927 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
  2. Feb 2020
    1. Engaging in fostering an enduring love for place reveals and expands spaces that allow people to be participants in an optimistic endeavor.

      Love this sentence .... it captures the heart of this piece, for me

      "Engaging in fostering an enduring love for place reveals and expands spaces that allow people to be participants in an optimistic endeavor."

    2. would

      Interesting, the verb tense here. It caught my attention that "would" is used instead of "will" and maybe that is due to the way the prompt has been framed. Would suggests maybe. Will suggests happening.

    3. Nick

      I love reading these kinds of student reflections, where they grasp the larger picture of the art they are creating, and the purpose for creating the art. Their journal writings can surface important thinking and learning.

    4. Grover Washington Jr.

      Groove ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90NiJ5WI9cU (adding some soundtrack to the margins)

    5. raise Song for the Day,
    6. Praisesongs

      Trying to learn more about Praisesongs as a concept

    7. Youth ex-amining their city across multiliteracies activities and lived experiences invite ways to reimagine details of their worlds; in turn, youth giving particular attention to meanings of space and place build new conceptualizations of futures of their city. New understandings of well-known locations emphasized by youth as important to nurture and critique are thus invited, and begin to form.

      This seems an important passage here, an anchor to the project

    8. We thought about who represents Detroit and how we represent ourselves as Detroit.

      Is this a nod to the power structure? Who has political capital and agency and who does not? The first step in enacting change is noticing the disparities ...

    9. composing their city

      This phrasing intrigues me, in how music and composition offers another way to view, and maybe appreciate -- or maybe be more critical, too -- of a place that is often to familiar to really notice anymore. I am thinking of how we give our students some creative distance from where they are, in order to see it anew. Maybe then, to make change.

    10. Verses

      Going off to listen to some tracks from Verses before coming back to read more

      https://soundcloud.com/user-586734206

    11. poem

      There is something powerful and inspiring that a kid of the city still loves the city, and not just does work to support other kids in the city, but writes a poem about it.

    12. White Stripes
    13. Third Man Records
  3. quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com
    1. songs of paradox

      Your lyrics

      stretch the known,

      into the unknown,

      this heliosphere,

      always our home

      until the time of disintegration

      when our songs get buried

      as bones

    2. obtuse orbits

      Acute orbits, too,

      the way my legs

      fold into you, my dear,

      the blankets tangled at our feet;

      for when we connect, we speak,

      complete

    3. sip from the sun

      By morning's first light,

      when the Earth's forever orbit

      brings us closer together,

      we sip from the sun,

      a drink of melted night

      brewed from falling stars and

      lost darkness

    4. History slips

      Margin notes

      fill the gaps;

      the pencil marks

      of students, past,

      grappling to ignore

      the printed page

      for beneath the gloss,

      the people rage

  4. Jan 2020
    1. I felt vulnerable negotiating and navigating the course with my students.

      I appreciate the honesty here ... I wonder if you received any pushback or interest from administrators or parents? Did you have to justify your shift? (I am thinking of schools where the curriculum is mandated a certain way and how to help us all take steps in the direction you are outlining here)

    2. students created an underground zine with poetry and prose

      Any of it online anywhere for viewing?

    3. stuffed copies of the zine into every sixth, seventh, and eighth grade locker

      Ha! Subversive distribution!

    4. At the conclusion of our mental health unit, students created posters that featured a wealth of strategies to reduce stress and anxiety. They hung the posters up in high-traffic areas of the hallway.

      Are these available for wider viewing anywhere?

    5. Next, we curated a list of potential documentaries, articles, and books that could inform our discourse.

      I'm curious about how this discovery and curation of related materials was done by students ....

    6. Some students expressed immediate enthusiasm, while others conveyed hesitancy.

      I can imagine both responses. We're teaching in a time of standardized testing, where our students/children are too often being taught that the right answer is the only answer, so freedom and flexibility feel strange to them. "Tell me what to do" is the underlying mantra. Opening up the classroom to student input and agency (thinking: Project-based Learning) creates excitement in some, and anxiety in others.

