57 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
    1. The ‘Why’ of MultiliteraciesFirst, why literacy? Or even more fundamentally, why education (in which literacy is a ‘basic’)? On this front, not much has changed in ten years. The two sides of the political spectrum, characterised loosely as ‘left’ and ‘right’, remain poles apart in what they see as the appropriate role of literacy learning in society, and indeed, education in general.

      Well, I think there is a lot has changed since this article (2009) and the question is not "Why?" anymore. The real hard question is "How"? How are we going to keep up with the speed of changing technology and new digital literacies? How can we make sure that every child gets the opportunity to spend ample time on the computer, creating, building, constructing and not only consuming? How can we scaffold teachers so they are skilled and capable of using new digital literacies?

  2. Aug 2018
    1. And when you like a sound or an instrumental, you want to approach it the right way. So you sit on it.

      Every writer should read this paragraph. Sometimes you need to sit on it, give it time to marinate. So many ways to approach sitting on it, of course, but that's just glorious detail.

    2. It starts there first, before I even heard any type of melody or lyric. That's just DNA

      This is flat out a paen to absorbing literacies through the early experiences with our families and communities, but especially, especially our parents. Kendrick says it himself, his parents sharing their culture made his glorious unfolding possible.

  3. Jul 2018
    1. Teaching Tech Together

      Resources to help design/conduct effective teaching about technology.

  4. Jun 2018
  5. Jan 2018
    1. Como hipótesis provisional sostengo que la dependencia de formas de racionalidad y análisis logocéntrico de larga data sigue siendo fundamental para la producción académica crítica (¡incluyendo este libro!) y que, a pesar de su notable productividad, tiene consecuencias para ir más allá de las ontologías dualistas. Para desarrollar esta hipótesis, aunque de forma rudimentaria, comienzo recordando el argumento de Varela y sus colegas sobre los límites de la racionalidad abstracta y su insistencia en unir la reflexión y la experiencia. Esto es precisamente lo que trató de hacer la fenomenología; sin embargo —argumentan Varela, Thomson y Rosch— no pudo contestar, completamente, las preguntas radicales que planteaba. ¿Por qué? Su respuesta es relativamente simple pero las consecuencias son de largo alcance. La fenomenología se estancó, precisamente, porque su análisis de la experiencia sigue estando “dentro de la corriente principal de la filosofía Occidental [...] hizo hincapié en el contexto pragmático y encarnado de la experiencia humana, pero de una manera puramente teórica” (Varela et al. 1991: 19). ¿Puede esta afirmación17ser aplicable a la teoría social en su conjunto, tal vez incluso a aquellas tendencias que problematizan sus dualismos estructurantes?

      [...] [...] Lo que esta formulación quiere transmitir es que la reflexión no es sólo sobre la experiencia; la reflexión es una forma de la experiencia [...] Cuando la reflexión se hace de esa manera puede cortar la cadena de patrones y percepciones habituales de pensamiento para que pueda ser una reflexión abierta a posibilidades distintas de las contenidas en la representación actual que tenemos del espacio de la vida

      Quizás se requieren materialidades nuevas para romper estas lógicas que hacen academia crítica desde los logos, métricas y formas de la academia clásica. En ese sentido la experiencia, que está en el centro de lo hacker, artítistico y activista es clave, pues enactua en discursos no siempre logocéntricos. Es decir, esas reflexiones (usualmente escritas) que son también una experiencia, atravesadas por otras materialidades que dan cuenta de ellas pueden ayudar a deconstruir su expresión logocéntrica.

    1. Digital and Information Literacies

      From my POV, this is an incredibly important priority, not just for education, but for everyone, everywhere, as we have been going through a dramatic breakdown in shared understandings of literacies. I credit @bryanalexander for helping me to always think of literacies plural instead of this or that singular literacy.

  6. Dec 2017
  7. Nov 2017
    1. whether or not they fact-check the things they share or re-share on Facebook
    2. attention paid to the ways in which our students consume and digest information
    3. But if they are learning how to build on the Web they probably need to know something about becoming findable (or unfindable) on the Web. And by extension they need to understand how the power behind that findability is impacting the course of human history. 12 months ago if I had said that, some people would have rolled their eyes at me, but I think it’s safe to say that in the last 9 months we’ve all realized just how powerful algorithms are in shaping the outcomes of our culture.

      This is a pretty useful example of a paragraph with subtext, don’t you think? Could easily imagine future readers and annotators coming to this passage and scratching their heads for a minute while looking at the date. What happened nine months before June 2017? Living outside the US, it took me a few seconds to guess it (and my guess may be wrong). Of course, Martha was “playing for the audience” (though DoOO is having an impact outside the US). There’s indeed a shared understanding that events in the political arena may be relevant in our work on digital literacies.

