286 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
  2. bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. evers and leverage points fortransformative changeOur assessment—the most comprehensive car-ried out to date, including the nexus analysisof scenarios and an expert input process withliterature reviews—revealed clearly that re-versing nature’s ongoing decline (100) whilealso addressing inequality will require trans-formative change, namely a fundamental,system-wide reorganization across techno-logical, economic, and social factors, makingsustainability the norm rather than the altru-istic exception.

      Transformative change is required across all aspects of society. With such short time windows, leverage points become critical.

  3. Jun 2022
  4. bafybeiccxkde65wq2iwuydltwmfwv733h5btvyrzqujyrt5wcfjpg4ihf4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeiccxkde65wq2iwuydltwmfwv733h5btvyrzqujyrt5wcfjpg4ihf4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. Designing policy for climate change requires analyses which integrate the interrelationshipbetween the economy and the environment. We argue that, despite their dominance in theeconomics literature and influence in public discussion and policymaking, the methodologyemployed by Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) rests on flawed foundations, which becomeparticularly relevant in relation to the realities of the immense risks and challenges of climatechange, and the radical changes in our economies that a sound and effective response require. Weidentify a set of critical methodological problems with the IAMs which limit their usefulness anddiscuss the analytic foundations of an alternative approach that is more capable of providinginsights into how best to manage the transition to net-zero emissions

      The claim of this paper is that the current (2022) Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) used by IPCC and therefore policymakers is inadequate due to shortcomings in predicting risk. The paper offers the analytic foundations for an alternative model.

  5. May 2022
    1. I explore how moves towards ‘objective’ data as the basis for decision-making orientated teachers’ judgements towards data in ways that worked to standardise judgement and exclude more multifaceted, situated and values-driven modes of professional knowledge that were characterised as ‘human’ and therefore inevitably biased.

      But, aren't these multifaceted, situated, and values-driven modes also constituted of data? Isn't everything represented by data? Even 'subjective' understanding of the world is articulated as data.

      Is there some 'standard' definition of data that I'm not aware of in the context of this domain?

    2. Frequent testing to monitor children’s ‘expected progress’ through a tightly defined curriculum reflects a limited view of how children learn, in which children are seen as “functional machines” who should all automatically progress at the same rate (Llewellyn, 2016).

      This seems like an over-reach. There's nothing about testing that inherently implies that students 'should' progress at the same rate.

  6. Apr 2022
  7. Feb 2022
    1. Meaghan Kall. (2022, February 17). BA.2 risk assessment New this week is upgrading Immune Evasion—Amber 🟨 from low to moderate that BA.2 is antigentically different to BA.1 Unsurprising given the mutation profile, with BA.2 slightly more immune evasive than BA.1 on neuts studies https://t.co/n6DWtiRaNH [Tweet]. @kallmemeg. https://twitter.com/kallmemeg/status/1494100170195312646