    7. My process of reflection and growth happened slowly over the next two years

      This is the power of time and inquiry, and room to reflect. I'm thinking of how hectic and harried a teacher's life can be, and how quickly we lose track of the most important moments. Writing can surface some of those events and give us a bit of breathing room to realistically examine our actions, and how we might make change for the future. (this writing space is what makes NWP sites so important, in my experience)

    8. nd I was responsible

      That's quite a dramatic moment, for sure ... when that realization hits ... it demonstrates the power that the teacher has over what students are exposed to ...

  5. Dec 2019
    1. In each of these examples, Miles Morales: Spider- Man acts as a counter to canon-ical texts to provide students with an opportunity to challenge assumptions about heroes, youth, and schooling experiences

      Scott Smoot -- Word Sanctuary blog -- wrote about his own experiences of using this book to transform his thinking in the classroom.

    2. DisruptTexts
    3. Pairings

      Very valuable to have these kinds of charts .. thank you

    4. #SayHerName

      sayhername, explained -- and the fact that I didn't know what it was says a lot about society (white society) at large, I think.

    5. Ava duvernay
    6. chool- to- prison pipeline
    7. Mr. Chamberlain talks about the Civil War “like this beautiful, romantic thing” and defends slavery as “kind of good for the country”

      Interesting contrast for me, as I am reading The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead, in which the teacher is the exact opposite of Mile's teacher.

      “The class was focused on US history since the Civil War, but at every opportunity Mr. Hill guided them to the present, linking what happened a hundred years ago to their current lives. They’d set off down one road at the beginning of class and it always led back to their doorsteps.”

      -- from The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead, page 30

    8. “there are other ways of thinking about time, there are other ways of thinking about place and community, what it means to win, be a hero, or save the world”

      Great quote ...

    9. some to fathom

      And often leads to trolls and others pushing back on the racebending initiatives with anger and vitriol -- Another example is Kamala Khan as Ms. Marvel --<br>

    10. Black and Latinx students are disproportionately punished within schools when they fail to succumb to those norms by teachers who have not critically examined their own cultural biases.

      Information from a study on this ... you have to go to pages 13-15 to see the charts ...

      Black male students represented 8 percent of enrolled students and accounted for 23 percent of students expelled. Black female students represented 8 percent of the student enrollment and accounted for 10 percent of students who were expelled. Latino male students accounted for 13 percent of students enrolled and 16 percent of students who were expelled. Latina female students accounted for 13 percent of student enrollment and 6 percent of students who were expelled.

    11. Miles Morales: Spider- Man
    12. Subsequently, teachers’ inability to challenge the status and content of the canon emboldens a hierarchy that places White char-acters learning about racism over characters of color experiencing racism.

      This is a good insight ....

    1. Afghanistan

      This was a great podcast from NYT: The Daily -- it starts with a report who was a front-line soldier during The Surge and ends with a reporter who wrote about the Afghanistan Papers

  6. Nov 2019
    1. Terry

      Some friends

      leave such words, threaded

      into the architecture

      of a shared humanity --

      an act of something

      beyond the self;

      Finding traces embedded

      here, now, then, there

      reminds us

      that tokens of kindness

      resonate farther

      than we can ever see

    1. White people have been damaged in becoming white, and this damage informs the ways white people move through the world. White people must be ready to work with that wreckage as we seek out better, more human ways to be in relationship to white supremacy.

      One on hand, this is a pretty bold assertion -- all white people is assumed in this sentence. Painting large brush strokes like that is always precarious. On the other, the second line is very poetic and attuned to the nature of change.

    2. The Whiteness Project

      Is this the project?

    3. You talk so white

      And if he talked "black"? What would have the reaction been then, I wonder? I appreciate the storytelling here, of bringing us into an important moment, and being confronted by a student (in a way that clearly has resonated over time).

    4. Storytelling is, perhaps, an acutely useful tool for disrupting those logics.
    5. we don’t work to better understand ourselves.

      I tried to highlight this entire sentence but the page break broke my highlighter -- this insight seems important to me in this context of race and identity (and ultimately, how teachers in the classroom can become more attuned to race and equity and access). So, this is a note to myself (and you, if it is helpful) to come back to this sentence as an anchor point.

