828 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
    1. So what do you think?

      Thanks for sharing ... this does sound like CLMOOC to me ...

    2. pretty

      pretty but not too pretty ... there's always a sense of "draft" in the work of the community ... I think it's important to articulate that most of CLMOOC is always "in process" and the reflection element is key to the experience, not the finished products ... I'm not sure if I am articulating what I am thinking ... It's a compliment to say CLMOOC always has some rough edges ...

    3. Communicative conversations

      I'm glad this element is surfacing ... sometimes, I feel like I get so wrapped up in the fun and creative work that I lose track of the meta-thinking of it all ... and how it might play out for students in classrooms (which is one of the aims of CLMOOC -- get educators into the field of play so they bring their students into the field of play).

    4. I can never remember the actual title of my thesis

      CLMOOC Name the Thesis Contest ....

    5. 40K tweets

      Wow .... that's a lot of stuff ...

    6. CLMOOC

      Word Cloud from these words

    7. emergent and thus unplanned

      The "planning for the unexpected" is the best part of the CLMOOC experience (at least for me), and the most difficult, and requires facilitators to be ready to highlight an unexpected thread of conversation or creativity, and go with it, supporting both the initial spark and the map that suddenly appears.

    8. creative playfulness

      here is a key phrase, I think. If it's not playful, people won't engage. And if it's not creative, they won't continue. The first year of CLMOOC, this was a key conversation because we knew teachers in summer wanted to do something different, something fun, something interesting. All of the Make Cycles were designed with this in mind (in hopes that this ethos would then shift into classroom experiences later on for students)

  2. Apr 2019
    1. doing the same thing

      network of networks

    2. Chicago has more than 200 different youth serving organizations offering various forms of volunteer-based tutoring and/or mentoring in non-school hours.

      And as you often note, you use Chicago because that's where you are and where your work is situated ... but many places have networks and organizations that people can tap into ... it takes some looking. Or it takes creating those networks yourself for others to find.

    3. I think this is one of the major problems facing the world. Too much information. Too few using it.

      Yep, and we have yet to reach a place where these things are balanced out. It's a struggle, for attention, for action, for connecting to our neighborhoods, to others.

    1. These examples demonstrate Kara’s efforts to help her students critically examine place and see themselves as actors in creating a “consequential geography” (Soja, 2010, p. 1), particularly of the spaces they call home.

      This seems most important ....

    2. Kara also required her students to explore food options available in a one-mile radius around their school to determine whether they were part of a food desert

      Maybe she did this but it would be neat to see this as a map ... maybe even a layered map, with student narratives overlayed on top (like with ThingLink or something)

    3. Urban spaces, for example, are dense ecologies with complex networks of materials (both “natural” and human-made) and histories of race, class, and power dynamics (e.g., changing neighborhood demographics, systemic housing discrimination).

      and maybe history is another layer in this dense geography -- what has happened before echoing (for good or for not) into what is happening now in any given space ...

  3. quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com
    1. I'd rather be a tall, ugly weed

    2. "Drop a Mouse into Poetry"
    3. learned to breathe fresh air

      Fresh air; breathing -

      seemingly uncaring, deepening

      the world, packed full of sharing,

      pairing up city rhymes to street rhythms

      in a line of ideas - go on and fill 'em -

      feel 'em, they're all about the scaring you -

      white 'burbs with earbuds dangling -

      regaling you with words you've never heard,

      the air fresh, from the breathing:

      this is the season for believing in the poem

    4. Funny it seems, but by keeping it's dreams

      I am a sucker for internal rhymes. Although these lyrics (for me) don't always hold up as a poem on its own, the art of internal rhyme to create rhythm against the backdrop of bass and drums is a key element of HipHop that I greatly admire. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfgR2bEjAFg

    5. concrete
    6. I'd rather be unseen

      Making a choice? Or maybe not ...

    7. the abyss of the bizarre

      This is where

      we go when we

      have no other place

      to take us

    8. wind-wavering

      Not just alliteration here, but also evocative of standing on the cliff, looking out ....

  4. Mar 2019
    1. Indigenous Peoples Day

      In the neighboring town, middle school students pushed and argued for this change, which has had some ripple effect in our communities. read more

    1. The online affinity network of Ravelry, and opportunities for online distribution and sales, vastly expanded Amy’sability to pursue a specialized interest, develop expertise, and connect this interest

      While my gut reaction is not to monetize learning, this viewpoint of mine seems naive when you take a larger look at why people do what they do, and why finding economic success with creative endeavors is important.

    2. Her passion for the fiber arts has even sparked a similar interest in her parents. Her mother has started to crochet,and her father has picked up knitting.

      I find this interesting -- that the child's interest sparks the interest of the parents. I'd love to hear their story about what they saw unfolding with Amy and Ravelry.

    1. I started seeing myself as a strong Black male, and smart. My mind started thinkin’ I’m someone makin’ a difference.

      This is powerful insight.

