812 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Black males already have voice, so English educators cannot give them voice

      YES.

    2. Metaphors We Live By

      I loved reading this book. I read this book during my Red Cedar Writing Project Summer Institute, in 2005. It is not a stretch to say that it absolutely changed the way I saw the world. It was the lens through which I considered everything.

    3. He at-tended all 20 hours of the video-recorded classroom sessions. Plus, he and I had three intensive interviews (193 minutes) across Phases I and II. Each interview was audio-recorded, and later transcribed and coded for themes. In Phase II, I spent an academic year working with Shawn beyond We Choose to Learn (his senior year in high school) to trace the consequences of his metaphor. I visited Shawn’s school, Urbantown High School, which afforded me opportu-nities to meet some of Shawn’s teachers, administrators, and friends, as well as students he mentored. I also collected data in the form of a follow-up interview, observations, field notes, and reflective memos. Informed by multiple sources of data acrossacademic spaces (We Choose to Learn and Urbantown High School), over time(July 2013 to June 2014), I triangulated the data to enhance its rigor and complexity. Triangulation allowed me to authentically center Shawn as a writer and focus on his writing development with metaphor.

      This is SO. MUCH. DATA. Incredible research described here!

    4. I realized he helped me to see differently

      This is the best when it happens <3

    5. Appendix B

      Should we crowdsource links to the readings included in Appendix B?

    6. Researching and teaching metaphor

      I am connecting to this due to my background in Educational Technology teaching and research: the metaphors we use when discussing technology can be really instructive and fruitful, and there is a whole thread of Ed Tech research that involves metaphor.

      All of that to say: metaphors aren't just an "English" thing and I completely agree they are much more than a literary device.

    7. Consequential writing is writing that is intentionally developed by, for, and with communities. It concurrently cultivates both academic and critical literacies of historically marginalized communities in a way that encourages justice-oriented action, which ensures that community members actively shape community goals.

      Consequential Writing:

      • developed by communities
      • developed for communities
      • developed with communities
      • encourages justice-oriented action
      • community members actively shape community goals

      (I had to slow this down for myself to get a sense of it before I could go on. This term is new to me.)

    8. transferability (Bhattacharya, 2017; Steinberg & Cannella, 2012)

      For more on this notion, this website had a good overview:[(https://socialresearchmethods.net/kb/qualitative-validity/)] "Transferability refers to the degree to which the results of qualitative research can be generalized or transferred to other contexts or settings. From a qualitative perspective transferability is primarily the responsibility of the one doing the generalizing. The qualitative researcher can enhance transferability by doing a thorough job of describing the research context and the assumptions that were central to the research. The person who wishes to “transfer” the results to a different context is then responsible for making the judgment of how sensible the transfer is."

    9. Literacies are so dynamic, and they are difficult to capture on standardized exams.

      YES.

    10. Tuck called for research that reimagines how findings might be used by, for, and with communities.

      This reminds me of the shift from discussing the 'achievement gap' to the 'opportunity gap.' I wonder how this phrase meets the standards that Tuck is laying out for us here? For more: click here [(https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2019/09/09/achievement-gap-opportunity-education-schools-students-teachers)]

    11. It felt as if the school put more money into our security system than into our educa-tion.

      This resonates with me. I remember feeling this way about the school in which I taught as an early career teacher.

    1. Engaging in fostering an enduring love for place reveals and expands spaces that allow people to be participants in an optimistic endeavor.

      Love this sentence .... it captures the heart of this piece, for me

      "Engaging in fostering an enduring love for place reveals and expands spaces that allow people to be participants in an optimistic endeavor."

    2. would

      Interesting, the verb tense here. It caught my attention that "would" is used instead of "will" and maybe that is due to the way the prompt has been framed. Would suggests maybe. Will suggests happening.

    3. Nick

      I love reading these kinds of student reflections, where they grasp the larger picture of the art they are creating, and the purpose for creating the art. Their journal writings can surface important thinking and learning.

    4. Grover Washington Jr.

      Groove ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90NiJ5WI9cU (adding some soundtrack to the margins)

  2. Feb 2020
    1. Filipiak

      More from Danielle is published at the NWP The Current. She also curated this collection Textual Power on Our Own Terms: Remixing Literacy in Out-of-School Spaces

    2. raise Song for the Day,
    3. Praisesongs

      Trying to learn more about Praisesongs as a concept

    4. Youth ex-amining their city across multiliteracies activities and lived experiences invite ways to reimagine details of their worlds; in turn, youth giving particular attention to meanings of space and place build new conceptualizations of futures of their city. New understandings of well-known locations emphasized by youth as important to nurture and critique are thus invited, and begin to form.

      This seems an important passage here, an anchor to the project

    5. We thought about who represents Detroit and how we represent ourselves as Detroit.

      Is this a nod to the power structure? Who has political capital and agency and who does not? The first step in enacting change is noticing the disparities ...

    6. composing their city

      This phrasing intrigues me, in how music and composition offers another way to view, and maybe appreciate -- or maybe be more critical, too -- of a place that is often to familiar to really notice anymore. I am thinking of how we give our students some creative distance from where they are, in order to see it anew. Maybe then, to make change.

    7. Verses

      Going off to listen to some tracks from Verses before coming back to read more

      https://soundcloud.com/user-586734206

    8. poem

      There is something powerful and inspiring that a kid of the city still loves the city, and not just does work to support other kids in the city, but writes a poem about it.

    9. White Stripes
    10. Third Man Records
    11. Praisesongs as a performance genre involve what Arntson (2008) described as “instrumental performance, singing, and speech” (p. 30). As Arntson (2008) explained, a “typical performance” (p. 30) of a praisesong involves a “verbal text and the musical patterns performed . . . equally capable of calling to mind a larger text, a shared area of knowledge, or a storyline . . . [involving] actions, events, attributes, and social mores” (p. 31).

      New genres as forms of composition have the potential to recast the writing we ask youth to do in academic spaces. Many new forms are digital, this seems to privilege paper, pencil and music instruments as part of social writing aided by teaching artists.