    6. This behavior places the burden (and promise) of disrupting white supremacy solely on people of color

      Hmmm. I'm not sure this is true, actually. There are many others who push against white supremacy who are white, who are organized and active, who confront it. Maybe not enough. We all need to do more. But to claim that the force of disruption is only people of color seems to overgeneralize the real world.

    7. creates dev-astation and death for people of color

      This is a pretty strong and powerful, and provocative, way to frame this piece. I had to pause here. To think about this. For it is true, but is it true for everyone who is white? Everyone who is not? This is a signal that this piece will push to us examine our own identities.

    1. Updated

      Time

      passes, if you

      know what I mean -

      the words gather

      and possibly reconvene --

      maybe when we sleep

      the poem, dreams

    2. Here we are ... on the page There we are ... off the page An invite to write ... please do

    1. blink

      Moving my blinkblinkblink from Thimble to Glitch -- this project has jumped platforms more times than ... you can blink ... somehow, it still survives ...

  7. Oct 2019
    1. A Place for Local in Critical Global Literacies

      Amy joined Rich Novak and others for a video chat about the article ... this gives more context to the piece and the interactions here ... https://youtu.be/0faB6_8BrbM

    2. Things Fall Apart
    3. “Where I’m From,”
    4. AMY

      Thank you, Amy, for giving permission for us to annotate your article for Write Out.

    5. English teachers are uniquely positioned to help guide students’ understand-ing of the interconnectedness of the world and to think critically about their role in it.

      I agree ... the expanded notions of literacies open many doors for the English classroom to overlap with other curriculum areas more readily and more easily than the other way around (but that is not impossible, either, for the creative teacher).

    1. words

      I am stuck today with an overabundance of words. Multi-syllable symphonies strung together like nonsense. Shall I plant them as seeds to grow you a tree to sit under for dreaming? Do you need more? Dreams, I mean, not trees. But maybe that, too. Maybe all these ever are are just seeds for trees, trees for dreams. Listen. I am watering the soil. Wait for the poem, and it shall bloom and blossom and wither and fade. This is what my words always seem to do. Then I forget and do it all over again.

      One seed: https://play.soundslides.com/BL6JLBbd

    2. Spent

      When I wonder

      where it is

      I went, I realize

      that all I ever was

      was spent

    3. Ten

      nine

      eight

      seven

      six

      five

      four

      three

      two

      one

  8. Aug 2019
    1. The Anatomy of a Pitch

      Appreciate the practical turn here ...

    2. If you want to publish essays in popular periodicals, then you’ll need to become less possessive of your prose.

      barrier to many academic writers, for sure, who guard their words and ideas with barricades and language

    3. hook

    4. if you want to publish more public-facing pieces, then you need to pitch more often

      or set up a system where more writers of color and gender and viewpoints are invited to the pages ... and do academic institutions value this 'public facing writing' or do they devalue it?

    5. Either way, you are increasingly responsible for building your own audience for your research. Shrug that off at your own risk.

      THIS point seems important to the academic world -- of the role of the writer to build,find,nurture an audience -- to carve out a role for original ideas -- I think more and more fiction writers are doing this, with some success (and some, not so successful, and others, aghast at the role of the writer in the social media age)

    6. You’re pointing the way forward.

      always ...

    7. Adult Children

    8. Why was so little Austen scholarship humorous?
    9. Jane Austen Society of North America’s Annual General Meeting.

      eh, narrow space for sure ...

    10. “But it was featured on the front page of The New York Times!” I said. “Exactly!” he replied, as if that fact better supported his point about its insubstantiality, rather than mine about its significance.

      Huh. Interesting conflict here ...

    1. We have to start where we live and where we work. This is one of the places I live and work

      Ah, yes. Love this phrasing ...

  9. Jul 2019
  10. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. coaching toward imperfection

      interesting phrasing .. I like it .... certainly striving for the "imperfect" is not often what we hear in educational circles, is it? This is the other side of the coin of the standardized testing era we are in -- and also, the more true way of seeing learning as a process forward ...

    2. designing for “connection”

    3. https://www.youtube.com/embed/j1loyk2U6yU?rel=0
    4. open as a design ideology is necessary but not sufficient in providing conditions for transformative professional learning

      Important insight ... which points to some of the weaknesses in the whole MOOC wave that has sort of fallen apart because open was never enough for transformative practice ... I think ....