    2. counter images that falsely portray their intellec-tual abilities, academic acuity, cultural competencies, and sociohistorical realities.

      I am thinking of how the recent trend in adolescent literature is finally doing some of this -- showing us the lives and thoughts of people from diverse backgrounds and experiences, and how valuable that is for understanding each other. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-huIZghog8o

    3. Out here, I don’t worry ’bout that

      Such a stark contrast between sense of identity inside the school vs outside in the community/world. How do we as teachers find a way to bring those worlds together in meaningful ways? This is what we need to be considering ... (as we are, here, and elsewhere). His voice here is a powerful reminder of that.

    1. it is unlikely that she would have found a critical mass of knitters who are also Harry Potter fans

      This is the narrow element -- of finding others with your niche interest -- that makes online Affinity Networks potentially so powerful. It is also empowering to find others of your tribe when you didn't even know your tribe existed.

    2. Ravelry

      This is now the third or fourth reference to Ravelry that I have come across in the past month in terms of spaces that are incredibly supportive as Affinity Spaces for all newcomers and mentors. It's been referenced in Networked Narratives, and in DS106, and now here. I wonder what attributes Ravelry has that make it such a powerful experience for so many? And is it replicable?

    3. knitters

    4. Harry Potter

    5. Introduction

      Start annotation here ...

    6. This is a way to annotate part of the book for CLMOOC book club. Go down about halfway and a first section is shared here.

  5. Feb 2019
    1. We focus on how their engagements in nonschool, community-based, social justice initiatives represent strategic attempts to resist and counter deficit narratives or ideologies

      Connected Learning connections?

    2. rown v. Board of Education dec

    3. We agree with Mann’s and Gonzalez’s beliefs about public education and the need to provide opportunities for people to actively participate in a democratic, multiracial, and multiethnic society.

      I agree, too. I wonder how the Charter School debate plays out in this, though. Charter Schools are public schools, but they exist off to the side. Do they also contribute to the greater good? The ethics of what happens to existing public schools as Charter Schools siphon off resources is a real debate.

  6. Jan 2019
    1. Wenger’s (1998) useful concept of constellations of communities of practice is important for understanding the significance of belonging, shared identity, and learning about matters of practice that teachers self-identify as necessary to their ongoing development.

      Important concepts. Also, in online places, we often refer to the idea of Affinity Spaces, which has similar resonance. From Gee's work: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affinity_space

    2. ocial justice teaching

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B29PLiltESs Social Justice is at the heart of our mission statement for the Western Massachusetts Writing Project -- all programs designed through WMWP must reflect our mission statement. This all comes out of work done years ago with NWP's Project Outreach, whose resonance continues at our site today.

    1. value

      What's your take on his work?

    2. Alchemy

      How has the word and term "Alchemy" been misused over the years? Anything come to mind?

    3. can art supersede the craftwork of God?

      Whoah. Whatever your spiritual leanings (if any), this is an interesting query, right? I imagine the debates sparked by this must have been fierce.

    4. Newton’s alchemical manuscripts include a rich and diverse set of document types, including laboratory notebooks,

    5. chymistry

      Interesting spelling and word ...

    6. a lot of people just watching and trying to figure out what’s going on.

      I wonder if this is due to the need to belief in the unknown -- which is always something that has stirred the creative spirit in a lot of people.

    7. I taught the History of Science

      Hi John I am curious about how one leaps from history of science into digital learning -- I can see a path but wonder about you found it (or maybe, how you created that path).

    1. I'll look forward to connecting with you.

      I hope more people take you up on your offer ...

    2. These data resources are not profit centers. Thus, they don't qualify for investment zone capital.

      Conundrum ...

    3. they are part of the mix of youth and family support organizations needed to help bring a neighborhood out of deep poverty

    4. to identify places where people need help,

      So important ...

    1. narratives

      This tree has a story to tell

      its white leaves memory

      its roots dug deep underground

      its song a silent reminder

      of the connected soil

    2. imaginings

      Imagining

      things, again

      things I can't see

      things I only wonder about

      when snow covers all still to born

    1. dark ink

      What it is about dark ink? Gel pens -- those light pink and yellow and green ink things that my students love to use for the color and the sparkle-- will be the death of my old eyes. I want dark on light. Words etched into stone. Thick black sharpies leaving trails on white walls.

    2. spine of a dead tree

      Where we walk

      among the brambles

      where dead bugs

      tell no tales

      the spine of this dead

      tree never fails

      to intrigue me.

    3. Innotation

      I like this examination of both inside the text (and with the text) and outside the text (alongside the text). Both have value but both are different. In one (innotation), I am writing WITH you. In the other (annotation), I am writing BESIDE you. Where does one merge into the other?