    12. Examining multiliteracies of youth of color

      This phrasing is so vital because of the way it focuses on the assets of youth. Schools can do a way better job of identifying the strengths of writers by asserting at the outset that they have many strengths.

    13. Multiliteracies Activities as Varied Notions of Spaces and Places

      There is resonance for me here with a previous #marginalsyllabus reading from 2019 titled "Cultivating Urban Literacies on Chicago’s South Side through a Pedagogy of Spatial Justice," by Andrea Vaughan, Rebecca Woodard, Nathan C. Phillips, and Kara Taylor.

      https://educatorinnovator.org/learn-with-marginal-syllabus-april-cultivating-urban-literacies-on-chicagos-south-side-through-a-pedagogy-of-spatial-justice/

    14. This generative naming situates youth as inscribing new meanings of themselves and peers as contributors broadening the possibilities of their city.

      I love the active and creative possibilities in this naming.

    15. galvanizes collective action emphasizing reciprocity as relational

      This focus on relationships in multiliteracy work feels so important. Where are some other places we see these connections being fostered?

    16. In our focus on praisesongs, we addi-tionally extend meanings of Diaspora literacy, and build pointedly on intentional naming by authors of color of praisesongs in contemporary literature

      Important connection back to previous #marginalsyllabus conversations about reimagining literary canons.

    17. Our inquiry of youth of color constructing meanings of spaces and places by composing tributes to their city illustrates how youth enacting multiliteracies envi-sion strengths in their communities.

      Strikes me as similar to taking an appreciative inquiry stance in teacher inquiry.

    18. engaged and complicated notions of spaces and places, and in what ways youth named spaces and places as significant within and across contexts important to them.

      I love these questions as they really honor youth experience and perspective.

  3. Jan 2020
    1. Vaughn W. M. Watson Michigan State UniversityAlecia Beymer Michigan State University

      Our thanks to partner authors Vaughn W. M. Watson and Alecia Beymer for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! Brief bios for each partner author are included at the end of the article

    2. Praisesongs of Place

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our February conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

    1. Te a c h i n g for social justice, however, aims to create spaces of inquiry that embody the progress we desire in society.

      Thank you for so eloquently and simply stating this. I think that your distillation of what teaching for social justice means to you might push others to identify the values that are important to them in relation to to SJE. And what a great job you have done at honoring those values in your teaching.

    2. Once a group was ready to film, the entire class would convene to help them record and produce their video

      I love the community and the collaboration here. It is a brilliant way to leverage the collective while also encouraging the individual.

    3. Furthermore, the students had the power to conclude a unit once they felt that they had sufficiently addressed their inquiries

      I am curious as to how this was navigated as a group. What if some students were ready to call it quits whereas others were wanting to go further.

    4. Here are ways to reach author Alex Corbitt:

      Twitter: https://twitter.com/alex_corbitt?lang=en

      Website: https://www.alexcorbitt.com/

    5. he group collaboratively agreed to establish a “safety protocol” in which we immediately pause a discussion and play a lighthearted team-building game. Anyone in the class could initiate the safety protocol if they felt overwhelmed with the content of the course

      Back to design ideas (per my last annotation); what occurs to me here is that because the author focused on procedures first, there was room for the students to ideate as well on the procedures that served them and their needs. This goes hand in hand with designing for developing a community of curiosity and care (and also makes me connect back to Nonviolent Communication)

    6. began the course with a series of procedures.

      I love this. It might be that the idea here is rather than start with the curriculum/assessment (via UbD); you are rather designing using a Design Thinking frame which emphasizes observation and empathy as the first step. After all, we are a community of learners, not teachers of standards.

    7. I felt vulnerable negotiating and navigating the course with my students.

      I appreciate the honesty here ... I wonder if you received any pushback or interest from administrators or parents? Did you have to justify your shift? (I am thinking of schools where the curriculum is mandated a certain way and how to help us all take steps in the direction you are outlining here)

    8. students created an underground zine with poetry and prose

      Any of it online anywhere for viewing?

    9. stuffed copies of the zine into every sixth, seventh, and eighth grade locker

      Ha! Subversive distribution!

    10. At the conclusion of our mental health unit, students created posters that featured a wealth of strategies to reduce stress and anxiety. They hung the posters up in high-traffic areas of the hallway.

      Are these available for wider viewing anywhere?

    11. Next, we curated a list of potential documentaries, articles, and books that could inform our discourse.

      I'm curious about how this discovery and curation of related materials was done by students ....

    12. Some students expressed immediate enthusiasm, while others conveyed hesitancy.

      I can imagine both responses. We're teaching in a time of standardized testing, where our students/children are too often being taught that the right answer is the only answer, so freedom and flexibility feel strange to them. "Tell me what to do" is the underlying mantra. Opening up the classroom to student input and agency (thinking: Project-based Learning) creates excitement in some, and anxiety in others.

    13. My process of reflection and growth happened slowly over the next two years

      This is the power of time and inquiry, and room to reflect. I'm thinking of how hectic and harried a teacher's life can be, and how quickly we lose track of the most important moments. Writing can surface some of those events and give us a bit of breathing room to realistically examine our actions, and how we might make change for the future. (this writing space is what makes NWP sites so important, in my experience)

    14. nd I was responsible

      That's quite a dramatic moment, for sure ... when that realization hits ... it demonstrates the power that the teacher has over what students are exposed to ...

    15. For the next two weeks we discussed ways to create spaces for students to express their voices and identities in the classroom

      This is such important time. I am struck by the focus here on working together as educators to think through how to support what youth need in the classroom in relation to what is happening in the wider society.

    16. My students showed me that activism addresses so many other issues, too

      I appreciate the ways Alex highlights the ways he learns from his students.

    17. I wanted to be proud of my Mistakes and Challenges unit. It seemed to have all the elements of good instruction: culturally relevant texts, deep essential

      This is powerful to me. I appreciate Alex's storytelling and reflection here. His discontent with his own teaching is an epiphany that carries with it a lot of vulnerability. I love how it becomes a springboard for more flexible, responsive approaches.