    5. CLMOOC
  11. Jun 2019
  12. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. 312

      Curious if there are thoughts by facilitators (or the authors of the study) to setting an open document for folks to add annotations and resources to, if they have some of their own? Just wondering how to put Connected Learning into action, here, as an extension of annotation on Connected Learning.

    2. practices that welcomed cMOOC newcomers to the cMOOC space

      This is so important ... it's crucial that new folks feel not just welcomed but invited to participate or to just observe ... this requires diligence on the part of facilitators ...

    3. Connected learning

    4. The goal for this annotated bibliography is to provide an overview of connected learning theory and research that is most relevant to teaching and learning in K-16+ school settings, which can serve as a resource for those interested in connected learning practice and outcomes

      This kind of curated work is important -- particularly in the kinds of spaces where information can get lost. There are lots of great ideas and resources but they seem to be all over the place, sometimes scattered, loosely connected. Perhaps more of this kind of weaving will help others see the possibilities of a Connected Learning underpinning.

  13. citejournal.s3.amazonaws.com citejournal.s3.amazonaws.com
    1. n this model, learning is of primary importance –not the tools.

      Nicely articulated ... I guess we can't say this enough ... I am thinking here of Audrey Watters' work around how the technology industry has long influenced the educational systems in order to sell more stuff to schools, and how those relationships at the top have filtered down into the classroom -- so, more high-end technology seems to equate to deeper learning, and we know (right?) that is not true.

    2. experiment

      Experiment=Play

    3. magic will ensue

      as if ...

    1. Digital badges are micro-credentials thatcontain data about the specific skills gainedwhen earning the badg

      I'm still pretty mixed on the value of digital badges. I have yet to be convinced that they mean anything in the long run ... can someone convince me otherwise?

    2. Leverage technology to help amplifyand disseminate youth voi

      Definitely helpful to use technology to spread the learning, but there are also other ways -- newspapers, fliers, forums, etc. https://letters2president.org/

    3. How can youactivate your networks in service of youryouth?

      I've seen this happen and been one asking for help via networks -- either through classroom connections or through adult mentors or through gathering resources. Leveraging networks can be powerful.

    4. peers and adults

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNcet150S5A&list=PLB494592AA0A4AE1F&index=5&t=0s

      This is where the technology might play a role -- making it easier to make connections with mentors who live elsewhere ... global connections ...

    5. youth are motivated to continue learning
  14. May 2019
    1. So what do you think?

      Thanks for sharing ... this does sound like CLMOOC to me ...

    2. pretty

      pretty but not too pretty ... there's always a sense of "draft" in the work of the community ... I think it's important to articulate that most of CLMOOC is always "in process" and the reflection element is key to the experience, not the finished products ... I'm not sure if I am articulating what I am thinking ... It's a compliment to say CLMOOC always has some rough edges ...

    3. Communicative conversations

      I'm glad this element is surfacing ... sometimes, I feel like I get so wrapped up in the fun and creative work that I lose track of the meta-thinking of it all ... and how it might play out for students in classrooms (which is one of the aims of CLMOOC -- get educators into the field of play so they bring their students into the field of play).

    4. I can never remember the actual title of my thesis

      CLMOOC Name the Thesis Contest ....

    5. 40K tweets

      Wow .... that's a lot of stuff ...

    6. CLMOOC

      Word Cloud from these words

    7. emergent and thus unplanned

      The "planning for the unexpected" is the best part of the CLMOOC experience (at least for me), and the most difficult, and requires facilitators to be ready to highlight an unexpected thread of conversation or creativity, and go with it, supporting both the initial spark and the map that suddenly appears.

    8. creative playfulness

      here is a key phrase, I think. If it's not playful, people won't engage. And if it's not creative, they won't continue. The first year of CLMOOC, this was a key conversation because we knew teachers in summer wanted to do something different, something fun, something interesting. All of the Make Cycles were designed with this in mind (in hopes that this ethos would then shift into classroom experiences later on for students)

  15. Apr 2019
    1. doing the same thing

      network of networks

    2. Chicago has more than 200 different youth serving organizations offering various forms of volunteer-based tutoring and/or mentoring in non-school hours.