    4. In this particular case, Google worked as a kind of amplifier of distortion.
  8. Oct 2017
    1. What is often lost by many educators and progressives is that popular culture is a powerful form of education for many young people, and yet it is rarely addressed as a serious source of knowledge

      more on point 3/6: pop culture has to be taken seriously

    2. developing alternative public spheres

      more on point 3/6: alternative public spheres

    3. They must also learn how to be cultural producers

      more on point 3/6: literacies require information production, not just consumption

    4. educators need to develop a comprehensive educational program that would include teaching students how to live in a world marked by multiple overlapping modes of literacy extending from print to visual culture and screen cultures

      Point 3/6

    5. Far more than a teaching method, education is a moral and political practice actively involved not only in the production of knowledge, skills and values but also in the construction of identities, modes of identification, and forms of individual and social agency.

      As in OKP's literacies, skills, identities, communities. Should values and agency be included in this list or are they the products of these other focuses?

    6. civic literacy

      On civic literacy.

    1. Group Behavior and the Tragedy of the Obvious Choice

      When Mike talks here of RDMAs, I can't help but think he's talking about me.

    2. problems of diffuse authority

      I assume Mike is connecting this to his thinking about how we need effective news filters in order to shoulder a large part of the responsibility for factchecking because we all don't usually have the time or the expertise.

    1. As I find the conversation in the OpenEd community start to concentrate around platforms–specifically OER textbook platforms–I want to ask to what standards are we holding these platforms accountable?

      What literacies do we need to evaluate platforms?

  9. Sep 2017
    1. Matt Ratto (2011) defines "critical making" as a combination of critical thinking and material production. His contribution for the current discussion is: if critical makers can "reintegrate technical and social work and thereby innovate both" (p. 258). Design appears a fertile inroad for thinking about empowerment and politics, as particular genres of technology are created through complex social, economic, and cultural processes, leading to literacies that can be drawn on and reconfigured (Balsamo, 2011 ). DiSalvo's (2009) notion of critical making involves users in the design process through practices such as tracing and projection, resulting in the creation of new publics. This was later developed into "adversarial design" (DiSalvo, 2012), which confronts the politics of technologies of objects with an intent to encourage participation. Rafi Santo's (2011, 2013) "hacker literacies" similarly positions hacking as enabling critical thinking within a framework of media literacies.

      Rafi Santo's (2011, 2013) "hacker literacies" similarly positions hacking as enabling critical thinking within a framework of media literacies.

  10. Jul 2017
    1. A dual-level theory of New Literacies conceptualizes literacy at low-ercase (new literacies) and uppercase (New Literacies) levels. Lowercase theories of new literacies explore several types of elements: (1) a set of new literacies required by a specific technology and its social practices such as text messaging (Lewis & Fabos, 2005); (2) a disciplinary base, such as the semiotics of multimodality in online media (Kress, 2003); or (3) a distinctive, conceptual approach such as new literacy studies (Street, 2003).
  11. May 2017
    1. our student-teacher relationship was evidence of our common skill in reading

      This is such an important sentence to me for a few reasons. First, it identifies that in this precarious relationship between teacher and student, the reading that is most vital is the ability to read each other's intentions. Second, in the relationship between high school English teacher and marginalized student with challenging life circumstances, LaMay asserts that they share a common skill in reading. That strikes me as a way of revaluing the literacy that Abraham brings. He's a relationship reader, engaging with only with the teachers he trusts.

  12. Mar 2017
  13. Sep 2016
    1. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

    2. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

  14. Aug 2016
    1. The definition of literacy has evolved in the 21st century. The basic definition of literacy means to be able to read and write. To be successful in today’s digital world, literacy goes far beyond being able to read and write. What it means to be digitally literate has reflected the change in how information is processed, delivered, and received in today’s highly connected world.

      This is pointing to an expanded definition of literacy with the growth of technology. It argues that literacy in today's world goes far beyond just knowing how to read and write.

  15. Jul 2016
    1. qualitatively extend the notions of 'reading, writing, sharing, publishing, etc. of ideas' literacy to include the 'computer reading, writing, sharing, publishing of ideas
    2. He believed this would foster a new literacy, a literacy that would bring about a revolution akin to the changes brought about by the printing press in the 16th and 17th centuries.
    1. Our research indicates that individuals exercise a great deal of critical evaluation of sources in non-academic contexts (as in the case of looking for good restaurants, or shopping for new cars, for instance). It may be of value to explore these personal evaluation practices with students, encouraging them to apply them in academic contexts.