      It helps me reflect on my own teaching: What are all they times I've wanted to be proud of my instruction but something about the dynamics of it seemed off? As a designer of instruction in my own classroom, what are some times where the inequity of a situation struck me and prompted me to change, even though I had checked many boxes of the elements of good instruction?

    18. Revising Resistance: A Step Toward Student-Centered Activism

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    19. alexcorbitt

      Our thanks to partner author Alex Corbitt for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! To learn more about Alex visit: https://www.alexcorbitt.com/

    20. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    21. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our January conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

    1. What I am trying to suggest to you is that it was not an accident, it was not an act of God, it was not done by well-meaning people muddling into something which they didn’t understand.

      "What I am trying to suggest..."

  4. Dec 2019
    1. In each of these examples, Miles Morales: Spider- Man acts as a counter to canon-ical texts to provide students with an opportunity to challenge assumptions about heroes, youth, and schooling experiences

      Scott Smoot -- Word Sanctuary blog -- wrote about his own experiences of using this book to transform his thinking in the classroom.

    2. racebending

      I love this to add to my list of authorial choices. We talk about character arcs and irony and diction and tone; we talk about theme development and figurative language and description; let's add racebending to that list and widen our scope of text analysis; this, I believe, will help teachers, specifically white teachers, see the need for a more inclusive canon.

    3. By offering alternative represen-tations of both the hero and the villain, Reynolds’s text actively works to dismantle racial hierarchies

      I love this as a guideline for text selection. As we think about what texts we put in front of our students, can we accept that a majority of the texts that our students have seen in their educational careers are those that have centered whiteness. And given that, can we consider, when adopting and looking for new texts, how these new texts might work to offer that "alternative representations of both hero and villain." How refreshing would it be to see that as a question on a textbook adoption form?!

    4. Miles is aware that his race and eco-nomic status mark him as an outsider within Brook-lyn Visions Academy, noting that he is from the “part of Brooklyn that Brooklyn Visions Academy didn’t have much vision for at all” (259). Like its real- life counterparts in many urban areas, Brooklyn Visions Academy relies on a dress code that makes White, upper- middle- class culture, attitude, and beliefs aspi-rational (Hatt- Echeverria and Jo).

      So many places to stop here in the reading and discuss with students ways in which they might experience these same things.

    5. Racebending is also important because (re)casting characters using alternative race and ethnicities cre-ates possibilities for popular comics and other “clas-sics” to be told from underrepresented perspectives

      If you haven't started Watchmen yet, you're in for a treat (and a lesson in exactly this).

    6. The multiple and interconnected factors of underfunded schools, police presence, centering of White norms, and harsh punishment result in Black and Latinx stu-dents being forced out of schools and into prison sys-tems, whether directly or indirectly

      The question, for me, that arises here is what does this instruction look like in majority white institutions? As we continue to do this work, we are consistently running into the fact that the narrative we are telling about race in schools and students of color is counter to what our white students have been taught to believe. We are getting anger and resistance--so I wonder if it would be helpful to have students investigate some of these factors within in education in general--but even more specifically in their own communities and schools?

    7. To be young. To be old. To have like, poetry, poetry should be, Shakespeare’s sonnets and it should be by Queen Latifah. Teach comparative literature where you take Queen Latifah’s “Ladies First” and Maya Angelou’s “Phenomenal Woman” and you show young people that nothing is new. This is all a continuum. We are working with tradition. Then they can start to see their place in the things that they’re reading.

      I love this idea of comparative literature--and here it works--Queen Latifah and Maya Angelou--but I think we also have to be careful when making comparisons to ensure that whiteness is not still be centered. In my classroom, my first attempt at "revolutionizing" the canon involved looking at modern versions of revolution (Emma Gonzalez, Christine Blasey Ford, and more) and comparing them to Patrick Henry's Speech in the Virginia Convention. I quickly realized that by centering the conversation around Henry's rhetoric--and showing that "nothing is new," I was also showing that our focus on whiteness as the standard had not changed either.

    8. DisruptTexts
    9. Pairings

      Very valuable to have these kinds of charts .. thank you

    10. #SayHerName

      sayhername, explained -- and the fact that I didn't know what it was says a lot about society (white society) at large, I think.

    11. Ava duvernay
    12. chool- to- prison pipeline
    13. Mr. Chamberlain talks about the Civil War “like this beautiful, romantic thing” and defends slavery as “kind of good for the country”

      Interesting contrast for me, as I am reading The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead, in which the teacher is the exact opposite of Mile's teacher.

      “The class was focused on US history since the Civil War, but at every opportunity Mr. Hill guided them to the present, linking what happened a hundred years ago to their current lives. They’d set off down one road at the beginning of class and it always led back to their doorsteps.”

      -- from The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead, page 30

    14. Miles Morales: Spider-Man

      As an introduction to the article, you're very welcome to watch a webinar hosted by Christopher Rogers, featuring guest reader Latrice Ferguson, and both partner authors Mario Worlds and Cody Miller. https://youtu.be/qOyMmTrf_yo

    15. “there are other ways of thinking about time, there are other ways of thinking about place and community, what it means to win, be a hero, or save the world”

      Great quote ...

    16. some to fathom

      And often leads to trolls and others pushing back on the racebending initiatives with anger and vitriol -- Another example is Kamala Khan as Ms. Marvel --<br>

    17. Black and Latinx students are disproportionately punished within schools when they fail to succumb to those norms by teachers who have not critically examined their own cultural biases.

      Information from a study on this ... you have to go to pages 13-15 to see the charts ...

      Black male students represented 8 percent of enrolled students and accounted for 23 percent of students expelled. Black female students represented 8 percent of the student enrollment and accounted for 10 percent of students who were expelled. Latino male students accounted for 13 percent of students enrolled and 16 percent of students who were expelled. Latina female students accounted for 13 percent of student enrollment and 6 percent of students who were expelled.

    18. Miles Morales: Spider- Man
    19. Subsequently, teachers’ inability to challenge the status and content of the canon emboldens a hierarchy that places White char-acters learning about racism over characters of color experiencing racism.

      This is a good insight ....

