405 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Thousands of enterprises around the world have done exhaustive security reviews of our user, network, and data center layers and confidently selected Zoom for complete deployment. 

      This doesn't really account for the fact that Zoom have committed some atrociously heinous acts, such as (and not limited to):

    1. To join the Privacy Shield Framework, a U.S.-based organization is required to self-certify to the Department of Commerce and publicly commit to comply with the Framework’s requirements. While joining the Privacy Shield is voluntary, the GDPR goes far beyond it.
    1. "users are not able to fully understand the extent of the processing operations carried out by Google and that ‘the information on processing operations for the ads personalization is diluted in several documents and does not enable the user to be aware of their extent."
    2. None Of Your Business
    1. This is known as transport encryption, which is different from end-to-end encryption because the Zoom service itself can access the unencrypted video and audio content of Zoom meetings. So when you have a Zoom meeting, the video and audio content will stay private from anyone spying on your Wi-Fi, but it won’t stay private from the company.
    2. But despite this misleading marketing, the service actually does not support end-to-end encryption for video and audio content, at least as the term is commonly understood. Instead it offers what is usually called transport encryption, explained further below
    1. The cookie policy is a section of the privacy policy dedicated to cookies
    2. If a website/app collects personal data, the Data Owner must inform users of this fact by way of a privacy policy. All that is required to trigger this obligation is the presence of a simple contact form, Google Analytics, a cookie or even a social widget; if you’re processing any kind of personal data, you definitely need one.
    1. By choosing Matomo, you are joining an ever growing movement. You’re standing up for something that respects user-privacy, you’re fighting for a safer web and you believe your personal data should remain in your own hands, no one else’s.
    1. Data privacy now a global movementWe’re pleased to say we’re not the only ones who share this philosophy, web browsing companies like Brave have made it possible so you can browse the internet more privately; and you can use a search engine like DuckDuckGo to search with the freedom you deserve.
    2. our values remain the same – advocating for 100% data ownership, respecting user-privacy, being reliable and encouraging people to stay secure. Complete analytics, that’s 100% yours.
    3. the privacy of your users is respected
  2. www.graphitedocs.com www.graphitedocs.com
    1. Own Your Encryption KeysYou would never trust a company to keep a record of your password for use anytime they want. Why would you do that with your encryption keys? With Graphite, you don't have to. You own and manage your keys so only YOU can decrypt your content.
    1. When you think about data law and privacy legislations, cookies easily come to mind as they’re directly related to both. This often leads to the common misconception that the Cookie Law (ePrivacy directive) has been repealed by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which in fact, it has not. Instead, you can instead think of the ePrivacy Directive and GDPR as working together and complementing each other, where, in the case of cookies, the ePrivacy generally takes precedence.
    1. In accordance with the general principles of privacy law, which do not permit the processing of data prior to consent, the cookie law does not allow the installation of cookies before obtaining the user’s consent, except for exempt categories.
    1. the deceptive practices it has been used to shield and enable are on borrowed time. The direction of travel — and the direction of innovation — is pro-privacy, pro-user control and therefore anti-deceptive-design.
    1. provide users with information regarding how to update their browser settings. Many sites provide detailed information for most browsers. You could either link to one of these sites, or create a similar guide of your own. Your guide can either appear in a pop up after a user declines consent, or it can be part of your Privacy Policy, Cookie Information page, or its own separate page.
    1. What information is being collected? Who is collecting it? How is it collected? Why is it being collected? How will it be used? Who will it be shared with? What will be the effect of this on the individuals concerned? Is the intended use likely to cause individuals to object or complain?
    1. If your agreement with Google incorporates this policy, or you otherwise use a Google product that incorporates this policy, you must ensure that certain disclosures are given to, and consents obtained from, end users in the European Economic Area along with the UK. If you fail to comply with this policy, we may limit or suspend your use of the Google product and/or terminate your agreement.
  3. Mar 2020
    1. When joining a Zoom meeting, the "join from your browser" link is intentionally hidden. This browser extension solves this problem by transparently redirecting any meeting links to use Zoom's browser based web client.

      Using this extension means one won't be affected by the tracking that occurs via Zoom's apps for desktop and mobile devices.

    1. The host of a Zoom call has the capacity to monitor the activities of attendees while screen-sharing. This functionality is available in Zoom version 4.0 and higher.

      This is true if one uses the Zoom apps for desktop or mobile devices.

      There is a Chrome extension that redirects Zoom meetings via a web browser.

