35 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Quinney et al. (2008 Quinney, A., Hutchings, M. and Scammell, J. 2008. Student and staff experiences of using a virtual community, Wessex Bay, to support interprofessional learning: messages for collaborative practice. Social Work Education, 27(6): 658–664. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]), writing about the development of a virtual town called Wessex Bay, describe how a blended learning approach allowed collaboration to take place between dispersed communities of practitioners, cross-disciplinary student groups, and tutors using bulletin boards, discussion forums and face-to-face interactions. Using evolving case studies they were able to collaboratively develop the skills of problem-solving and case analysis within an authentic community of practice. West (2008 West, J. 2008. Authentic voices: utilising audio and video within an online virtual community. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 27(6): 665–670. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar])
    2. A course design that optimises student engagement and moves away from a purely didactic approach should also encourage learning that has enquiry at its heart. Examples include encouraging interdisciplinary student groups to seek solutions to problem-based case studies. Savin-Baden (2000 Savin-Baden, M. 2000. Problem-based Learning in Higher Education: Untold Stories, Buckingham: SRHE and Open University Press.  [Google Scholar]) argues the processes of ‘learning by doing’ in these situations can provide learners with opportunities to gain experiences of collaborative working.
    3. Garrison and Vaughan (2008 Garrison, D. R. and Vaughan, N. D. 2008. Blended Learning in Higher Education: Framework, Principles, and Guidelines, 1st edn, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.  [Google Scholar]) state that effective blended learning requires educators to incorporate the following three key elements into the learning design process:•thoughtfully integrating face-to-face and online learning;•fundamentally rethinking the course design to optimise student engagement;•restructuring and replacing traditional class contact hours. (Garrison and Vaughan, 2008 Garrison, D. R. and Vaughan, N. D. 2008. Blended Learning in Higher Education: Framework, Principles, and Guidelines, 1st edn, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.  [Google Scholar], p. 5)
    4. Work at CEIMH suggests that web-based technologies can help to overcome some of these practical difficulties and bring learners from different disciplines together (Skorga, 2002 Skorga, P. 2002. Interdisciplinary and distance education in the Delta: the Delta Health Education Partnership. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 16(2): 149–157. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]; Juntunen and Heikkinen, 2004 Juntunen, A. and Heikkinen, E. 2004. Lessons from interprofessional e-learning: piloting a care of the elderly module. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 18(3): 269–278. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]). Using the asynchronous collaborative properties these technologies present within a blended learning design has enabled us to help educators create new virtual spaces for meaningful interdisciplinary learning to take place (Miers et al., 2007 Miers, M., Clarke, B., Pollard, C., Rickaby, C., Thomas, J. and Turtle, A. 2007. Online interprofessional learning: the student experience. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 21(5): 529–542. [Crossref], [PubMed], , [Google Scholar]; Reynolds, 2007 Reynolds, J. 2007. Discourses of inter-professionalism. British Journal of Social Work, 37(3): 441–457.  [Google Scholar]; Quinney et al., 2008 Quinney, A., Hutchings, M. and Scammell, J. 2008. Student and staff experiences of using a virtual community, Wessex Bay, to support interprofessional learning: messages for collaborative practice. Social Work Education, 27(6): 658–664. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]).
    5. This paper seeks to address this dearth in the literature by outlining how the Centre of Excellence in Interdisciplinary Mental Health (CEIMH) created a set of resources to guide educators through the processes of creating interdisciplinary enquiry-based blended learning designs (EBBL). The context and rationale for the development of a Blended Learning Design Planner and associated Resource Pack, and Design Icons are outlined.
    6. In social work education, blended learning, a mixture of face-to-face and online interactions enabling collaborative and interactive learning, has been increasingly used as a curriculum strategy and provides the basic ingredients required to facilitate interdisciplinary teaching and learning opportunities (Cooner and Hickman, 2008 Cooner, T. S. and Hickman, G. 2008. Child protection teaching: students' experiences of a blended learning design. Social Work Education, 27(6): 647–657. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]; Quinney et al., 2008 Quinney, A., Hutchings, M. and Scammell, J. 2008. Student and staff experiences of using a virtual community, Wessex Bay, to support interprofessional learning: messages for collaborative practice. Social Work Education, 27(6): 658–664. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]; West, 2008 West, J. 2008. Authentic voices: utilising audio and video within an online virtual community. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 27(6): 665–670. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]; Pack, 2010 Pack, M. 2010. Allies in learning: critical-reflective practice on-line with allied mental health practitioners. Social Work Education, 29(1): 67–79. [Taylor & Francis Online], , [Google Scholar]; Cooner, 2010 Cooner, T. S. (2010) ‘Creating opportunities for students in large cohorts to reflect in and on practice: lessons learnt from a formative evaluation of students’ experiences of a technology-enhanced blended learning design’, British Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 271–286 [Google Scholar]).
    1. The academic benefit, evidence, and competitive advantages are clear; only the will and commitment remains. Blended learning can begin the necessary process of redefining higher education institutions as being learning centered and facilitating a higher learning experience.
    2. There are a variety of possible explanations for these outcomes. In essence, though, we assert that it begins by questioning the dominance of the lecture in favor of more active and meaningful learning activities and tasks.
    3. There is evidence that blended learning has the potential to be more effective and efficient when compared to a traditional classroom model Heterick & Twigg, 2003, Twigg, 2003. The evidence is that students achieve as well, or better, on exams and are satisfied with the approach.
    4. The emphasis must shift from assimilating information to constructing meaning and confirming understanding in a community of inquiry. This process is about discourse that challenges accepted beliefs, which is rarely accomplished by students in isolation. At the same time, to be a critical thinker is to take control of one's thought processes and gain a metacognitive understanding of these processes (i.e., learn to learn). A blended learning context can provide the independence and increased control essential to developing critical thinking. Along with the increased control that a blended learning context encourages is a scaffolded acceptance of responsibility for constructing meaning and understanding.
    5. The real test of blended learning is the effective integration of the two main components (face-to-face and Internet technology) such that we are not just adding on to the existing dominant approach or method. This holds true whether it be a face-to-face or a fully Internet-based learning experience. A blended learning design represents a significant departure from either of these approaches. It represents a fundamental reconceptualization and reorganization of the teaching and learning dynamic, starting with various specific contextual needs and contingencies (e.g., discipline, developmental level, and resources).