    20. In recasting Spider- Man as Miles Morales, an Afro- Latino male, Marvel comics engaged in a pro-cess known as “racebending.

      Changing the race of characters in familiar stories is an approach to equity work in classrooms that I've seen in other texts in the #marginalsyllabus.

      Even Cinderella Is White: (Re)Centering Black Girls’ Voices as Literacies of Resistance is a text about asking students how fairy tales would be different if the characters were from different racial backgrounds.

    21. For the purpose of this article, we will exam-ine how curricular con-siderations such as a devotion to the literary canon and school policies and procedures relating to disci-pline uphold White supremacy.

      The curriculum considerations in schools can be entrenched in district politics and financial considerations. It is vital that teachers weigh the decisions that rest with them which can spark meaningful changes from the classroom level out.

    1. Still, like my mentor, my principal assumed that any investigation of race required people of color in order to be legitimate

      A common misbelief, I think. How do might we, as white educators, best educate our fellow white educators/administrator about this? Zaretta Hammond talks about the 3rd space when it comes to coaching (which I suppose this is), and asks us to consider what new information, research, experiences, etc. we might put in the 3rd space that will help those with whom we work to revise their understandings.

    2. leave white supremacy undisturbed.

      A great means of interrogating new texts for consideration--in what ways does this novel address white supremacy?

    3. But the expressions can be subtle too. My mentor, intending to be racially conscious, reacted to race by compulsively turning to his students of color. His whiteness, perhaps, was made invisible to him in this way. Instead of grappling with his own race, my mentor, through his teaching in an English classroom, served to affirm that race is always and only about people of color

      This is what white teachers need to acknowledge--even liberals who don't think they're doing harm. We have been so trained to see harm as overt and explicit. When, really, I cringe at the harm I have done simply through the texts I selected and the experiences I centered. A great wealth of resources for teachers starting to do this work is found here: https://www2.ncte.org/blog/2017/08/there-is-no-apolitical-classroom-resources-for-teaching-in-these-times/

    4. whiteness as my problem

      While I fully see my own whiteness as my problem--how do we help white students see this. I think this is where my instruction broke down in a unit focused on The Hate U Give. Some of my white students walked away angry. I don't think I helped them navigate their whiteness in a way that helped them grow.

    5. We discussed conditions of white supremacy in the book and in our daily lives as well.

      And what are books, if not, proxies for exploring our own worlds. This seems to be an ideal way to open students' eyes to a concept they may not have fully considered of named before.

    6. ace always seemed to be about students of color, not about the white supremacist structuring of school.

      This may just be a great jumping off place for our equity and justice team. It would be a nice inventory--How are we talking about race? Whose race are we talking about? How well do we understand our own whiteness? How well do we understand our student's races? We talk often about racial/cultural literacy--but that really means finding ways to study the cultures of our students--not our own cultures, races and practices and how those might influence our students' learning.

    7. whites learn to avoid thinking about whiteness, thereby making it extremely difficult for us to consider white supremacy without first confronting the conditional nature of this racial identity.

      which, in turn, leads to the perpetuation of white supremacy whose existence is secured by the fact that it goes and has gone unnamed even as it shapes Western Civilization.

    8. White people affirm a conception of people of color, identify as antiracist, and no longer have to work to understand white identity in relationship with a white supremacist reality.

      This is a nice summary of the check-out that looking at race solely through a white privilege lens might create--and as noted in a story the author shared in the video--for high school students, specifically, I'm not sure the reaction is that clean--often the result is frustration and anger that often becomes misguided.

    9. The thinking of Ralph Ellison, Mah-moud El Kati, Toni Morrison, Thandeka, and Richard Wright is central to my learning about whiteness

      I would add Ta-Nehisi Coates and Ibram X Kendi to this list.

    10. I’m convinced that white people also need to better understand white racial identity to engage anti-racism.

      What does "white racial identity" even mean? I am white, so I fit this category. I am also a woman, which means there are other biases I am faced with that my male colleagues do not experience.

      I grew up in a small town among a citizenry that was typically middle class, yet I was several rungs below most of them on the socio-economic ladder. How does my "whiteness" in that experience compare to that of my white peers? What about my experience in a small town vs those who grew up in urban environments?

      Identity is a very complex construct and involves so many facets that I find it too simplistic to lump it into "white" vs "people of color." The experience and identity of someone from India is different from that of one from Mexico or Nigeria, yet we can (and often do) call all of those "people of color."

      Are we asking the right questions?

    11. race usually refers to people of color

      Race often DOES refer to people of color. Maybe that is part of the problem? That we define race by color? A couple of years ago, I taught high school American History using race and class as the lenses through which we viewed our history. We began the year with a discussion on race and its definition. After a LOT of discussion and analysis, the students concluded that "race" is not real, but rather a social construct. As is also discussed in these NYT articles: https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2015/06/16/how-fluid-is-racial-identity/race-and-racial-identity-are-social-constructs. I wonder whether we should broaden the discussion to the wider issues of diversity, equity and inclusion?

    12. notion of haunting to suggest the past always shapes the present.

      I totally agree with this. Which is why I become enraged when the collective "we" tries to bury the past of our (American) history. In this category I include things like erasing artifacts of the American Civil War. The only way we will be able to heal the injuries is with honest conversations about our history, facing all the ugly AND beautiful truths.

  5. Nov 2019
    1. mARio WoRLdS And HEnRy “Cody” miLLER

      Our thanks to partner authors Mario Worlds and Cody Miller for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! Brief bios for both Mario and Cody are included at the end of this article. Also, the entire Marginal Syllabus team would like to congratulate Mario and Cody for winning the Paul and Kate Farmer English Journal Writing Award for their authorship of this article! The award was recently presented at the 2019 NCTE Annual Convention and recognizes outstanding English Journal articles written by classroom teachers - congrats!

    2. Mario Worlds and Cody Miller argue that to disrupt racial hierarchies we must purposefully disrupt the canon of literature.

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our December conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

    1. Whiteness Is a White Problem: Whiteness in English Education

      Annotation is a form of conversation.

