11 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2021
  2. Jul 2021
    1. Play may trump problem solving. When working on a problem without a specific goal, the student can try lots of things to figure out what works. In contrast, only one answer is needed to solve a problem with a single goal. A playful, exploratory mindset may map out the patterns of interactions better than a narrowly, solution-oriented perspective. As an example of this, Sweller asked students to solve some math problems. One group was asked to solve the problems for a particular variable, and the other group was asked to solve for as many variables as they could. The latter group did better later, which Sweller explained in terms of cognitive load.4

      exploratory play >> problem solving

      How does this compare to the creativity experience of naming white things in general versus naming white things in a refrigerator? The first is often harder for people, while the second is usually much easier.

  3. Oct 2020
    1. The educator’s role in self-directed learning

      Fostering self-directed learning through strategy is discussed by Bailey et al. (2019) in chapter 1 of “Self-Directed Learning for the 21st Century: Implications for Higher Education.” The authors review the changing role of the educator and the learner based on respective self-directed teaching strategies (problem-based learning, cooperative learning, process-oriented learning) and the learner’s propensity for self-directed learning. In addition to providing principles to promote self-directed learning, the Grow and Borich models for implementing said learning were briefly reviewed. 8/10

    1. Creativity, Self-Directed Learning and the Architecture of Technology Rich Environments

      (Click Download full-text PDF to read). In this article, the authors reflect on the need to cultivate creativity and self-directed learning through transition from conventional course design to a more comprehensive design, which includes technology, problem solving, and collaboration. Moreover, the authors contend that measures of success should not be limited to traditional assessment methods. Barriers to the success of a self-directed design within the typical learning environment are mentioned. Through case study review, the authors demonstrate that strategic course design (educator, setting, technology, expectations) fosters development of the self-directed learner. Dynamics supporting the success of the technology-rich, creative, self-directed design were included. With a methodological approach that incorporates technology, problem-solving, teamwork, and educator support, self-directed behaviors emerge.(8/10)

    1. Features and characteristics of problem based learning

      The problem based learning (PBL) strategy is defined. The strategy is defined as an iterative process with specific goals (knowledge, problem-solving skills, self-directed skills, collaboration, motivation for learning). The authors go on to describe the advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and considerations for the use of PBL. Integration of technology allows for new opportunities in education and training across disciplines. (7/10)

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

  4. Nov 2019
    1. Problem-based learning (PBL) in a growing trend in approaching adult learning, particularly in ESL/ELL classrooms. In this text, the basic principles and methods of PBL for ELL/ESL classes are covered for instructors to implement. Key aspects of PBL include relevance to student lives and the opportunity to practice English in a heterogenous group with the end goal being application to another area of life. Multiple resources are helpful for implementation of PBL including technology. A review of the benefits of PBL is summarized as well as drawbacks with embedded suggestions to resolve possible difficulties. Rating: 8/10

  5. Apr 2019
    1. PBL) isan instructional method in which students lear

      Problem based learning is an instructional method in which students learn through facilitated problem solving. Problem based curricula provide students with guided experience in learning through solving complex, real-world problems. Rating: 9/10

  6. Mar 2019
    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5