  8. Jan 2022
    1. Assessment of the environmental impacts of conservation practices for reporting at the regional and national scales. • �Continue CEAP activities designed to estimate environmental benefits of conservation practices and programs. • �Develop a framework for reporting impacts of conservation practices and programs in terms of ecosystem services. • �Identify future conservation requirements and provide information for setting national and regional priorities. • �Expand assessment capabilities to address potential impacts of changes in agricultural land use and policy and define necessary conservation programs to meet new environmental challenges brought about by alternative land use or policy changes.
    2. Three principal themes will guide CEAP investments and activities in the future (Maresch et al. 2008): 1. �Research addressing effective and efficient implementation of conservation practices and programs to meet environmental goals and enhance environmental quality. • �Continue and expand CEAP research projects on the effects and benefits of conservation practices for soil and water quality at the watershed and landscape scales. • �Implement a new research and assessment initiative for grazing lands designed to provide scientific evidence for implementation of conservation practices at the landscape scale. • �Determine the critical processes and attributes to be measured at the appropriate landscape position for evaluation of environmental benefits. • �Expand the scope of assessment to include evaluation of a full suite of ecosystem services influenced by conservation practices and programs.
    3. CEAP products would have wide utility for diverse stakeholders within the conservation community. CEAP has evolved into an assessment and research initiative directed at determining not only the impacts of conservation practices, but also evaluating procedures to more effectively manage agricultural landscapes in order to address environmental quality goals at local, regional, and national scales (Maresch et al. 2008).
    1. The USDA engaged the Soil and Water Conservation Society in 2005 to assemble a panel of university scientists and conservation community leaders to recommend the most effective, proactive, and scientifically credible CEAP activities—thereby ensuring that
    2. A secondary goal of CEAP is to establish a framework for assessing and reporting the full suite of ecosystem services impacted by various conservation practices. Ecosystem services represent the benefits that ecological processes convey to human societies and the natural environment. For example, agricultural lands provide flood and drought mitigation, water and air purification, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, and aesthetics and recreation, in addition to the primary agricultural commodities produced. These ecosystem services are often taken for granted and unpriced or underpriced by the marketplace. Research and assessment activities will be integrated within CEAP to provide a scientific foundation for assessing the extent to which ecosystem services are enhanced by conservation practices and programs.
    3. quality of managed lands. CEAP is focused on establishing principles to guide cost-effective conservation practices at landscape scales and to achieve multiple environmental quality goals by placing specified conservation practices or combinations of complementary practices at appropriate locations on the landscape to maximize their effectiveness. CEAP is also developing science-based guidance, information, and decision support tools to determine the appropriate practices to be implemented at various locations on the landscape and to provide conservation program managers with a blueprint for delivery of science-based and cost-effective conservation programs (Duriancik et al. 2008).
    1. The Conservation Effects Assessment (Mausbach and Dedrick 2004). Project (CEAP) is a unique, multiagency effort designed to quantify conservation effects and to determine how conservation practices can be most effectively designed and implemented to protect and enhance environmental quality (Duriancik et al. CeaP Goals The primary goal of CEAP is to strengthen the scientific foundation underpinning conservation programs to protect and enhance environmental Rangelands represent non-cultivated, non-forested land that is extensively managed with ecological principles. (Photo: David Briske) 2008). CEAP was jointly initiated in 2003 by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in partnership with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) in response to requests from Congress and the Office of Management and Budget for greater accountability to US taxpayers following a near doubling of US Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation program funding in the 2002 Farm Bill. These funds are allocated to multiple conservation practices through several USDA-sponsored conservation programs, including the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, Wetlands Reserve Program, Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, Conservation Reserve Program, and NRCS Conservation Technical Assistance Program. This funding increase was concomitant with substantial modifications to
    1. These used to be part of a reward system

      "Rewards" are extrinsic motivators - like the carrot and the stick. Make every session an Awesome Gym Day and let Ss reward themselves by achieving goals they set for themselves. Give them some autonomy and be patient with those who just want to play. They need time.

    2. fun, fairness, and challenge

      Fun, fairness, and challenge could inform the development of three standards with students that could be used to structure their PE sessions. Ask them how do you measure fun? How do you measure fairness: How do you measrue challenge? If they participate in the development of standards, they will be more interested in using them as a guide to improvement - have more fun, play more fairly, ramp up the challenge.

    3. My students do not arrive in the gym thinking about how their performance will be evaluated.

      If they are focused on improving something - like catching - then they should come with the intention of working on that. PE class is not recess. They should have fun, but if they are not focused on anything other than having fun, then they will not be able to improve in any substantive way and it will be impossible to provide any coaching that might lead to that.

    4. They will demonstrate the art of the catch. Their art of the catch.

      Similar problems in language and writing instruction. Ss want to show off their skills and to experiment and do things their own way. That is fine - accomplished writers do this all the time Shakespeare made up hundreds of words. We are not all Shakespeare though - we can make up words in specific contexts, but in writing instruction, the goal is to master common forms and structures before moving on to display personal creativity, yet, even within common forms, there is room for personal creativity. When assessing in this way, it is important to focus on the standards and what those mean in terms of performance - otherwise, be become bogged down and unable to provide clear, consistent, and actional feedback that can lead to improvement in performance.

    5. there are thousands of pieces that I miss

      All performances are complex, and when coaching, it is impossible to attend to every minute detail. Formative assessment - active coaching - is individualized feedback to improve overall performance. Evaluating that performance, is to focus on the performance as a whole.