      Using Hypothesis to read socially and publicly with other people is a unique learning opportunity.

      We urge Marginal Syllabus participants to share annotations that spark conversation and deepen our collective inquiry.

      Consider how your annotations might elicit dialogue rather than deliver a soliloquy.

      Author annotations that open spaces for other people and multiple perspectives.

      Please remember that discussing educational equity - and, specifically, topics that may be perceived as debatable or incompatible with personal experience - may be a challenging and new experience for some Marginal Syllabus participants. We welcome annotation that is:

      • Civil. We can disagree. And when we do so, let’s also respect one another.
      • Constructive. Share what you know. And build upon ideas that are relevant and informative.
      • Curious. Ask honest questions and listen openly to responses.
      • Creative. Model generative dialogue. Have fun. Contribute to and learn from the process.
    2. Samuel Jaye Tanner

      Our thanks to partner author Samuel Jaye Tanner for contributing to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus! A brief bio is included at the end of this article, and you can also learn more by visiting Sam's website.

    3. Welcome to the 2019-20 Marginal Syllabus and our November conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." Our reading is part of the second LEARN syllabus co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus sparks and sustains public conversation about educational equity through collaborative technologies and partnerships. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech.

    4. White people have been damaged in becoming white, and this damage informs the ways white people move through the world. White people must be ready to work with that wreckage as we seek out better, more human ways to be in relationship to white supremacy.

      One on hand, this is a pretty bold assertion -- all white people is assumed in this sentence. Painting large brush strokes like that is always precarious. On the other, the second line is very poetic and attuned to the nature of change.

    5. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you are using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    6. Still, I worry none of these actions listed above actually help me figure out my problem

      DiAngelo argues that white people should try to "be less white." I wonder how Tanner feels about that idea, which seems markedly different than understanding whiteness as a racial identity rife with challenges.

    7. Yes, it seemed fair to evoke Joan’s reaction to my proposal. Still, my principal turned to Joan almost compulsively. My principal placed the burden of approving or rejecting my project about whiteness on a Black person, even though it was my principal’s job to sign off on the work.

      This is such a powerful example. Has anyone else been in a position where they automatically asked for a person of color's opinion before stating their own?

    8. thought he was being racially conscious by deferring to people of color—Black students in this case—when issues of race came up.

      This is part of that exhausting burden of shouldering mentioned earlier.

    9. he reacted with aversion to the idea that I might use Black Boy to provoke an exploration of white supremacy with my white students in 11th-grade English.

      Reading the work of black authors is not just about making black students feel included.

    10. Why did I act white?

      Black people hear this consistently from other black people. But it's rare for me to hear a white person ask himself this, and it's very interesting.

    11. that actually impedes the efforts of antiracism work with white people.

      People are more than lists of privileges and we are not done with the work once we've checked all of the boxes.

    12. White people are haunted by race, too, whether it is recognized or not.

      The self-doubt of not deserving advantages and privileges, imposter syndrome, guilt, shame...

    13. I worry that white folks, with eagerness to reconcile race, ignore or look past the internal conflict at the core of white racial identity.

      I think this eagerness to reconcile race refers to the strong urge to separate the individual from the atrocities of one's race, ie. not all white people. Even if logically it goes without saying that an individual isn't responsible for an entire group, the tendency is to take this very personally.

    14. The Whiteness Project

      Is this the project?

    15. You talk so white

      And if he talked "black"? What would have the reaction been then, I wonder? I appreciate the storytelling here, of bringing us into an important moment, and being confronted by a student (in a way that clearly has resonated over time).

    16. Storytelling is, perhaps, an acutely useful tool for disrupting those logics.
    17. we don’t work to better understand ourselves.

      I tried to highlight this entire sentence but the page break broke my highlighter -- this insight seems important to me in this context of race and identity (and ultimately, how teachers in the classroom can become more attuned to race and equity and access). So, this is a note to myself (and you, if it is helpful) to come back to this sentence as an anchor point.

    18. This behavior places the burden (and promise) of disrupting white supremacy solely on people of color

      Hmmm. I'm not sure this is true, actually. There are many others who push against white supremacy who are white, who are organized and active, who confront it. Maybe not enough. We all need to do more. But to claim that the force of disruption is only people of color seems to overgeneralize the real world.

    19. creates dev-astation and death for people of color

      This is a pretty strong and powerful, and provocative, way to frame this piece. I had to pause here. To think about this. For it is true, but is it true for everyone who is white? Everyone who is not? This is a signal that this piece will push to us examine our own identities.

    20. Why did I act white?

      Powerful question; I appreciate this reflective stance in response to student comments and questions.

    21. use theater

      I love this use of theater and the physical nature of it (referring back to my notes about physicality above). In my own experience, I do think physical theater helps with really hard ideas and conversations. Sam talked about this a bit - at 48:13 he talks the way that "race is an embodied thing, it is an emotional thing and the one thing I love about theater ... you don't have to talk about race in these overaly rational ways that almost sometimes take us away from the deeply felt experience of it."

      He then describes more about the ways that he and colleague have recently been engages in an inquiry project using improv theater with elementary students.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJT1pZCMddA#action=share

    22. choosing and teaching texts that do celebrate multiculturalism, but leave white supremacy undisturbed

      I have been thinking about this on a personal level as I read children's books to my niece and nephew who are African American. It's not enough to just show black people doing great things - for example Jackie Robinson - without unpacking what it means to be "first" and what was in the way in the first place. I am still trying to figure out the right language to shift the narrative in a way that makes sense at 3 and 6 yo.

    23. has led to a confessional framework

      Yes, I have seen this happen; helpful to unpack this here. Wondering how my colleagues at local sites approach these conversations in the context of their work and institutes? What could we rethink and rework?

    24. haunting

      haunting/haunted

    25. hesitation

      hesitation/hesitating

    26. shoulder

      shoulder/shouldering

    27. xhausting

      exhausting

    28. grapple

      A lot of words in this essay are very physical, like grapple. I will note a few below that I highlighted as I was reading this.