      And as you often note, you use Chicago because that's where you are and where your work is situated ... but many places have networks and organizations that people can tap into ... it takes some looking. Or it takes creating those networks yourself for others to find.

    3. I think this is one of the major problems facing the world. Too much information. Too few using it.

      Yep, and we have yet to reach a place where these things are balanced out. It's a struggle, for attention, for action, for connecting to our neighborhoods, to others.

    1. These examples demonstrate Kara’s efforts to help her students critically examine place and see themselves as actors in creating a “consequential geography” (Soja, 2010, p. 1), particularly of the spaces they call home.

      This seems most important ....

    2. Kara also required her students to explore food options available in a one-mile radius around their school to determine whether they were part of a food desert

      Maybe she did this but it would be neat to see this as a map ... maybe even a layered map, with student narratives overlayed on top (like with ThingLink or something)

    3. Urban spaces, for example, are dense ecologies with complex networks of materials (both “natural” and human-made) and histories of race, class, and power dynamics (e.g., changing neighborhood demographics, systemic housing discrimination).

      and maybe history is another layer in this dense geography -- what has happened before echoing (for good or for not) into what is happening now in any given space ...

  16. quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com
    1. I'd rather be a tall, ugly weed

    2. "Drop a Mouse into Poetry"
    3. learned to breathe fresh air

      Fresh air; breathing -

      seemingly uncaring, deepening

      the world, packed full of sharing,

      pairing up city rhymes to street rhythms

      in a line of ideas - go on and fill 'em -

      feel 'em, they're all about the scaring you -

      white 'burbs with earbuds dangling -

      regaling you with words you've never heard,

      the air fresh, from the breathing:

      this is the season for believing in the poem

    4. Funny it seems, but by keeping it's dreams

      I am a sucker for internal rhymes. Although these lyrics (for me) don't always hold up as a poem on its own, the art of internal rhyme to create rhythm against the backdrop of bass and drums is a key element of HipHop that I greatly admire. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfgR2bEjAFg

    5. concrete
    6. I'd rather be unseen

      Making a choice? Or maybe not ...

    7. the abyss of the bizarre

      This is where

      we go when we

      have no other place

      to take us

    8. wind-wavering

      Not just alliteration here, but also evocative of standing on the cliff, looking out ....

  17. Mar 2019
    1. Indigenous Peoples Day

      In the neighboring town, middle school students pushed and argued for this change, which has had some ripple effect in our communities. read more

    1. The online affinity network of Ravelry, and opportunities for online distribution and sales, vastly expanded Amy’sability to pursue a specialized interest, develop expertise, and connect this interest

      While my gut reaction is not to monetize learning, this viewpoint of mine seems naive when you take a larger look at why people do what they do, and why finding economic success with creative endeavors is important.

    2. Her passion for the fiber arts has even sparked a similar interest in her parents. Her mother has started to crochet,and her father has picked up knitting.

      I find this interesting -- that the child's interest sparks the interest of the parents. I'd love to hear their story about what they saw unfolding with Amy and Ravelry.

    1. I started seeing myself as a strong Black male, and smart. My mind started thinkin’ I’m someone makin’ a difference.

      This is powerful insight.

    2. counter images that falsely portray their intellec-tual abilities, academic acuity, cultural competencies, and sociohistorical realities.

      I am thinking of how the recent trend in adolescent literature is finally doing some of this -- showing us the lives and thoughts of people from diverse backgrounds and experiences, and how valuable that is for understanding each other. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-huIZghog8o

    3. Out here, I don’t worry ’bout that

      Such a stark contrast between sense of identity inside the school vs outside in the community/world. How do we as teachers find a way to bring those worlds together in meaningful ways? This is what we need to be considering ... (as we are, here, and elsewhere). His voice here is a powerful reminder of that.

    1. it is unlikely that she would have found a critical mass of knitters who are also Harry Potter fans

      This is the narrow element -- of finding others with your niche interest -- that makes online Affinity Networks potentially so powerful. It is also empowering to find others of your tribe when you didn't even know your tribe existed.

