust in the system (of openness) because it will help you expand your horizons.

      Openness in reflecting on roles and recognition, and connecting on recognition.

    4. My professors are still learning too.

      Openness on surfacing and including roles.

    5. To Collaborate With My Peers

      This is a very rich section: openness in developing skills, connecting materials, skills, roles, feedback and evaluation to other learners, and including other learners in the experience.

    6. Open education comes down to one word: accountability.

      Openness on surfacing and reflecting on roles and design.

    7. To Take Control of My Education

      Openness on reflecting about design.

    8. To Keep An Open Mind

      Openness on reflecting about materials.

  2. Apr 2015
    1. There are several other important considerations related to LEB. First, there is a risk of capture of legislation by the domestic industry. Once an inefficient industry comes to rely on LEB for survival, the Ukrainian parliament might find it difficult to rescind the ban in the future. Second, LEB and other similar measures underscore that the Ukrainian parliament finds it acceptable to intervene in functioning of the markets based on empirically dubious rationale. The parliament substitutes the market by deciding how resources should be allocated. In doing so, the parliament teaches the businesses and the industry that they should compete through lobbying in the parliament, financial and informational, rather than through innovation and efficiency improvement in the market place.