    29. Dr. April Baker-Bel

      Dr. Baker-Bell was a Marginal Syllabus partner author during the 2017-18 "Writing Our Civic Futures" syllabus. Read "The Stories They Tell: Mainstream Media, Pedagogies of Healing and Critical Media Literacy" by April Baker-Bell, Raven Jones Stanbrough, and Sakeena Everett published in the January 2017 edition of English Education. Dr. Baker-Bell also recommended to the Marginal Syllabus team that we include this article in our current syllabus.

    30. Dr. Lamar Johnso

      Dr. Johnson is a partner author with this 2019-2020 LEARN Marginal Syllabus. We'll be reading and discussing Dr. Johnson's article “Where Do We Go From Here? Toward a Critical Race English Education” in June of 2020 as the concluding conversation of this syllabus.

    31. I’m white

      "When did you become white?" As a teacher educator, Sam asks some version of this question to his white pre-service English teachers during their coursework. The question serves as a prompt for a writing exercise and subsequent discussion. If you self-identity as white, you may want to consider, and perhaps also respond to, Sam's questions:

      • When did you become white?
      • And what and how have you learned from this?
  6. Oct 2019
    1. dominating logics of white supremacy.

      I'm curious to dig into this notion of the logics of white supremacy. One such logic is to confine the definitions of "racism" and "white supremacy" to overt actions of violence and gross forms of discrimination, while dismissing more subtle but pervasive forms.

    2. Their emotional lives are warped, and they don’t even know why.

      I visited my daughter's class last year- she's in fourth grade- and students were presenting poster sessions about famous Coloradans. Several of the students studied Chief Little Raven, including my daughter. In each poster session about the Southern Arapahoe Chief, white children would speak about the duplicitous actions of the whites and I was glad to hear the students talk plainly about violence and theft. I went home that day wondering how those white students were making sense of the profound messages their studies held for them about their own race.

    3. Overt white supremacist violence is an obvious expression of the problem of the white race. This explicit violence is easy to denounce. But, I wonder if something more subtle is already happening with those of us who have been made white in a white suprema-cist society.

      I grew up understanding acts of racial hatred and intimidation as "white supremacy." White tolerance for inequitable conditions, and the failure to investigate the ways white privilege perpetuates inequity are at issue here.

    4. separatefrom the issues of people of color is not encountered

      A key point in this piece and, to me, an important distinction in equity work.

    5. Mediate feels like the right word to use here.

      The author is explicit about trying to get a feel for a constructive way forward.

    6. White people need to be honest now, and honest in a way that doesn’t erase the work of scholars of color who have led in this area. I fear the silence of white people represses the real, complex weight of whiteness.

      This connects back to the comment I added earlier: this is an incredibly fine line to walk and we must be careful of decentering whiteness while also making room for the honesty of white people.

    7. I’m complicit and will never be absolved. So what else can we white people do?

      Yes. I am also complicit and I will never be absolved. This is the work of a lifetime.

    8. Here I was in a predominantly white school district, being assured that it was committed to antiracism. Still, nobody seemed to actu-ally want to talk about whiteness.

      While I never have taught in a predominantly white context, this echoes my own experiences in educational spaces, especially with my fellow white teachers and educators.

    9. 187Tanner > Whiteness Is a White Problemnary) stereotypes of people of color mediate white people’s understanding of race is helpful here. It might be easier for white people to see race in people of color because doing so—that is, mediating whiteness through people of color—gives white people a way out of confronting race and racism. To explore some of the ways that white people mediate race through people of color, I now turn to moments of my own racial story. These mo-ments, or stories, focus on experiences from my time as a high school English teacher and now as an English education scholar.A Story about Our White ProblemMy first teaching job forced me to grapple with my whiteness.I was hired to teach English and drama at a large, urban high school in a major city in the Midwest. It was 2003, and I was 23 years old. Cardinal’s3students were predominantly Black—Black students made up 65 percent of the overall school’s population.My experience as a teacher at Cardinal forced me to account for my whiteness. In my first year of teaching, students constantly reminded me that I was, in fact, white.

      My early teaching career also forced me to grapple with my whiteness. For the first time in my life, I had sustained, daily experiences of being the only white person in the room. I had already explored my whiteness through a mentor who encouraged me to name and grapple with my own internalized racism. I believe this allowed me to approach my students with a humility and awareness of my own racism.

    10. My intention is that this article be a signal to our field that white folks ought to more deliberately wrestle with whiteness, without making race always and only about people of color. In this way, white people might begin to better shoulder some of the work of disrupting white supremacy.

      I agree that this important work for white people to take up in educational spaces. However, I feel the danger of taking up all the air in the room as white people grapple with their own biases, behavior, and supremacy. In conversations about diversity, justice, equity, inclusion white people can eat up all the time with our feelings of white guilt. How do we allow for space for white educators to take on this work without taking up all the space for discussion? How do we do this work without silencing our peers of color who aren't as privileged as we are?

    11. sociocultural privileges

      I have found Robin DiAngelo's work to be helpful in my own racial identity work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwIx3KQer54

    12. I’m white and it feels like my responsibility to grapple with the prob-lem of my race

      I'm also white and will be annotating from this white identity.

    1. Choose books that are tribally specific.

      Teachers can connect the books to their own specific state or residence. This would allow for strong connections to be made amongst students, and even amongst the community.

    2. When teachers use Thanksgiving as the vehicle for their instruction about Native peoples, they are inadvertently locat-ing Native lives in the past

      Although not commonly thought, this statement is true. Rather than living in the past, teachers should be using activities that surround Thanksgiving as a way to reteach about Native peoples.

    3. The idea is that the quality of a story is improved when the person creating that story is an insider who knows what to share and how to share it with outsiders

      This is important.

    4. Teachers can make choices that do justice to Native stories by choosing books written by Native writers.

      Identifies a solution to the issue at hand.

    5. privileges

      Privellege v.s. Oppression

      Sterotypes such as this are harmful when reinforced in the context of literature.

    6. critical literacies perspective gives voice to how sto-ries are presented

      Allows for those who are directly impacted to have voice, and speak upon their own experiences from a first person perspective.