    1. ontological

      Ontological:

      I don't know this word. Or at least, not enough to automatically recall its meaning. That happens sometimes, where a word has some faint echoes -- like, maybe you looked this one up before but only now remember that you once looked it up -- and yet, you can't draw the lines. So, I looked it up. The definition (below) is more confusing than the word. So here is where I pause, stop and think: this word is my hurdle to understanding, and the flow of my reading has come to a stop. I think I might just hop/skip/jump over it, then. I am the master of this distraction.

      from Wikipedia:

      Ontology is the philosophical study of being. More broadly, it studies concepts that directly relate to being, in particular becoming, existence, reality, as well as the basic categories of being and their relations.[1] Traditionally listed as a part of the major branch of philosophy known as metaphysics, ontology often deals with questions concerning what entities exist or may be said to exist and how such entities may be grouped, related within a hierarchy, and subdivided according to similarities and differences.

    2. perspective

      Take a moment to wander outside, and kneel down, into the grass and soil, and look closer. Give yourself some perspective on this world. What you see is the micro of our place. It's interesting to do this now and then to remind us that we are not the only creatures and living things inhabiting this space, that other worlds turn inside of ours. We just never notice. Take a moment to notice, won't you?

    3. crash

      I have a friend, who works at the Wall Street Journal, who texts me and my friends regularly about the coming economic crash. I have trouble telling if he is overreacting to the political events of the day (he is a fine conspiracy theory activist) or is right in tune. I, too, am wary of where the economy is going and while numbers suggest some stability, it all feels false. Too many people still struggling. Too many Wall Street companies getting rich quick. If the crash is coming, is anyone ready?

    4. researcher

      I like to think that all of us are researchers, to some degree. In the various regular writing I do -- looking at the small moments with SmallStories, for example -- I think of this as research, of examining the world. Researchers notice things. They put a larger frame around what they see. They write to understand it. Even if it is only you, stopping a moment to see something you might otherwise pass by, that's some kind of research. It won't get you that PHD, but it will give you pause. And pausing is something, too.

    5. dependent

      We're in a sort of strange time here in our house. Two of three boys don't really live here -- they are in college -- and the third boy, 14, is both blessed and curses by all of our attention now. We do joke about this, a lot. Even he joins in. Still, I am sympathetic towards him and yet, feeling a bit nostalgic for the crazy, hectic days of three kids in the house, and I even appreciate (now, later) the chaos of it all. This is life, though, and another chapter. At least we have the baby, 14, for a few more years.

    6. Anna -- I am reading your rewriting and finding key words for small essays in the margins. Kevin

    7. writing

      How is it that writing became so important to me? I'm thinking back, trying to remember any one single event or teacher that hooked me into it. I only draw blank. Perhaps it was my mother's love of books, and my own love of libraries and books as a child, that led me to understand the power of story and writing. I don't remember loving writing in school, at any grade, although a few classes here and there in college -- mostly, electives -- gave me more freedom to write in different genres, and that opened the door a bit. I'd like to think that, as a teacher, I can inspire some of my students to become life-long writers, but maybe that is just the hope of teachers everywhere. And who knows if it comes true?

    8. anticipate

      At teacher lunches, we often talk about our students, and a common refrain over the years has been a lack of patience and perseverance by young people. Our students don't want to mull over something or to dig deeper, the criticism goes. They want the answer now. Many of my colleagues blame video games and technology on this decreasing attention, and it may be true, but I often find myself resisting this blame game, and I wonder about how it is we are teaching and what learning looks like to our students. It does no good to cast blame on the kids in front of us if we aren't reflecting and changing what we're doing to ensure we meet their needs.

    9. blue car

      My mom had a blue car -- a blue Grenada, if I remember right. It looked like a police car, if the blue of a police car had been lightened by a spray paint can. I remember driving her car -- it was a standard -- to high school parties in woods and sometimes, people would scatter, thinking the police were arriving to break up the party. Only to discover me, in my mom's blue Grenada.

    10. orientation

      I stop and think of a compass. The way north always seems to pull us forward into some unknown space. people follow a compass rather blindly, don't we? We expect it to work. Same with GPS. We expect it to work and walk with faith that north is where we'll end up. Sometimes, we get lost.

  7. Dec 2018
    1. We are allwriters
    2. spoken word poetry
    3. The youth will lead the revolution.

    4. multiple genres

    5. ee themselves as writers

    6. The work that we do in Writing Our Lives can serve as a site of healing and for resisting and working against violence.

    7. Parents and community members understood writing to be the timed writing tasks for standardized exams or the demonstration of the conventions of writing on school assignments,

    8. here was, however, deep frustration with the current state of education for African American children by several community members and parents, including me

    9. mentors

    10. I define radical youth literacies as ways of knowing, doing, writing, and speaking by youth who are ready to change the world

    11. From his bedroom to his neighborhood streets, he wrote and composed music lyrics, uploaded audio files, and directed music videos.