    6. “performance'' because I teach physical education

      I think a performance focus in important in a lot of fields because, ultimately, education is about what folks are able to do. Knowledge of things is not useful until it is applied to some problem or task. A performance focus could improve assessment across the board and shift teachers away from merely testing "content".

    7. address both the process of learning as well as the performance or outcome

      Assessment of process is commonly formative; while assessment of performance outcome is often summative, though formative assessments do look at performance outcomes too - from the perspective of informing improvement.

    8. what useful things I could say about assessment that wouldn’t expose me as a fraud

      Imposter syndrom is common as people move into more specialized fields. It's common to hear about it from PhD candidates and from PhDs.

    1. Second, although we investigated the effects of formative feedback on students’ metacognitive skills when using feedback strategies with polling systems, we are not able to answer the question how feedback strategies affect student learning. Future research studies should provide understanding which mechanisms behind feedback strategies are responsible for affecting metacognition and must teachers get insight to design effective formative assessments to promote deeper learning.

  9. Dec 2021
    1. you know, I liked the results very much

      That feeling of self satisfaction is a happy end per se. I think it is a characteristic of rewilding if you are looking to assess that.

    1. Evaluating poetry by heritage

      தண்ணீரும் காவிரியே தார்வேந்தன் சோழனே மண்ணாவ துஞ்சோழ மண்டலமே - பெண்ணாவாள் அம்பொற் சிலம்பி யரவிந்தத் தாளணியுஞ் செம்பொற் சிலம்பே சிலம்பு.

      பொருள் :-

      வற்றாதது காவிரி ஆறு. சோழமன்னனே மன்னருள் சிறந்தோன். சோழநாடே நிலவளம் மிகுந்தது. அம்பர் என்னும் கிராமத்தில் வாழும் சிலம்பியே பெண் என்று சொல்லத்தக்கவள் ஆவாள்.

    1. Once we introduce evaluation into our learning spaces, we change the way we interact with student work.

      Evaluation is not the same as feedback. Evaluation is almost always directed at unsolicited advice. Feedback may praise or criticize, but usually seeks value in something.

  10. Nov 2021
    1. assessment, 
      1. Tracking and assessment of students’ progress and assessment during the pandemic online education.
    2. assessment
      1. Tracking and assessment of students’ progress and assessment during the pandemic online education
  11. Oct 2021
    1. It is also important to recognize that high-stakes tests are not race-neutral tools capable of promoting racial equality. At their origins more than 100 years ago, standardized tests were used as weapons against communities of color, immigrants, and the poor. Because they were presumed to be objective, test results were used to “prove” that whites, the rich, and the U.S.-born were biologically more intelligent than non-whites, the poor, and immigrants. In turn, the tests provided backing to early concepts of aptitude and IQ, which were then used to justify the race, class, and cultural inequalities of the time.
    1. negative impacts of the use of standardized assessments
    2. Our present-day assessment instruments used by states to measure student achievement are almost invariably developed to measure student content knowledge on a unidimensional scale—a lasting byproduct of the early efforts to order people on an intelligence scale.
  12. Sep 2021
  13. Aug 2021
  14. Jul 2021
    1. Gargano, J. W., Wallace, M., Hadler, S. C., Langley, G., Su, J. R., Oster, M. E., Broder, K. R., Gee, J., Weintraub, E., Shimabukuro, T., Scobie, H. M., Moulia, D., Markowitz, L. E., Wharton, M., McNally, V. V., Romero, J. R., Talbot, H. K., Lee, G. M., Daley, M. F., & Oliver, S. E. (2021). Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine After Reports of Myocarditis Among Vaccine Recipients: Update from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, June 2021. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 70(27), 977–982. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7027e2

  15. Jun 2021
    1. Unless their self-assessments have power—either to shape future learning activities, or to change the gradebook—they will not be true self-assessments.

      I want to disagree with this and argue that we should be crafting lessons which allow students to understand the different forms of power which are in play in self-assessment and assessment by others. I appreciate, though, that grades may have too many advantages for that lesson to really take within the context of a course.

