24 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. The author, Stefan Hrastinski, is a Professor at the Division of Digital Learning and Director of Research Education at the Department of Learning in Engineering Sciences at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. Hrastinski notes the term "blended learning" originated in the 1990's, but is often over generalized. Hrastinski proposes several blended learning models, blended learning conceptualizations, and proposes recomendations for future research.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. Walmart Academies offers training online as well as in classes and in their stores, for its frontline service workers, covering both retail and soft skills. As part of this work, Walmart offers a video game called Spark City that simulates being a store department manager. Walmart Academies also has partnered with Guild Education to offer higher-level educational opportunities including for-credit college level classes

      A comprehensive guide to blended learning with links to other resources throughout the article. Something that caught my eye was when they talked about Walmart's Spark City, a video game for training managers (pg.13).

      10/10

    1. The authors present a study focused the differences of blended versus traditional instruction in terms of student performance. The study evaluates 53 undergraduate students enrolled in a "Physical Education in Early Childhood" course. Twenty-nine students were placed in a traditional course and 24 students were placed in a blended "experimental" group. The researchers concluded that "students who attended the course with blended instruction show higher performance."

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Blended learning: Efficient, timely and cost effective

      (Click Download full-text PDF to read.) In this article, the authors discuss the blended learning instructional delivery method. Through case study, the authors demonstrate the benefits of blended course design. Furthermore, the article addresses potential detriments (financial, instructional design) of a blended course design. A brief review of considerations and recommendations for a blended design was provided. Though this article focuses on the relationship to forensic science, the information is applicable across disciplines and delivery venues (corporate, academic). (6/10)

    1. Investigating self-directed learning and technology readiness in blending learning environment

      Article primarily deals with blended learning environments and the effectiveness of SDL as leveraged through technology-enabled forms of communication. Other topics addressed include technology readiness and student motivation levels. Findings indicate technology has a positive effect on learning outcomes. Rating 7/10.

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

  2. Nov 2019
  3. Jul 2019
    1. Hanauer (2012) contends that “language learning within these settings is defined overwhelmingly in linguistic, structural, and cognitive terms. Thus the language learner at the center of this system becomes nothing more than an intellectual entity involved in an assessable cognitive process” (p. 105). In this assessable cognitive instruction, students are not afforded the opportunity to use English as a social semiotic tool for expressing their own personal feelings (emotions), opinions, and stories as lived experience as well as for enacting social practices.

  4. Mar 2019
    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. Instructor-Led Training

      SharedBook.com published this article about the state of Instructor-Led Training (ILT) in 2018. It claims that technology has not caused instructor-led training demand to decrease, but instead as simply altered it to provide instructors with new tools. It is important to note how technology changes the delivery of ILT, because now trainers are able to reach more people in a variety of places, and have far more at their fingertips to help facilitate training than they did before technology became so pervasive. Technology also helps with assessing learner outcomes, as it provides more analytical tools. Hybrid ILT is also becoming more common as a super-training platform that combines strengths of E-learning with ILT. It is important, however, to ensure technology is used purposefully in technology-heavy ILT environments. 9/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

  5. Feb 2019
    1. to expand their pedagogical repertoire

      Indeed. Just as it requires knowledge and skill to design, develop, and deliver an online learning experience, the same applies to blended learning. Making informed decisions about how to blend is deep, deep, deep.

  6. Nov 2018
    1. Learning Design Process

      The Royal Roads University has created this useful site that offers support and assistance in the design and development of curriculum. What I found to be very useful is the support dedicated for Moodle, the online curriculum software as I have recently signed up for the site.

      The methodology used by the University is focused on an outcomes approach with integration of pedagogical and technological elements and blended learning.

      The site has a research link and the kb was excellent. I was very pleased to have found this resource.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  7. Sep 2018
  8. Mar 2018
  9. Jan 2018
    1. Blended Learning is optimal because it supports multiple perspectives and experiences which are easily accessible over the web
    2. In 1896 one of the Olympic founders, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, proposed the idea for a unified motto and symbol to reflect the unified International Community.

      Who was Baron Pierre de Coubertin?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cn6FYNS6dg

  10. Feb 2017
  11. Sep 2016
    1. The queue of electronic hands could take so long to get through that some students abandoned hope and lowered their hands while others got into the habit of raising their hand pre-emptively just so they’d have a spot in line if an idea came into their head later on.
  12. Mar 2016
    1. Most recently I have been learning from two new-to-me online communities of practice – Wattpad for Writers and DeviantArt for Artists. Their online designs and supportive networked ways of working prompt me to continue thinking about the power of open ways of working in such communities.

      So powerful to look at people engaged in networked learning "in the wild" in order to design interest-driven learning in classroom settings.

      I like to think of this type of experiment as a form of "blended learning," where you're blending elements of 3rd space learning into formal schooling.

  13. Jan 2016
  14. Aug 2015
    1. Flexibility

      Some connection with SAMR, unbundling, “open learning”… With diverse learners whose constraints may affect institutions, there’s a fair bit of talk about new(ish) tech-infused approaches to distance education. As with many other things, not much of it is new. But there might be some enabling phenomena. Not sure how gamification fits, here. Sure, open play could allow for a lot of flexibility. But gamification is pretty much the reverse: game mechanics without the open-ended playfulness.