    12. Writing Our Lives

  8. Nov 2018
    1. In classrooms, testimony to experience is always present, whether explicitly invited or authorized, as the bodies of teachers and students tell stories of connection, disconnection, care, dismissal, belonging, and exclusion.

      This seems like a real anchor point of the piece for me ... how to ensure our classrooms are spaces where this kind of sharing and understanding, and compassion and empathy, might happen.

    2. Hurricane Katrina was a natural disaster felt by a nation through the images and stories in the media.

      And later, through deeper narratives

  9. Oct 2018
    1. t is the oppressive and symbolically violent use of the essentials of our discipline—words, rhetoric, and modes of communica-tion—that sticks to us most in the ongoing aftermath of the election

      Words matter.

    2. we also recognize that some readers did

      Good to acknowledge this. The votes didn't come out of nowhere. They came from within various communities, and communities of practice.

    3. I am struggling with how to teach today and the next few days.

      This sounds like something I said to my wife. And she said to me. And we all said to each other.

    1. There must be a better system, and I would have hoped that bright minds in Washington, D.C., could sit down and work out a solution that takes into account all of the concerns that have been raised.

      All the more reason that voting is important -- they are our elected officials.

    1. Lina Mounzer

      Thank you for this piece. For its power and beauty and insights and experience.

    2. Language gives the individual the power and strength of the collective. And writing, speaking, telling stories—wielding language in narrative form—has the ability to transform the collective through the individual experience.

      This is the center of the whole piece, to me.

    3. Who is the reader I’m addressing

      We are the readers ...

    4. there is no real resolution to the trauma of the collective. It lives on in all the stories you will ever tell from now on, in all the stories that will be passed down along the line of culture, even when they are about something else.

      Interesting insights ... writing about many lingers longer than writing about one person.

    5. Trying to rewrite my past in an effort to not have to translate it.

      The writer pivots here, to self.

    6. these I’s bump up into one another again and again until they are accidentally shattered, the various pieces of these commingled selves becoming, for long moments, indistinguishable from one another.

      (found poem from text)

      from you

      comes I

      for I have

      become you;

      these words

      now of us

      co-mingle,

      indistinguishable

      in these long moments

      where we both emerge

      accidentally shattered

      by story.

  10. Sep 2018
    1. And two contradictory things become true at once: that despite the fact I am attempting to reproduce her words as faithfully as I can, they must now re-emerge in words unavoidably my own.

      Here is the contradiction of the translator, I suppose.

    2. they are constantly traversing borders both visible and invisible

    3. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut

      Wait.

      So the stories above are not her stories ... she is translating and then writing of their experiences. Ok. Some sort of formatting should have made that more obvious to the reader. (Is that just me who feels this way?)

      I get this was a literary approach, and now I see the rest of the piece unfolds from a writer as translator, affected by the stories of the women bloggers.

      I think what I mean is, by annotating as I was reading, I felt as if I were with her -- now, a composite her -- speaking to her in the margins (along with all of you) -- and realizing the writer was removed, and only telling the stories of others, makes me want to go back and edit my remarks. I won't.

      But I never had that feeling before with annotation activities.

      Interesting ....

      Reading on ....

    4. Fatma

      I looked up the meaning of the name. Fatma. From this site:

      ... a girls' name is of Arabic derivation, and the meaning of the name Fatma is "baby's nurse". Fatma is a variant form of Fatima (Arabic): also possibly "one who abstains".

      I am thinking of that second meaning -- "one who abstains" -- and thinking of war and the powerless nature of those caught up in the war. Abstain from the chaos was not a choice Fatma or her mother (the writer) or the father had here.

    1. Bourdieu and Passeronmay not refer to Freire by name, but they condemn all such “populistpedagogies” as misguided.

      Interesting ...

    2. “banking” system of education in which teachers pour knowledge into the supposedly empty brains of their students.

    3. School

      Why capitalized? Wondering about the context here ....

    4. BOURDIEU

      I don't know who this is. So, I am wandering away for a bit to try to figure it out.

      Pierre Bourdieu

    5. FREIRE
  11. Aug 2018
    1. Here we are, going beyond skimming. In the margins. Terry took this piece over into Diigo for his annotation. Read his thoughts: https://www.diigo.com/annotated/30d001f7e33fbb45a08b27cbdc58e9a4 Others are here, off to the side. Please join in.

    2. Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World

    3. We need to cultivate a new kind of brain: a “bi-literate” reading brain capable of the deepest forms of thought in either digital or traditional mediums. 

      Huh

    4. use it or lose it

    5. fourth and fifth grade

      This age -- eight to ten years old -- seems critical in so many areas, not just screen reading and comprehension. It's also the same age here in the US where standardized testing kicks in, and where so many kids lose their love of learning as a result. That's my opinion, anyway.

    6. technology of recurrence
    7. skimming

    8. Results indicated that students who read on print were superior in their comprehension to screen-reading peers, particularly in their ability to sequence detail and reconstruct the plot in chronological order.

