21 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2019
    1. In its purest form, fake news is completely made up, manipulated to resemble credible journalism and attract maximum attention and, with it, advertising revenue. Examples include: “Transgender tampon now on the market”, “Pope Francis at White House: ‘Koran and Holy Bible are the same’”, “U2’s Bono rescued during terror attack, issues sick message to victims”.

      In regards to literation literacy information literacy has evolved from what it was to what it is now, back then they would use references and sources to get information. Now it says in order for you to talk about news you just have to be equipped with the ability to recognize the information to report on. Fake news now today can be just a lot of made up things to make an individual look bad and people would believe it even if it is not even true or real facts.

  2. May 2018
    1. IREX says that its L2D seminars “reached more than 15,000 people of all ages and professional backgrounds” through a “train the trainers” model, in which 361 community leaders were trained on how to teach media literacy skills and then conducted workshops in their own communities — mostly in hubs like libraries. Each leaders trained roughly 40 people.

      Existe t-il des expériences similaires en France? Ailleurs?

  3. Feb 2018
    1. But Alphabet did flag “misleading” information and “objectionable content” as risks to the company’s financial performance in its annual report this week, for the first time ever.

      Google's parent company now includes information disorder as a factor in its profitability and success.

  4. Oct 2017
    1. problems of diffuse authority

      I assume Mike is connecting this to his thinking about how we need effective news filters in order to shoulder a large part of the responsibility for factchecking because we all don't usually have the time or the expertise.

  5. Jun 2017
    1. 15 JunVeterinary Pharmaceuticals Company to work with BZU in manufacturing and research

      This is a test comment ... ok, i think this is a lie

  6. May 2017
    1. Summary: I really appreciate this post because of many reasons. The title for one is great and offers a twist to many of the other Fake News spotting articles I have seen, it is more empowering, and I want to empower my students when I teach them about Fake News. The summary for this is the same as the other two, educational about Fake News by a reliable source, so I will leave it to that. Assessment: I like how this article has ten questions with mini-questions underneath. It highlights important words in red and by having a red flag to symvolize Fake News, it can help the reader put the two together. This source is almost like a mix of the two other ones I have, it is a good mediator. Relfection: This source again is very useful for me. It gave me more ideas about how I would want tot each my students about Fake News by having the little red flags and tips at the bottom of the page. It goes into more detail on the surface of the article and I like that. It has shown me even more what to look out for when trying to spot Fake News. All three of my sources together can make me a powerhouse Fake News detector! Which is great because that is what I want my students to be too.

    2. Summary: This text was originally a picture provided by Facebook to help it's users spot Fake News. I really like it because it appeals to a wide-range of people. It helps young teenagers understand what Fake News can look like and gives adults a good, basic, overview of what Fake News can look like. I believe this past election season prompted Facebook to educate its users about Fake News since now, more than ever, people use Facebook to learn about the news, and consequentially, express their ideas. Assessment: This is most definitley a useful source. I appreciate how it shows me pictures with each tip it gives. It's language iss also very clear and understandable. Everything here is more black and white except for the last two tips which can be harder for people to figure out, but still just as important. This information is reliable, it came from Educators Technology.com and was put on Facebook, so it had to go through all their people as well. This source is a good templete for me to base off how I would teach Fake News to my students with Disabilities. Reflection: This source was the first one that really showed me the indicators of fake news. It is mostly about what one can see to identify Fake News, but it is super helpful. These obvious characteristics are what I can first teach my students with disabilities. The last two tips will be harder, but are necessary. Students need to know about Satire and how some people just write lies for a living, for the clicks.

    1. Summary: I really like this source because it provides amore in-depth analysis of Fake News Stories than my first article does. This source, just like the other ones I am showing for my annotated bibliography are all educational. (I think going over this again is not imperative.) Assessment: Everything I highlighted in yellow is something I believe might be more tricky to teach/talk to students with Disabilities about. This does not mean they are bad (they are actually great ideas to take in) I just have to think about how one can teach that information. What I highlighted in blue are tips the author said that I really appreciated and believe that a lot of people do not think about. I think people who are educated in a way about the fact that Fake News is out there would like this source. I see people who activley share Fake News everyday and there is no way this source would get them to see that all the news they know of is Fake. They would get really angry. That is why me educating my students about Fake News is so important! I think tis source seems less biased because in "Does teh story attach a generic enemy?" it includes the both the Liberal and Conservative side. Being liberal myself, I have been awre of mostly only Conservative Fake News that attacks liberals. Reflection: This source is a great addition for me because it gives me a more detailed lense through which to examine Fake News. It talks about points that rely on one's emotion as well as the actual writing. It gets to points that may are really important and go beyond the surface of a Fake News article.