      definition of blended learning that emphasizes the importance of integration between face to face and online - a reconceptualization and reorganization of pedagogy

    6. Blended learning is both simple and complex. At its simplest, blended learning is the thoughtful integration of classroom face-to-face learning experiences with online learning experiences. There is considerable intuitive appeal to the concept of integrating the strengths of synchronous (face-to-face) and asynchronous (text-based Internet) learning activities. At the same time, there is considerable complexity in its implementation with the challenge of virtually limitless design possibilities and applicability to so many contexts.
    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. Instructor-Led Training

      SharedBook.com published this article about the state of Instructor-Led Training (ILT) in 2018. It claims that technology has not caused instructor-led training demand to decrease, but instead as simply altered it to provide instructors with new tools. It is important to note how technology changes the delivery of ILT, because now trainers are able to reach more people in a variety of places, and have far more at their fingertips to help facilitate training than they did before technology became so pervasive. Technology also helps with assessing learner outcomes, as it provides more analytical tools. Hybrid ILT is also becoming more common as a super-training platform that combines strengths of E-learning with ILT. It is important, however, to ensure technology is used purposefully in technology-heavy ILT environments. 9/10

    1. Effective Integration of Technology and Instructor-Led Training to Promote Soft Skills Mastery

      The Access Technologies Group published this article to discuss purposeful use of technology in ILT environments whose goal was to teach soft skills. The article claims that blended learning is the ideal delivery technique because it provides the ease of e-learning with the face-to-face time necessary to develop soft skills. It is critical to the success of the training program to integrate e-learning and ILT seamlessly to ensure the two produce synergy without limiting themselves or each other. It is also important that the learners are provided with an environment that suits their learning needs best. Technology and ILT can both provide ways to meet those needs, and where one lacks, the other can fill in. 8/10

    1. The Benefits of Instructor-Led Training

      This web page, published by SkillJar, discusses the importance of instructor-led training: the immediacy and warmth of a human that provides excellent experience for learners that they value highly. It is important to use these strengths to the trainer's advantage when designing and delivering training because it makes the training more effective. 5/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

  2. Feb 2019
    1. to expand their pedagogical repertoire

      Indeed. Just as it requires knowledge and skill to design, develop, and deliver an online learning experience, the same applies to blended learning. Making informed decisions about how to blend is deep, deep, deep.