      Be helpful to know why ... what was different for the students?

    9. the reading circuit

    10. “cognitive impatience,”

      I agree with Ciara on Twitter about this term -- I like it.

      Cognitive Patience

    11. In this hinge moment between print and digital cultures, society needs to confront what is diminishing in the expert reading circuit, what our children and older students are not developing, and what we can do about it.

      As a teacher of children, this is a key point -- one I grapple with every time I use technology with my young writers and readers. Am I providing a richer and more engaging content with digital text? Or am I teaching more surface reading of text with media intrusions? (prob neither and both)

    12. This is not a simple, binary issue of print vs digital reading and technological innovation.

      Thank you -- we want to make it clear that this is not an either/or situation here. Appreciate this statement early in the text

    13. My research depicts how the present reading brain enables the development of some of our most important intellectual and affective processes: internalized knowledge, analogical reasoning, and inference; perspective-taking and empathy; critical analysis and the generation of insight.

      interesting .... the act of reading is always deeper, and forges deeper connections, than we think it might be ...

    14. read stories
    15. the neuronal circuit that underlies the brain’s ability to read is subtly, rapidly changing - a change with implications for everyone from the pre-reading toddler to the expert adult.

      This has long been a concern, and I know there is all sorts of research happening in this field. I don't doubt this at all... what I don't know yet is whether this change in the way we read text is good or bad or neither. This article suggests a negative shift, and that may be true. Always hoping for some balance.

    16. older boys

      Girls play video games, too. Boys read books, too.

  12. Jun 2018
    1. Digital writing requires us to rethink our approach to text, textual analysis, and the ways in which we build our arguments from evidence that was, heretofore, invisible.

    2. Please join me—and the other contributors to this issue—and continue the conversation

      Answering the call with this annotation activity .. thanks, Troy!

    3. http://knightlab.com/)

      Need to explore? Me, too.

      https://knightlab.northwestern.edu/

    4. create rich, ethnographic portraits of their homes, neighborhoods, schools, stores, and other spaces

      During one round of Hear My Home, I had taken my friend Anna's soundscape and refashioned it into a multimedia piece, complete with poem:

      Check out Anna's Soundscape on Zeega

    5. Rhythms of recent riots, pulses of contemporary protest marches, and the acoustics of American sit-ins serve as a starting point to explore the sonic intensities and politics of sound. In recent weeks, individuals have taken to the streets to demonstrate alliance with and affinity for making their collective voices heard.

      Found Poem from That Passage:

      starting pulse;

      the streets

      make rhythms of

      our voices, heard,

      the American acoustics

      of politics, march

      in protest, explore

      contemporary sound.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIZ-uG2UTgI

      (with apologies to Cassie and Jon)

    6. #hearmyhome” project

      Hear My Home

      f you are an educator, in what ways can you imagine incorporating and building soundscapes into your curriculum and practice as a classroom teacher? What benefits and/or constraints do you anticipate for yourself and/or your students?

    7. digital writing requires that we explore all forms of media as text worthy of analysis, especially when students are actively composing texts with numerous options such as these.

    8. Digital writing requires that we explore all forms of media as text worthy of analysis, including what could otherwise be dismissed as just ambient noise.

    9. Digital writing requires time, space, and attention, as well as an inquiry stance.

    10. et’s take a look at the future that’s happening right now

      If I may, I have a Flipboard Magazine that I try to curate pieces about writing, teaching, learning and technology -- and how digital writing is pushing the boundaries of composition.

      Along the Edges of Digital Writing

    11. What it means to teach the English language arts with websites, apps, and social media continues to evolve quickly, both in terms of the tools as well as in terms of the practices.

      And not all professional development has caught up -- this is the value of programs like EdCamp (where teachers lead the way) and the National Writing Project (my professional home as a teacher for the way ideas can bubble up from the classroom, and the 'teachers teaching teacher' is professional practice).

    12. my book was able to keep the focus on the writing and the technology

      I recommended this book to many people for this reason -- the focus was on the writing and the learning and development of the writer, not the technology itself. We too often get lost in the new and cool tech, and lose sight of the learning (and the reality that many of the tools now here will be gone, so adapting to technology platforms and environments is key.)

    13. The Digital Writing Workshop (2009)
  13. May 2018
    1. https://ww2.kqed.org/education/collections/do-now/
    2. Kevin Hodgson (@dogtrax on Twitter)

      Aww ...

    3. Troy Hicks

      Troy Hicks has written extensively over the years about digital writing, and technology for expanding the notions of writing. I find his best work to be about how writing workshop might make a transition with the use of different aspects of technology. His focus is always on the learning and the writing, not the technology itself. Troy and I know each other through the National Writing Project and other adventures. Troy's blog is a good one to follow.