  16. May 2021
    1. She reminded us of the challenging but extremely important truth that there are some things as instructors and even administrators that are absolutely within our control when it comes to improving equity

      I feel like many of us can relate to this! Equity is uncomfortable, it can be silencing. This reminds me of some Brene Brown (https://debbiedonsky.com/embracing-discomfort-in-equity-work-lessons-from-brene-brown-on-shame-triggers-from-an-anti-oppression-lens/) writings on diving into equitable work. Anti-oppression work requires people to feel deeply and sometimes uncomfortable - as long as they are learning from that discomfort.

    2. We need to first understand how systems of power and oppression influence how students experience college, engage with the learning process, and build knowledge before we can understand how to better assess their learning.

      Power and oppression exist in our interactions with students everyday in our instructor/student relationship. This is one of the many reasons I try to be aware and reflection on my privilege everyday in lessons, marking and conversations. Reflection on power and oppression is ongoing and we need to be mindful of this in our leadership positions.

  17. Apr 2021
    1. This article is ostensibly a response to the use of proctoring software in higher education.

      But in order to do that properly the author has also delved into learning and assessment.

      It's a well-written piece that questions some of our taken-for-granted assumptions around assessment.

  18. Mar 2021
    1. Est-ce que je peux être dispensé de la Piscine, puisque je l’ai déjà fait dans un autre campus de 42? Malheureusement, il n’est pas possible de transférer votre dossier vers 42 Québec et d’être dispensé de l’étape de la Piscine. Il faut la refaire à Québec.
  19. Feb 2021
  20. Jan 2021
    1. In fact, such small effectively closed scientific communities built on interpersonal relationships already exist to some extent

      so the weights in the reputation graph are personal knowledge, not citations or whatever.

  21. Dec 2020
    1. Therefore, it could be argued that belief regarding the usefulness of technologies could lead to change and ultimately the actual use of digital technologies in teaching and learning.

      This goes both ways. A teacher who believes that their job is to control access to specialised information, and to control assessment may use technology to close down learning opportunities (e.g. by banning the use of Wikipedia, YouTube, etc.) and even insisting on the installation of surveillance (proctoring) software on students' personal computers.

      Again, you can argue that technology in itself doesn't make the difference.

  22. Nov 2020
    1. The study found positive impact on student achievement and on the learning experience,

      This seems important: assessment is (ideally) a medium through which learners receive feedback on what they know and are able to do. What if assessment is also a (conscious) feedback loop on the learning experience itself AND perhaps even a source of positive impact regarding the learning experience?

    2. Assessment, if not done with equity in mind, privileges and validates certain types of learning and evidence of learning over others, can hinder the validation of multiple means of demonstration, and can reinforce within students the false notion that they do not belong

      When we privilege certain types of assessment, we necessarily exclude others, and this will often have result of privileging and excluding certain assessment takers.

  23. Oct 2020
    1. proctored, multiple-choice tests are necessary to prepare students to take other multiple-choice assessments they may encounter in the course of their education

      Important point. We design not only courses, but programs, and they relate to experiences after the program.

  24. Sep 2020
    1. students basically just stopped doing the reading

      In addition, there are also some interesting strategies for getting students to do the reading. See Reading Engagement Strategies, for example.

  25. Aug 2020
  26. Jul 2020
    1. Keeping Assessment Relevant and "Authentic"

      Never answer questions, why are we learning this?

      Real world applications built into learning targets

      Grades based on performance versus memorization of formulas and facts

      Authentic Assessment: measures student learning according to the application of skills during the performance of a real-world task

      Reenacting historical acts

      Let students demonstrate knowledge by doing

      1. Challenging
      2. Results in a performance or product
      3. Encourages real-world applications
      4. Self-evaluation
      5. Collaborate, discuss, and receive feedback on work

      Rubric

      I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand

    2. Keeping Assessment Relevant and "Authentic"

      Authentic Assessment: designed to hit skills and needs of population Why did we get to the right answer; what was the process? What were the steps? What are common mistakes? Take mistake and throw it back into class a few days later Give incorrect answers and have them break down the thought process Connect to real life; hands-on, experiential learning Side coaching as assessment Anticipate problems Make tasks authentic to real world tasks Process v. product Use assessment as a teaching tool!

    1. Defining Formative Assessment

      Yes! Formative assessment should not just be for grade's sake, but as an actual way to gauge student understanding and then to assess the next steps to take to get students to where you want them to be

  27. Jun 2020