    2. Ravelry

      This is now the third or fourth reference to Ravelry that I have come across in the past month in terms of spaces that are incredibly supportive as Affinity Spaces for all newcomers and mentors. It's been referenced in Networked Narratives, and in DS106, and now here. I wonder what attributes Ravelry has that make it such a powerful experience for so many? And is it replicable?

    3. knitters

    4. Harry Potter

    5. Introduction

      Start annotation here ...

    6. This is a way to annotate part of the book for CLMOOC book club. Go down about halfway and a first section is shared here.

  18. Feb 2019
    1. We focus on how their engagements in nonschool, community-based, social justice initiatives represent strategic attempts to resist and counter deficit narratives or ideologies

      Connected Learning connections?

    2. rown v. Board of Education dec

    3. We agree with Mann’s and Gonzalez’s beliefs about public education and the need to provide opportunities for people to actively participate in a democratic, multiracial, and multiethnic society.

      I agree, too. I wonder how the Charter School debate plays out in this, though. Charter Schools are public schools, but they exist off to the side. Do they also contribute to the greater good? The ethics of what happens to existing public schools as Charter Schools siphon off resources is a real debate.

  19. Jan 2019
    1. Wenger’s (1998) useful concept of constellations of communities of practice is important for understanding the significance of belonging, shared identity, and learning about matters of practice that teachers self-identify as necessary to their ongoing development.

      Important concepts. Also, in online places, we often refer to the idea of Affinity Spaces, which has similar resonance. From Gee's work: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affinity_space

    2. ocial justice teaching

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B29PLiltESs Social Justice is at the heart of our mission statement for the Western Massachusetts Writing Project -- all programs designed through WMWP must reflect our mission statement. This all comes out of work done years ago with NWP's Project Outreach, whose resonance continues at our site today.

    1. value

      What's your take on his work?

    2. Alchemy

      How has the word and term "Alchemy" been misused over the years? Anything come to mind?

    3. can art supersede the craftwork of God?

      Whoah. Whatever your spiritual leanings (if any), this is an interesting query, right? I imagine the debates sparked by this must have been fierce.

    4. Newton’s alchemical manuscripts include a rich and diverse set of document types, including laboratory notebooks,

    5. chymistry

      Interesting spelling and word ...

    6. a lot of people just watching and trying to figure out what’s going on.

      I wonder if this is due to the need to belief in the unknown -- which is always something that has stirred the creative spirit in a lot of people.

    7. I taught the History of Science

      Hi John I am curious about how one leaps from history of science into digital learning -- I can see a path but wonder about you found it (or maybe, how you created that path).

    1. I'll look forward to connecting with you.

      I hope more people take you up on your offer ...

    2. These data resources are not profit centers. Thus, they don't qualify for investment zone capital.

      Conundrum ...

    3. they are part of the mix of youth and family support organizations needed to help bring a neighborhood out of deep poverty

    4. to identify places where people need help,

      So important ...

    1. narratives

      This tree has a story to tell

      its white leaves memory

      its roots dug deep underground

      its song a silent reminder

      of the connected soil

    2. imaginings

      Imagining

      things, again

      things I can't see

      things I only wonder about

      when snow covers all still to born

    1. dark ink

      What it is about dark ink? Gel pens -- those light pink and yellow and green ink things that my students love to use for the color and the sparkle-- will be the death of my old eyes. I want dark on light. Words etched into stone. Thick black sharpies leaving trails on white walls.

    2. spine of a dead tree

      Where we walk

      among the brambles

      where dead bugs

      tell no tales

      the spine of this dead

      tree never fails

      to intrigue me.

    3. Innotation

      I like this examination of both inside the text (and with the text) and outside the text (alongside the text). Both have value but both are different. In one (innotation), I am writing WITH you. In the other (annotation), I am writing BESIDE you. Where does one merge into the other?

    1. ontological

      Ontological:

      I don't know this word. Or at least, not enough to automatically recall its meaning. That happens sometimes, where a word has some faint echoes -- like, maybe you looked this one up before but only now remember that you once looked it up -- and yet, you can't draw the lines. So, I looked it up. The definition (below) is more confusing than the word. So here is where I pause, stop and think: this word is my hurdle to understanding, and the flow of my reading has come to a stop. I think I might just hop/skip/jump over it, then. I am the master of this distraction.

      from Wikipedia:

      Ontology is the philosophical study of being. More broadly, it studies concepts that directly relate to being, in particular becoming, existence, reality, as well as the basic categories of being and their relations.[1] Traditionally listed as a part of the major branch of philosophy known as metaphysics, ontology often deals with questions concerning what entities exist or may be said to exist and how such entities may be grouped, related within a hierarchy, and subdivided according to similarities and differences.