    4. This piece comes from the NCTE journal -- Voices from the Middle -- May 2018. You can find the journal here.

    1. "People"' from the book Selected Poems by Yevgeny Yevtushenko.

    2. men

      hard to get past this narrow gender descriptions ... even understanding the time period ...

    3. A guitar teacher, unlike a guitar, can be neither classified in a museum nor owned by the public nor rented from an educational warehouse. Teachers of skills belong to a different class of resources from objects needed to learn a skill.

      Even as he acknowledges the role of teacher, he then goes on to say, maybe teachers aren't needed at all (cassette tape replacements). He's really quite bitter about teachers, isn't he? Remember this?

    4. 1. Reference Services to Educational Objects-which facilitate access to things or processes used for formal learning. Some of these things can be reserved for this purpose, stored in libraries, rental agencies, laboratories, and showrooms like museums and theaters; others can be in daily use in factories, airports, or on farms, but made available to students as apprentices or on off hours. 2. Skill Exchanges--which permit persons to list their skills, the conditions under which they are willing to serve as modelsfor others who want to learn these skills, and the addresses at which they can be reached. 3. Peer-Matching--a communications network which permits persons to describe the learning activity in which they wish to engage, in the hope of finding a partner for the inquiry. 4. Reference Services to Educators-at-Large--who can be listed in a directory giving the addresses and self-descriptions of professionals, paraprofessionals, and free-lancers, along with conditions of access to their services. Such educators, as we will see, could be chosen by polling or consulting their former clients.

      Ok. Interesting, these mostly connect nicely with Connected Learning principles.

    5. The child grows up in a world of things, surrounded by people who serve as models for skills and values. He finds peers who challenge him to argue, to compete, to cooperate, and to understand; and if the child is lucky, he is exposed to confrontation or criticism by an experienced elder who really cares.

      This is at the heart of Connected Learning -- students following their own muse for academic exploration, using peers to guide thinking and tapping into mentors in the field to provide a path forward into inquiry.

    6. Their purpose must be to facilitate access for the learner: to allow him to look into the windows of the control room or the parliament, if he cannot get in by the door.

      Her, too.

    7. Learners should not be forced to submit to an obligatory curriculum, or to discrimination based on whether they possess a certificate or a diploma.

      Choice.

    8. What counts is that education is assumed to be the result of an institutional process managed by the educator.

      Teacher, Sage on the Stage.

    9. The free-school movement
    10. Technology provides man with discretionary time he can fill either with making or with doing.

      Making vs. Doing seems like a false dichotomy here.

    11. Schools are based upon the equally spurious hypothesis that learning is the result of curricular teaching.

      I suspect this is his main thesis and argument.

    1. ivic engagement projects

      My wife just wrote about this for our local newspaper (as part of a partnership between our writing project and the local paper to raise teacher voices in public).

    2. your academic skills are being strengthened by the project.

    3. ust one lonely hand went up

    4. Elizabeth rarely gave stu-dents explicit guidance, but she didn’t remain silent either, instead re-peatedly tossing questions and challenges back to them.

      Just noting this important insight ...

    5. www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-lUrM-rmIE

      The beauty of annotation is that we can embed videos right here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-lUrM-rmIE

    6. students had discovered that a bill was under consideration in the Illinois State House of Representatives to end the automatic transfer from juvenile to adult courts. Now the kids were highly focused: How could they lobby legislators to pass the bill?

      Did teacher alert kids? Or were kids alert enough now to be following the news? Wondering about places where teachers intervene and where students take charge ....

    7. Which led to Elizabeth’s next question: “So how should we deal with the difference? How could we arrive at a consensus?”

      From a teaching perspective, this pivot point -- the question posed after the discussion -- is most important, and knowing when that moment is and what to ask is critical (and takes time and mistakes, perhaps)

    8. Steven Zemelman

      I interviewed Steve about his book at Middleweb

      Read When Student Inquiry Becomes Student Action

  14. Apr 2018
    1. Most learning is not the result of instruction. It is rather the result of unhampered participation in a meaningful setting

      Another connection to Connected Learning: production-centered. You do it to learn it.

    2. School teaches us that instruction produces learning.

      True.

    3. The school system today performs the threefold function common to powerful churches throughout history. It is simultaneously the repository of society's myth, the institutionalization of that myth's contradictions, and the locus of the ritual which reproduces and veils the disparities between myth and reality.

      Interesting ...

    4. Masters and students gathered to read the texts of other masters, now long dead, and the living words of the dead masters gave new perspective to the fallacies of the present day. The university was then a community of academic quest and endemic unrest

      Here's a connection to Connected Learning ... of being academically orientated and of reaching out to those with knowledge, no matter the geographic distance, to gain more understanding of issues. The mentor element of master/student is still important and maybe thriving more with video conferencing and skyping and even youtube.