  7. Apr 2017
  8. Mar 2017
    1. Fundamentally, these efforts miss because what’s needed is not an understanding of news but of the web.

      Why today, digital/web literacy is more important than plain old info/news literacy.

    1. Outrage will fall victim to its own ubiquity.

      Considering this for my tombstone.

    2. I think it’s important not to dismiss the president’s reply simply as dumb. We ought to assume that it’s darkly brilliant — if not in intention then certainly in effect.

      Yes, in the end it doesn't matter if Trump has the overt intention of eroding the value of facts if his actions have that effect.

    3. His objection is to objectivity itself.

      This is a core issue: not just disagreeing about facts, but disagreeing that facts even exist, locating "the truth" in the understanding of "you and I", the "common people", despite that there's no guarantee that our understandings are accurate.

  9. Feb 2017
  10. Jan 2017
    1. The United States is seeing both a chronic and an acute new version of this public-information problem. The chronic version, recognized but nowhere close to being solved, is the rise of separate fact-universes into which different segments of society silo themselves—occurring at the same time as the “normal” news media are struggling against economic and other pressures.The acute version is the emergence as president-elect of a man whose nature as a liar is outside what our institutions are designed to deal with. Donald Trump either cannot tell the difference between truth and lies, or he knows the difference but does not care. Tiniest example: On a single day during the campaign, Trump claimed that the National Football League had sent him a letter complaining that the presidential-debate schedule conflicted with NFL games (which the NFL immediately denied), and then he said the Koch brothers had begged him to accept their donations (which they also flat-out denied).
    1. Han har nok rett. Dette er idiotisk fra de korrupte i disse tjenestene. NRK deler igjen nyhetsbyråenes propaganda.

  11. Dec 2016
    1. Poe’s law also played a prominent role in Facebook’s fake news problem, particularly in the spread of articles written with the cynical intention of duping Trump supporters through fabrication and misinformation. Readers may have passed these articles along as gospel because they really did believe, for example, that an FBI agent investigating Hillary Clinton’s private email server died mysteriously. Or maybe they didn’t believe it but wanted to perpetuate the falsehood for a laugh, out of boredom, or simply to watch the world burn. Each motive equally possible, each equally unverifiable, and each normalizing and incentivizing the spread of outright lies.

      Both Vectors

      Fake news was spread by both people who believed it and people who thought it was funny. Interestingly, it was spread on both vectors simultaneously.

      Poe’s law also played a prominent role in Facebook’s fake news problem, particularly in the spread of articles written with the cynical intention of duping Trump supporters through fabrication and misinformation. Readers may have passed these articles along as gospel because they really did believe, for example, that an FBI agent investigating Hillary Clinton’s private email server died mysteriously. Or maybe they didn’t believe it but wanted to perpetuate the falsehood for a laugh, out of boredom, or simply to watch the world burn. Each motive equally possible, each equally unverifiable, and each normalizing and incentivizing the spread of outright lies.

      For some purposes it doesn't actually matter whether people believed it or not -- and this is where it gets interesting. The spreading of lies as hoaxes or lies as disinformation both undermine the idea of truth, and, as the author states, the "normalizing and incentivizing of outright lies.

    2. But 2016 was also marked—besieged, even—by Poe’s law, a decade-old internet adage articulated by Nathan Poe, a commentator on a creationism discussion thread. Building on the observation that “real” creationists posting to the forum were often difficult to parse from those posing as creationists, Poe’s law stipulates that online, sincere expressions of extremism are often indistinguishable from satirical expressions of extremism.

      Poe's law states that on the internet satirical expressions of extremism are not distinguishable from real expressions of extremism. A good example of this is how fake news (hoaxes) led to fake news (disinformation).

      Poe's Law is also why categorizing disinformation as disinfomation is hard. We actually don't know the intent. We just know it is not true, manufactured out of whole cloth.