    7. Whose story is this? Who benefits from this story? Whose voices are not being heard?

      Crtical questions that aid in overall students understanding of Indigenous People.

      I found the question "whose voices are not being heard" to be the most impactful. It allows students to read beyond the text and realy assess where the root of the issue lies.

    8. rethink literature used to teach children about Indigenous peoples

      Issue being addressed throughout the article. Importance placed upon teaching students/children about Indigenous people.

    9. Teachers are critical in categorizing, selecting, and (re)presenting Indigenous communities through children’s literature

      Teacher's are given the opportunity to select literature for their students. It is expected for the literarture to be well-versed and fairly represent Indigenous communities. Societies greatest downfall is in the fact that we are not knowledgable on communities that differ from our own.

    10. unlearning

      I think the act of "unlearning" is an important takeaway. Although sterotypes are common in today's society, that does not justify them being used.

    11. being specific helps non- Native people learn that we are far more diverse

      Helps bridge the gap in societies current misunderstanding regarding Native people and tribal nations.

  7. Jul 2019
    1. We will explore concepts of trust-play-annotate-imagine-curate through reading, writing, moving, improvising, creating, noticing, reflecting, and being.

      Michelle's work connects with #marginalsyllabus

  8. Jun 2019
  9. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. We

      I'm interested to learn more about this "we" and how the group functions on an individual and collective level. I also read the title as a way for the members of the "we" to distinguish themselves and "how [they] do it" from other groups and how those groups do "it," which I'm assuming is teaching English with technology. Last note: I now have Montell Jordan's "This Is How We Do It" in my head as I begin the article, which is a plus.

    1. We unapol-ogetically state that schools not only are prison for Black girls but that schools are actively reproduc-ing slavery in its afterlife in English language arts. When Black girls’ identities, ways of learning, and leadership capacities are symbolically bonded by chains through a White-only curriculum, cultur-ally biased literary texts, and pedagogical standards, Black female students are in fact experiencing nor-malized racial violence.

      As a White educator, I am constantly reflecting on the ways I am complicit in normalizing racial violence. By naming it, I hope to dismantle it. I have to assume that my Whiteness will make me blind and I have to actively move myself into uncomfortable questions about my complicity and stay there so that I don't continue this cycle of violence.

    2. To minimize the lived experiences of Black girls demonstrates what Nigerian writer Chima-manda Ngozi Adichie called the danger of a single story: the complexity of Black girls’ lives reduced to a single, often stereotypical narrative weakens their humanity

      Here is another way this harms Black girls: there are very few children's books that focus on the relationship with Nature that feature children of color. https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/05/the-lack-of-diversity-in-childrens-books-about-nature/590152/

    3. Many of these stories include or suggest that the protagonist is both White and female. This practice often prevents many Black female learners from en-visioning themselves as queens or princesses.

      As a white person teaching in a classroom with predominantly Black students, I was struck early in my career with the way my own racial identity and my students' racial identities were part of the readers experience--reading To Kill A Mockingbird together we had a collective moment of confusion when I realized that they were reading Scout, Jem, and Atticus as Black characters while I understood them to be White. It was my first realization that so many white authors describe white characters without mention of race and every other ethnicity is named. My White privilege had blinded me to this fact for my whole life.

    4. Black women writ-ers and poets, including Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Toni Morrison’s Be-loved,provide Black female students a purview into the narratives of pain, restoration, and Black suffer-ing from the voices of Black women.

      This is reminding me how I had a history of Education class in graduate school that included Song of Solomon as required reading and how powerful that was in my experience in that course. Makes me think more about the ways I might bring in literature by Black women into my current graduate teaching.

    5. freedom dreams
    6. As with Huckleberry Finn, Cinderella, and Snow White, English educators often regard liter-ary texts with predominately white characters as “credible” and “classic” examples of “appropriate” English literature.

      My African-American nephew recently worked on a hands-on STEM project at school that asked him to figure out how to get Rapunzel out of her tower. While maybe a great problem-solving project in many ways, these stories with white characters (not to mention the gender dynamics here too) continue to get replicated through the disciplines. This article has me wondering how a counter process could be used.

    7. chools are actively reproduc-ing slavery in its afterlife in English language arts

      A powerful statement for us as writing project educators to reflect upon and engage.

    8. In 1965, Nancy Larrick wrote the article “The All-White World of Children’s Books” in response to a five-year-old Black girl’s question regarding the invisibility of Black characters in children’s books

      That work is available online here (first 3 pages), and here (last 2 pages).

    9. Ngozi Adichie called the danger of a single story:

      This talk is a must-watch for educators today. https://youtu.be/D9Ihs241zeg

    10. 12-year-old Black girl Marley Dias’s #1000BlackGirlBooks have worked to decriminalize lit-eracy for Black girls.

      This is a powerful example of youth activism that has helped shed a light on the scarcity of Black girl characters in classroom libraries and in the books English classrooms foreground. https://youtu.be/U2nN01Pwv_E

    11. Black girls who are in English education classrooms that deject them to learn from majority White literary texts and de-value works by Black women authors are facing modern-day forms of educational enslavement.

      The curriculum subtly teaches them they belong in a lower station while reinforcing for white students that their stories have primacy.

    12. We posit that the acceptance and reproduction of anti-Blackness in in-school (through school discipline disproportion-ality, tracking, etc.) and out-of-school spaces (as ev-idenced in unlawful arrests and mass incarceration of Black communities) have contributed to the hy-perpathologization of Black people.

      As schools are obsessed by data, this contention seems well supported by all kinds of data. I'm thankful that this piece provides guidance about how to take on the inequities that persist in schools in the form of curricular biases and practices rooted in white supremacy.

  10. May 2019
    1. 102English Journal 107.6 (2018): 102–108Jemimah L. Young, Marquita D. Foster, and Dorothy Hines

      Our thanks to partner authors Jemimah Young, Marquita Foster, and Dorothy Hines for contributing to the 2018-19 LEARN Marginal Syllabus! Bios for each partner author are included at the end of this article.

    2. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

  11. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Baker-Doyle, K. J.