    5. A degree always leaves its indelible price tag

      I know he does not mean this literally, but with one kid in college and another on the way, I only see this literally. The cost of college in the US is staggering, and a huge barrier that no politician in the US takes on.

    6. Connected Learning

    7. Schools create jobs for schoolteachers

      Hackles up now ... :) (of course, I have a biased view here, as a teacher)

    8. Pupils have never credited teachers for most of their learning.
    9. idiots

      Wow. Don't see this term anymore (thankfully), and feel startled to see it here.

    10. Everyone learns how to live outside school. We learn to speak, to think, to love, to feel, to play, to curse, to politick, andto work without interference from a teacher.

      Here is probably another connection to Connected Learning -- although I would still argue that a teacher's role is important. But, the "interest-powered" strand -- not the studying for the test -- is what can motivate learners. School has a role (sorry Ivan) but it is balanced with the interest and needs of the learner. And does not need to happen in school.

    11. I shall define "school" as the age-specific, teacher related process requiring full-time attendance at an obligatory curriculum.

      Lots in there ... lots of confined space ...

    12. Matching people according to their interest in a particular title is radically simple.

      But ... but ... can lead to echo chamber effect ... we only hear what we want to hear from people who think like us.

    13. Potential skill teachers are never scarce for long because, on the one hand, demand for a skill grows only with its performance within a community and, on the other, a man exercising a skill could also teach it. But, at present, those using skills which are in demand and do require a human teacher are discouraged from sharing these skills with others. This is done either by teachers who monopolize the licenses or by unions which protect their trade interests. Skill centers which would be judged by customers on their results, and not on the personnel they employ or the process they use, would open unsuspected working opportunities, frequently even for those who are now considered unemployable. Indeed, there is no reason why such skill centers should not be at the work place itself, with the employer and his work force supplying instruction as well as jobs to those who choose to use their educational credits in this way.

      I read this as vocational education? Is that right? I think our society -- here in US -- has devalued vocational training schools (my wife teaches at one), and I wish there was a better balance between the academic high schools and the vocational/tech high schools. And I wish there was more overlap between the two. Everyone needs more skills-based hands-on learning experiences (see: Maker Movement) and everyone needs challenging academic explorations.

    14. IVAN ILLICH
    15. There is currently a proposal on record which seems at first to make a great deal of sense. It has been prepared by Christopher Jencks of the Center for the Study of Public Policy and is sponsored by the Office of Economic Opportunity. It proposes to put educational "entitlements" or tuition grants into the hands of parents and students for expenditure in the schools of their choice.

      Early Betsy DeVos? I have found that School Choice here in my region happens at the detriment of the public schools, since money follows kids, leaving the urban schools struggling even more to keep up as white families move their kids to Charter Schools.

    16. Most learning happens casually, and even most intentional learning is not the result of programmed instruction.

      I wonder how the digital age has either enforced or altered this statement. Are kids learning more others in social networks and platforms? Places where teachers are not?

    17. A second major illusion on which the school system rests is that most learning is the result of teaching. Teaching, it is true, may contribute to certain kinds of learning under certain circumstances. But most people acquire most of their knowledge outside school

    18. In the United States it would take eighty billion dollars per year to provide what educators regard as equal treatment for all in grammar and high school.

      I wonder what this would be today?

    19. It is probably most intensely felt in U.S. cities. Nowhere else is poverty treated at greater cost. Nowhere else does the treatment of poverty produce so much dependence, anger, frustration, and further demands.

      I suspect this is still true today -- 40 years or so after this was written. That's depressing.

    1. These valuable experiences provided students withcritical skills and strategies to participate in civic and political dialogue paving the way for meaningful and productiveparticipation in the digital age.

      I'd be curious to know how the Youth Voices kids do as they go to college and beyond public school. Have they used those skills for activism, for further connections, for jobs? Another research project for another time ...

    2. youth may either minimize or withdraw their participation from online dialogue because of fears ofnegativity and conflict.

      Can we add privacy violations and data scraping to the list of why young people might be wary?

    3. posting reflections was more fitting than posting a final five-paragraph essay.

      And more authentic, too, I suspect.

    4. Youth Voices
    5. Whereas low-income youth are more likely to learn or practice basic skillscausing what Schradie called “the digital production gap.

      And testing. Lots and lots of testing. All year. That's too often how computer labs are utilized in many struggling districts -- to gather achievement data instead of teaching skills for communication. This was true years ago and still rings true today in too many schools.

    6. 2005

      13 years ago. Not sure this holds up.

    7. a significant number of respondentsrecommended withdrawing from the conversation rather than working toward productive dialogue.

      This is not a surprising finding, and yet, it's disheartening. I wonder if this is still true, two years later -- after the election that has divided the US. And do we want more withdrawal (giving us time to think and ponder our reaction to something) or less (engaging, but maybe engaging with diatribe)? This is all the heart of discussions about how we engage in discussions. I'm not sure of the answer ...