    2. perspective

      Take a moment to wander outside, and kneel down, into the grass and soil, and look closer. Give yourself some perspective on this world. What you see is the micro of our place. It's interesting to do this now and then to remind us that we are not the only creatures and living things inhabiting this space, that other worlds turn inside of ours. We just never notice. Take a moment to notice, won't you?

    3. crash

      I have a friend, who works at the Wall Street Journal, who texts me and my friends regularly about the coming economic crash. I have trouble telling if he is overreacting to the political events of the day (he is a fine conspiracy theory activist) or is right in tune. I, too, am wary of where the economy is going and while numbers suggest some stability, it all feels false. Too many people still struggling. Too many Wall Street companies getting rich quick. If the crash is coming, is anyone ready?

    4. researcher

      I like to think that all of us are researchers, to some degree. In the various regular writing I do -- looking at the small moments with SmallStories, for example -- I think of this as research, of examining the world. Researchers notice things. They put a larger frame around what they see. They write to understand it. Even if it is only you, stopping a moment to see something you might otherwise pass by, that's some kind of research. It won't get you that PHD, but it will give you pause. And pausing is something, too.

    5. dependent

      We're in a sort of strange time here in our house. Two of three boys don't really live here -- they are in college -- and the third boy, 14, is both blessed and curses by all of our attention now. We do joke about this, a lot. Even he joins in. Still, I am sympathetic towards him and yet, feeling a bit nostalgic for the crazy, hectic days of three kids in the house, and I even appreciate (now, later) the chaos of it all. This is life, though, and another chapter. At least we have the baby, 14, for a few more years.

    6. Anna -- I am reading your rewriting and finding key words for small essays in the margins. Kevin

    7. writing

      How is it that writing became so important to me? I'm thinking back, trying to remember any one single event or teacher that hooked me into it. I only draw blank. Perhaps it was my mother's love of books, and my own love of libraries and books as a child, that led me to understand the power of story and writing. I don't remember loving writing in school, at any grade, although a few classes here and there in college -- mostly, electives -- gave me more freedom to write in different genres, and that opened the door a bit. I'd like to think that, as a teacher, I can inspire some of my students to become life-long writers, but maybe that is just the hope of teachers everywhere. And who knows if it comes true?

    8. anticipate

      At teacher lunches, we often talk about our students, and a common refrain over the years has been a lack of patience and perseverance by young people. Our students don't want to mull over something or to dig deeper, the criticism goes. They want the answer now. Many of my colleagues blame video games and technology on this decreasing attention, and it may be true, but I often find myself resisting this blame game, and I wonder about how it is we are teaching and what learning looks like to our students. It does no good to cast blame on the kids in front of us if we aren't reflecting and changing what we're doing to ensure we meet their needs.

    9. blue car

      My mom had a blue car -- a blue Grenada, if I remember right. It looked like a police car, if the blue of a police car had been lightened by a spray paint can. I remember driving her car -- it was a standard -- to high school parties in woods and sometimes, people would scatter, thinking the police were arriving to break up the party. Only to discover me, in my mom's blue Grenada.

    10. orientation

      I stop and think of a compass. The way north always seems to pull us forward into some unknown space. people follow a compass rather blindly, don't we? We expect it to work. Same with GPS. We expect it to work and walk with faith that north is where we'll end up. Sometimes, we get lost.

  20. Dec 2018
    1. We are allwriters
    2. spoken word poetry
    3. The youth will lead the revolution.

    4. multiple genres

    5. ee themselves as writers

    6. The work that we do in Writing Our Lives can serve as a site of healing and for resisting and working against violence.