      +1 Insightful

  16. Jun 2016
    1. For this example, I pursued the meme idea since that fits in nicely with the workshop on open content that we did earlier this summer, but without specifying the nitty-gritty of the community space

      I think memes can be a great way to reach students. Here is an easy project I made: https://thimbleprojects.org/jgmac1106/1979/

  17. Feb 2016
    1. What are the playful qualities of learners’ open and socially networked annotation?
    2. Like writing in the margins of a book, I too appreciate how easily Hypothesis allows me to author and share “my thoughts as I go” – and to do so for a broader audience (anyone who installs the browser extension), and through a greater range of expressive representation (including text, hyperlinks, and embedded media).

      Agreed. It is nice to be able to respond inline because it provides a specificity of context to each comment.

    1. A politician whose persuasive stump speech does not rely on the resonance of value-laden memes?

      Image Description

    2. The increasing use of within-text hyperlinks and QR codes deserves consideration in academic journals. “I’ve done my homework, here are the shoulders upon which I stand, but feel free to read on coherently to process the idea I am trying to convey.” The flow of this in typical journalism is both more immediate and more honest.

      This type of online annotation might inform a truly transparent and "honest" process, too.

    3. MLA and APA police still rule, however, even as the Internet increases available and accessible content at exponential rates, and the real need to teach source and content evaluation supersedes the need to teach note-taking and citation.

      MLA and APA police still rule in the classroom and largely in academia, but when academics engage in professional back-and-forth blogging, they are quick to dispense with many of the formalities.

    4. For substantially all ideas are second hand, consciously or unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources and daily use by the garnerer with a pride and satisfaction born of the superstition that he originated them; whereas there is not a rag of originality about them any where except the little discoloration they get from his mental and moral calibre and his temperament, which is revealed in characteristics of phrasing.

      Some "discoloration" might also result from the modality and the digital tools someone employs in the remix, an evolution of phrasing.

    5. We watch as solid, slow moving, hermetic traditions of the academy are challenged by the fluid, fast-moving, and crowd-sourced affordances of contemporary digital media.

      Challenged and replaced, for all practical purposes. Pettitt's concept of the Gutenberg Parenthesis resonates. Image Description

  18. Oct 2015
  19. May 2015
    1. as researchers and policy makers look to build more sustainable futures, they would be wise to design creative ways to support parents even as they pour more resources into supporting students. We instinctively understand that our public institutions (i.e., schools), policy initiatives, and the spread of media technologies must be a valuable resource for students. But, how can these institutions, policies and technologies become an asset for parents?
  20. Mar 2015
    1. reading might be described as the continual redisposition of levels of address in this manner

      Another useful (and cool) definition

    2. massive flexibility in levels of address

      The ability to fluently read/react with a text at a given level of address be treated as a literacy.

  21. Jan 2015
    1. We are using the term phygital as a way of emphasizing that these are a class of objects that have not simply had some digital functionality embedded within then but are connected devices whose functionality and operation is designed to exist simultaneously in both virtual and physical space.

      defining "phygital"

    2. this paper is speculating on a future in which creating game objects that link the physical and the digital presents an exciting and practical opportunity for game designers. However, such objects require interaction design approaches that not only utilise understandings from product design and graphical user interface but also how they might effectively be combined dynamically.

      Yep

    3. Example Game/Interaction Spaces for Game Objects used with Screens.

      This diagram showing interface interaction between screen space, player space and 3D space is intriguing

    4. Dan Saffer suggests hidden affordances may actually be regarded as ‘discoverable’ (Saffer 2013) in recognition that designers may deliberately allow them to be revealed through accidental use or deliberate exploration. This is similar to the practice of game designers leaving hidden elements, or ‘easter eggs’, within their games that are discovered by accident, this practice hints at a possible interesting opportunity yet to be applied to game objects.

      The use of 'easter eggs' inside game design -- purposeful hidden objects and pathways that fall outside the common map of the game - is fascinating. I have students who say they play games in order to find these elements.

    5. the interaction design of phygital objects for games requires games designers to not only fully understand the virtual aspects the affordances they are perhaps used to, but also to extend these to include the affordances we associate with physical objects to ensure their overall game design does not cause confusion for the player.

      agency considerations in design planning

    6. Interaction Design as defined by Verplank

      Interesting sketch here of equating emotions to our view of the world, and how we interact with information.

    7. mimetic interfaces

      When the virtual (game play) action is analogous to physical action .. ie, guitar hero: You play a guitar, not a joystick ..

    8. phygita

      Now, there's a word I have not seen before.

    9. Internet of Things

      I hate this term ... more marketing for businesses than reality in our lives.

    10. games that use objects as physical game pieces to enhance the players’ interaction with virtual games.

      Intriguing .. pushing the boundaries between the tangible and the virtual ...