    8. echo chambers

    9. filter bubbles

    10. online dialogue can take place anytime, anywhere

      Including the margins ...

    11. Internet-fueled communication

      I'm looking at the date of this article --June 2016 -- and thinking, this term here seems almost quaint now, doesn't it? All of this has now been ramped to the extreme -- the flow of communication, good and ill -- has taken over our ability to curate and make sense of things.

    12. Dialogue

    1. (6&! T%0*%0! S

      More here Paulo Freire

    2. !"$!B%&B&202!$&!B($!0'()4$*&#46!\0#$*$60:0#$2\!&%!$(*$*&#!;%4#$2!*#$&!$.0!.4#'2!&<!B4%0#$2!4#'!2$('0#$2!<&%!0+B0#'*$(%0!*#!$.0!2).&&62!&<!$.0*%!).&*)0K!7().!*#'*J*'(46!0#$*$60:0#$2!)&(6'!*#'00'!50!4#!*:B&%$4#$!2$0B!*#!$.0!%*;.$!'*%0)$*&#K

      Early Betsy DeVoss? I have found that School Choice here in my region happens at the detriment of the public schools, since money follows kids, leaving the urban schools struggling even more to keep up as white families move their kids to Charter Schools.

    3. 1&2$!604%#*#;!.4BB0#2!)42(466/O!4#'!0J0#!:&2$!*#$0#$*&#46!604%#*#;!*2!#&$!$.0!%02(6$!&<!B%&;%4::0'!*#2$%()$*&#

      I wonder how the digital age has either enforced or altered this statement. Are kids learning more others in social networks and platforms? Places where teachers are not?

    4. !20)&#'!:4Z&%!*66(2*&#!&#!I.*).!$.0!2).&&6!2/2$0:!%02$2!*2!$.4$!:&2$!604%#*#;!*2!$.0!%02(6$!&<!$04).*#;K

    5. "#!$.0!L#*$0'!7$4$02!*$!I&(6'!$4S0!0*;.$/!5*66*&#!'&664%2!B0%!/04%!$&!B%&J*'0!I.4$!0'()4$&%2!%0;4%'!42!0P(46!$%04$:0#$!<&%!466!*#!;%4::4%!4#'!.*;.!2).&&6K!

      I wonder what this would be today?

    6. $!*2!B%&5456/!:&2$!*#$0#206/!<06$!*#!LK7K!)*$*02K!]&I.0%0!0620!*2!B&J0%$/!$%04$0'!4$!;%04$0%!)&2

      I suspect this is still true today -- 40 years or so after this was written. That's depressing.

  15. Mar 2018
    1. we call on English educa-tors, regardless of racial and ethnic backgrounds, to examine, critique, and interrupt the grave injustices that are routinely committed against Black youth.

      Their call to action ...

    2. (1) tools to heal: acknowledging that the wound exists and identifying its culprit, and (2) tools to transform: responding to the wound using a tool that works to transform the conditions that led to the wound

      Heal and Transform. Important and powerful.

    3. Black Twitter is a counterspace created by Black Twitter users within the Twitter social network that represents Black perspectives and provides a platform where Black users can control their images, produce counternarratives, express their opinions, voice their concerns, and locate more reliable news and information about the Black community.
    4. These distorted patterns of portrayals not only influence the public’s understandings and attitudes toward Black youth, but also on how these youth view themselves and their communities.

      I'm thinking of how Mueller's team accuses Russian operatives of using social media to stoke divisions in our country right along these lines -- the race divisions were already there but the operatives knew how magnifying these divisions on Facebook and Twitter through groups and fake protests and false news stories would further divide us. This does not let us off the hook. It does show the power of social media on many people's lives, however.

    5. It was rare to find media outlets that used photos of Brown with his family members or wearing a cap and gown from his high school graduation.

      Totally agree. The gangster narrative was an easy fit for the news media, and became a shallow tale of the victim, not the bigger story of the boy.

    6. Many of the headlines in the media described the killers as “quiet,” “smart,” “nice,” and “typical American Boy[s].” By contrast, Black people—suspects or not—are often not given these same considerations.

      Thinking of Parkland. Not sure if these general descriptions here hold true for that high school killer, who has regularly been described in media accounts as troubled, deranged, psychotic, sick, etc. Is the narrative changing?

    7. mainstream media

      Interesting that Trump and others on the Far Right are also attacking the Mainstream Media. Here, we have the attack from the Left. I'm not here to defend Media itself, as it can be biased and it can make mistakes, but as a former journalist, I wonder about the attacks on the center from the sides. And CNN fired Harry Houck for some of the very reasons this article addresses. https://www.mediamatters.org/blog/2018/02/23/harry-houck-who-used-cnn-position-push-racist-tropes-and-defend-police-brutality-out-network/219491 I guess my concern is that the broad brush of Mainstream Media is not all that helpful to me in my understanding. Reading on ...