      Thank you Kira Baker-Doyle! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our fourth conversation! This is the fourth article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  12. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology & Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. West-Puckett, S., Smith, A., Cantrill, C., &Zamora, M.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our third conversation! This is the third article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  13. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Hsieh, B.

      Thank you Betina Hsieh! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our second conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

  14. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

      And thank you CITE! CITE is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal whose support for the 2019 Marginal Syllabus is most appreciated.

    2. Watulak, S. L., Woodard, R., Smith, A., Johnson, L., Phillips, N., & Wargo, K.

      Thank you partner authors! The Marginal Syllabus is most appreciative of partner authors who agree to have their scholarship publicly annotated to support openly-networked and interest-driven professional learning. Read more about Marginal Syllabus author partnerships.

    3. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    4. Welcome to the summer 2019 Marginal Syllabus and our first conversation! This is the first article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Connected Learning in Teacher Education." This Marginal Syllabus has been co-developed in partnership with the Connected Learning in Teacher Education (CLinTE) network, the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open and collaborative web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education.

      What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial educational technology. Thanks for joining us this summer!

    1. bit.ly/2cyzCfq

      I didn't notice this in my first read. It is a link to a lesson plan on Read Write Think. It strikes me that the kind of social annotation we're engaged in here could help groups of teachers share their reactions to these plans and results from teaching them.

    2. Similarly, the counter-narrative allows the researcher and participants to study and name a reality inconsistent with what might be consid-ered the norm or pervasive otherwise. A recurrent theme of this body of work is that the narrative and counter-narrative should be captured by the researcher, experienced by the research partici-pants, and told by people of color. (542)

      A great lens for teachers and school leaders.

    3. Since then, Michelle Alexan-der and others have shown in their research that the prison incarceration rates increased full-blown to 600 percent from the mid-1960s until the 2000s to now reflect a “racial caste system” (Alexander 2).

      It is so important that Alexander's work foregrounds this piece. The problem of mass incarceration must guide the decisions teachers make in the classroom. Her writing should change syllabi, revise rubrics and rearrange the furniture in classrooms.

    4. For Step 2, I shared two kinds of research: (1)the knowledge that we already possess and know from our own experience, and (2) the knowledge that is gained from formal research in the exterior world by seeking articles, books, news-papers, magazines, and peer-reviewed online sites.

      Highlighting the importance of the knowledge we already possess revalues the voices of the students and the stories they can gather from family and community members.

    5. P]eople need to read, write, and speak in certain sorts of socially sanctioned ways if they have any hopes of confronting problematic texts or producing informative and empowering ones.

      The hope with new technologies is that we can continually press forward in negotiating what is socially sanctioned. As norms for political discourse change with the advent of new media, how can we put our fingers on the scales of justice to advance equity? I hope we can advance this type of writing.

    6. The students’ persistence in the quest for change

      Everardo shares more about this persistence and the long labor of this work in the discussion with the authors (start around 4:00 as he starts to describe more about the context): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpJZo8uKKbg

    7. to tell a counternarrative

      This notion of counternarratives is a strong core theme throughout the LEARN Marginal Syllabus readings this year, https://educatorinnovator.org/campaigns/literacy-equity-remarkable-notes-learn-marginal-syllabus-2018-19/

    8. Everardo Pedraza and R. Joseph Rodríguez

      Our thanks to partner authors Everardo Pedraza and Joseph Rodriguez for contributing to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus! A short bio of each author is included at the end of this article. And a Connected Learning TV webinar with both partner authors, and regular Marginal Syllabus participants, will go live on Tuesday, May 7th (and will be included in this annotation, too).

    9. If you are joining a Marginal Syllabus conversation for the first time, or if you're using Hypothesis to annotate for the first time, here are a few useful notes and resources:

    10. Welcome to the 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus and our Month conversation! This is the second article we will read and publicly annotate as part of "Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN." LEARN has been co-developed in partnership with the National Writing Project (NWP), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Hypothesis. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversation via open web annotation with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. What's "marginal" about the Marginal Syllabus? We partner with authors whose writing is contrary to dominant education norms, we read and annotate in the margins of online texts, and we discuss educational equity using open-source technology that’s marginal to commercial edtech. Read the full 2018-19 syllabus here.

  15. Apr 2019
    1. These examples demonstrate Kara’s efforts to help her students critically examine place and see themselves as actors in creating a “consequential geography” (Soja, 2010, p. 1), particularly of the spaces they call home.

      This seems most important ....

    2. Kara also required her students to explore food options available in a one-mile radius around their school to determine whether they were part of a food desert

      Maybe she did this but it would be neat to see this as a map ... maybe even a layered map, with student narratives overlayed on top (like with ThingLink or something)

    3. Urban spaces, for example, are dense ecologies with complex networks of materials (both “natural” and human-made) and histories of race, class, and power dynamics (e.g., changing neighborhood demographics, systemic housing discrimination).

      and maybe history is another layer in this dense geography -- what has happened before echoing (for good or for not) into what is happening now in any given space ...

    4. teacher inquiry group focused on cultivating culturally sustaining ELA pedagogy

      Noting that these educators have been working with each other in an inquiry context.

    5. Kara cultivated her students’ urban literacies by encouraging them to draw from their local knowledge of self, culture, and place; to critically situate their local knowledge in broader sociopolitical contexts; and to craft counter narratives

      She does this masterfully too -- listen to her describe the way she supports youth in following shared inquiries and discovering for themselves the interconnected elements -- start around 15:45 with Chris's question and go to 29:45

      https://youtu.be/Gq9AQvjh_PY

    6. A pedagogy of spatial justice, then, supports the development of urban literacies

      I find this really interesting; how inquiring into (spatial) justice itself supports literacy development. A powerful notion that speaks to the ways we develop literacy socially and communally and based on shared purpose.

    7. Soja describes spatial justice in urban contexts as “fighting for the right to the city” (p. 6).

      The Right to the City Alliance has turned this work from lefebvre, and turned it into a movement. I have cited their work in a previous class I taught. Find out more about them: https://righttothecity.org/,

      and here's a video from them: https://vimeo.com/87908751