  3. Nov 2018
    1. Learning Design Process

      The Royal Roads University has created this useful site that offers support and assistance in the design and development of curriculum. What I found to be very useful is the support dedicated for Moodle, the online curriculum software as I have recently signed up for the site.

      The methodology used by the University is focused on an outcomes approach with integration of pedagogical and technological elements and blended learning.

      The site has a research link and the kb was excellent. I was very pleased to have found this resource.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  4. Sep 2018
  5. May 2018
    1. This study examines publically available guides, documents, and books that espouse best or effective practices in blended course design to determine commonalities among such practices. A qualitative meta-analysis reveals common principles regarding the design process, pedagogical strategies, classroom and online technology utilization, assessment strategies, and course implementation and student readiness

      Meta study that looks at best practices for blended courses with respect to design, pedagogy, implementation and student readiness.

  6. Mar 2018
  7. Jan 2018
    1. Blended Learning is optimal because it supports multiple perspectives and experiences which are easily accessible over the web
    2. In 1896 one of the Olympic founders, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, proposed the idea for a unified motto and symbol to reflect the unified International Community.

      Who was Baron Pierre de Coubertin?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cn6FYNS6dg

  8. Oct 2017
    1. In this FLT article, I am introducing a new pedagogy I call the Pedagogy of Retrieval. This is the pedagogy I use to try to interrupt the automatic use of lower potential learning strategies in my flipped classrooms at The University of Texas at Austin, and it is built on the collective body of research and efforts of my colleagues mentioned above.
  9. Jun 2017
  10. www.edx.org www.edx.org
    1. The central objectiveof this pilot was to examinehow adaptation ofthe new MIT edX 6.002x (Electronics and Circuits) MOOC-contentin a flipped model of teaching mightimprove student learning in a credit-bearing college course. Multiple objectives for this pilot included: (1) improve thedepartment’s typicalpassage rate of 59%for this course; (2)improve students’ retention rate; (3) shorten students’ time-to-degree; (4) improve the quality of the content of the course; and (5) reducethe prerequisite contribution for successful passageof subsequent courses.

      This paper summarizes a pilot at San Jose State, using an MIT edX circuits course to facilitate a blended learning approach. Students completed the MOOC materials ahead of class and then class sessions consisted of 1) mental ramp up 2) mini-review lecture 3) group quiz 4) group quiz solution 5) individual quiz 6) solution for individual quiz 7) preview of next session.

  11. Feb 2017
  12. Sep 2016
    1. The queue of electronic hands could take so long to get through that some students abandoned hope and lowered their hands while others got into the habit of raising their hand pre-emptively just so they’d have a spot in line if an idea came into their head later on.
  13. Mar 2016
    1. Most recently I have been learning from two new-to-me online communities of practice – Wattpad for Writers and DeviantArt for Artists. Their online designs and supportive networked ways of working prompt me to continue thinking about the power of open ways of working in such communities.

      So powerful to look at people engaged in networked learning "in the wild" in order to design interest-driven learning in classroom settings.

      I like to think of this type of experiment as a form of "blended learning," where you're blending elements of 3rd space learning into formal schooling.

  14. Jan 2016
  15. Aug 2015
    1. Flexibility

      Some connection with SAMR, unbundling, “open learning”… With diverse learners whose constraints may affect institutions, there’s a fair bit of talk about new(ish) tech-infused approaches to distance education. As with many other things, not much of it is new. But there might be some enabling phenomena. Not sure how gamification fits, here. Sure, open play could allow for a lot of flexibility. But gamification is pretty much the reverse: game mechanics without the open-ended playfulness.