4 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2020
    1. Thanks for posting this helpful, well written article. Learning programming, or any other thing one takes up, requires you to sit at one place have a plan of action for your study.

      I was going through my Firefox bookmarks and I found article. I had read this article two years back and had commented that I found it to be useful. I read it back in May 2018. As of now, November 2020, my programming skills are still novice-level. I haven't implemented the ideas or followed suggestions given here.

      It has been 2 years and 5 months since I found this article to be relevant and it baffles me that I haven't taken action by making use of the knowledge given in this article. Two long years flew by. I guess reviewing my bookmarks is something that I will do more often.

      The article was posted on May 23, 2018 and I had stumbled on it the next day itself, i.e., May 24, 2018. This gets me thinking that we could finds solutions for problems(latest ones in this case) once we identify it, articulate it, hit the search button and just read stuff. I could presume that what happened next was that I misunderstood "finding a solution" to "realizing the solution", and perhaps became complacent or maybe there were more problems that didn't come to my awareness to identify and further find solutions. I'm not quite sure. Should I have identified my problems and googled more so that I could have learned C and C++ sooner?

      I wonder what held me back from taking action to accomplish and master something that usually takes not more that 5-6 months maximum.

  2. Jul 2020
    1. Introducing Module#const_source_locationUsing Method#source_location made finding the location of any method fairly easy. Unfortunately, there wasn’t an equivalent for constants. This meant that unless the constant you needed to find was defined in your codebase, finding its source location was not easy.
    2. When FrozenError is raised, it is usually difficult to determine from the context which was the frozen object that a modification was attempted on.Ruby 2.7 introduces FrozenError#receiver which will return the frozen object that modification was attempted on, similar to NameError#receiver. This can help pinpoint exactly what is the frozen object.
  3. Apr 2019
    1. “Neuroscience research shows that the only way we can change the way we feel is by becoming aware of our inner experience and learning to befriend what is going inside ourselves.”