    7. Parents and community members understood writing to be the timed writing tasks for standardized exams or the demonstration of the conventions of writing on school assignments,

    8. here was, however, deep frustration with the current state of education for African American children by several community members and parents, including me

    9. mentors

    10. I define radical youth literacies as ways of knowing, doing, writing, and speaking by youth who are ready to change the world

    11. From his bedroom to his neighborhood streets, he wrote and composed music lyrics, uploaded audio files, and directed music videos.

    12. Writing Our Lives

  21. Nov 2018
    1. In classrooms, testimony to experience is always present, whether explicitly invited or authorized, as the bodies of teachers and students tell stories of connection, disconnection, care, dismissal, belonging, and exclusion.

      This seems like a real anchor point of the piece for me ... how to ensure our classrooms are spaces where this kind of sharing and understanding, and compassion and empathy, might happen.

    2. Hurricane Katrina was a natural disaster felt by a nation through the images and stories in the media.

      And later, through deeper narratives

  22. Oct 2018
    1. t is the oppressive and symbolically violent use of the essentials of our discipline—words, rhetoric, and modes of communica-tion—that sticks to us most in the ongoing aftermath of the election

      Words matter.

    2. we also recognize that some readers did

      Good to acknowledge this. The votes didn't come out of nowhere. They came from within various communities, and communities of practice.

    3. I am struggling with how to teach today and the next few days.

      This sounds like something I said to my wife. And she said to me. And we all said to each other.

    1. There must be a better system, and I would have hoped that bright minds in Washington, D.C., could sit down and work out a solution that takes into account all of the concerns that have been raised.

      All the more reason that voting is important -- they are our elected officials.

    1. Lina Mounzer

      Thank you for this piece. For its power and beauty and insights and experience.

    2. Language gives the individual the power and strength of the collective. And writing, speaking, telling stories—wielding language in narrative form—has the ability to transform the collective through the individual experience.

      This is the center of the whole piece, to me.

    3. Who is the reader I’m addressing

      We are the readers ...

    4. there is no real resolution to the trauma of the collective. It lives on in all the stories you will ever tell from now on, in all the stories that will be passed down along the line of culture, even when they are about something else.

      Interesting insights ... writing about many lingers longer than writing about one person.

    5. Trying to rewrite my past in an effort to not have to translate it.

      The writer pivots here, to self.

    6. these I’s bump up into one another again and again until they are accidentally shattered, the various pieces of these commingled selves becoming, for long moments, indistinguishable from one another.

      (found poem from text)

      from you

      comes I

      for I have

      become you;

      these words

      now of us

      co-mingle,

      indistinguishable

      in these long moments

      where we both emerge

      accidentally shattered

      by story.

  23. Sep 2018
    1. And two contradictory things become true at once: that despite the fact I am attempting to reproduce her words as faithfully as I can, they must now re-emerge in words unavoidably my own.

      Here is the contradiction of the translator, I suppose.

    2. they are constantly traversing borders both visible and invisible

    3. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut

      Wait.

      So the stories above are not her stories ... she is translating and then writing of their experiences. Ok. Some sort of formatting should have made that more obvious to the reader. (Is that just me who feels this way?)

      I get this was a literary approach, and now I see the rest of the piece unfolds from a writer as translator, affected by the stories of the women bloggers.

      I think what I mean is, by annotating as I was reading, I felt as if I were with her -- now, a composite her -- speaking to her in the margins (along with all of you) -- and realizing the writer was removed, and only telling the stories of others, makes me want to go back and edit my remarks. I won't.

      But I never had that feeling before with annotation activities.

      Interesting ....

      Reading on ....

    4. Fatma

      I looked up the meaning of the name. Fatma. From this site:

      ... a girls' name is of Arabic derivation, and the meaning of the name Fatma is "baby's nurse". Fatma is a variant form of Fatima (Arabic): also possibly "one who abstains".

      I am thinking of that second meaning -- "one who abstains" -- and thinking of war and the powerless nature of those caught up in the war. Abstain from the chaos was not a choice Fatma or her mother (the writer) or the father had here.

    1. Bourdieu and Passeronmay not refer to Freire by name, but they condemn all such “populistpedagogies” as misguided.

      Interesting ...

    2. “banking” system of education in which teachers pour knowledge into the supposedly empty brains of their students.

    3. School

      Why capitalized? Wondering about the context here ....