    1. Legitimate Interest may be used for marketing purposes as long as it has a minimal impact on a data subject’s privacy and it is likely the data subject will not object to the processing or be surprised by it.
    1. Google Analytics created an option to remove the last octet (the last group of 3 numbers) from your visitor’s IP-address. This is called ‘IP Anonymization‘. Although this isn’t complete anonymization, the GDPR demands you use this option if you want to use Analytics without prior consent from your visitors. Some countris (e.g. Germany) demand this setting to be enabled at all times.
    1. A data subject should have the right of access to personal data which have been collected concerning him or her, and to exercise that right easily and at reasonable intervals, in order to be aware of, and verify, the lawfulness of the processing
    2. Every data subject should therefore have the right to know and obtain communication in particular with regard to the purposes for which the personal data are processed, where possible the period for which the personal data are processed, the recipients of the personal data, the logic involved in any automatic personal data processing
    3. Where possible, the controller should be able to provide remote access to a secure system which would provide the data subject with direct access to his or her personal data.
    1. As a condition of use of this site, all users must give permission for CIVIC to use its access logs to attempt to track users who are reasonably suspected of gaining, or attempting to gain, unauthorised access. All log file information collected by CIVIC is kept secure and no access to raw log files is given to any third party.
    2. CIVIC will make no attempt to identify individual users. You should be aware, however, that access to web pages will generally create log entries in the systems of your ISP or network service provider. These entities may be in a position to identify the client computer equipment used to access a page.
    1. Earlier this year it began asking Europeans for consent to processing their selfies for facial recognition purposes — a highly controversial technology that regulatory intervention in the region had previously blocked. Yet now, as a consequence of Facebook’s confidence in crafting manipulative consent flows, it’s essentially figured out a way to circumvent EU citizens’ fundamental rights — by socially engineering Europeans to override their own best interests.
    2. But people clearly do care about privacy. Just look at the lengths to which ad tech entities go to obfuscate and deceive consumers about how their data is being collected and used. If people don’t mind companies spying on them, why not just tell them plainly it’s happening?
    3. The deceitful obfuscation of commercial intention certainly runs all the way through the data brokering and ad tech industries that sit behind much of the ‘free’ consumer Internet. Here consumers have plainly been kept in the dark so they cannot see and object to how their personal information is being handed around, sliced and diced, and used to try to manipulate them.
    4. design choices are being selected to be intentionally deceptive. To nudge the user to give up more than they realize. Or to agree to things they probably wouldn’t if they genuinely understood the decisions they were being pushed to make.
    1. A 1% sample of AddThis Data (“Sample Dataset”) is retained for a maximum of 24 months for business continuity purposes.
    1. The system has been criticised due to its method of scraping the internet to gather images and storing them in a database. Privacy activists say the people in those images never gave consent. “Common law has never recognised a right to privacy for your face,” Clearview AI lawyer Tor Ekeland said in a recent interview with CoinDesk. “It’s kind of a bizarre argument to make because [your face is the] most public thing out there.”
    1. Enligt Polismyndighetens riktlinjer ska en konsekvensbedömning göras innan nya polisiära verktyg införs, om de innebär en känslig personuppgiftbehandling. Någon sådan har inte gjorts för det aktuella verktyget.

      Swedish police have used Clearview AI without any 'consequence judgement' having been performed.

      In other words, Swedish police have used a facial-recognition system without being allowed to do so.

      This is a clear breach of human rights.

      Swedish police has lied about this, as reported by Dagens Nyheter.

    1. The payment provider told MarketWatch that everyone has a unique walk, and it is investigating innovative behavioral biometrics such as gait, face, heartbeat and veins for cutting edge payment systems of the future.

      This is a true invasion into people's lives.

      Remember: this is a credit-card company. We use them to pay for stuff. They shouldn't know what we look like, how we walk, how our hearts beat, nor how our 'vein technology' works.

    1. Right now, if you want to know what data Facebook has about you, you don’t have the right to ask them to give you all of the data they have on you, and the right to know what they’ve done with it. You should have that right. You should have the right to know and have access to your data.
    1. Good data privacy practices by companies are good for the world. We wake up every day excited to change the world and keep the internet that we all know and love safe and transparent.
  4. Feb 2020
    1. Legislation to stem the tide of Big Tech companies' abuses, and laws—such as a national consumer privacy bill, an interoperability bill, or a bill making firms liable for data-breaches—would go a long way toward improving the lives of the Internet users held hostage inside the companies' walled gardens. But far more important than fixing Big Tech is fixing the Internet: restoring the kind of dynamism that made tech firms responsive to their users for fear of losing them, restoring the dynamic that let tinkerers, co-ops, and nonprofits give every person the power of technological self-determination.
    1. Last year, Facebook said it would stop listening to voice notes in messenger to improve its speech recognition technology. Now, the company is starting a new program where it will explicitly ask you to submit your recordings, and earn money in return.

      Given Facebook's history with things like breaking laws that end up with them paying billions of USD in damages (even though it's a joke), sold ads to people who explicitly want to target people who hate jews, and have spent millions of USD every year solely on lobbyism, don't sell your personal experiences and behaviours to them.

      Facebook is nefarious and psychopathic.

    1. The most popular modern secure messaging tool is Signal, which won the Levchin Prize at Real World Cryptography for its cryptographic privacy design. Signal currently requires phone numbers for all its users. It does this not because Signal wants to collect contact information for its users, but rather because Signal is allergic to it: using phone numbers means Signal can piggyback on the contact lists users already have, rather than storing those lists on its servers. A core design goal of the most important secure messenger is to avoid keeping a record of who’s talking to whom. Not every modern secure messenger is as conscientious as Signal. But they’re all better than Internet email, which doesn’t just collect metadata, but actively broadcasts it. Email on the Internet is a collaboration between many different providers; and each hop on its store-and-forward is another point at which metadata is logged. .
    1. Research ethics concerns issues, such as privacy, anonymity, informed consent and the sensitivity of data. Given that social media is part of society’s tendency to liquefy and blur the boundaries between the private and the public, labour/leisure, production/consumption (Fuchs, 2015a: Chapter 8), research ethics in social media research is par-ticularly complex.
    1. I suspect that Wacom doesn’t really think that it’s acceptable to record the name of every application I open on my personal laptop. I suspect that this is why their privacy policy doesn’t really admit that this is what that they do.
  5. Jan 2020
    1. “Privacy in law means various things,” he writes; “and one of the things it means is protection from intrusion.” He argues that in advertising, open performance, and public-address systems, “these may validly be regulated” to prevent porn from being thrust upon the unsuspecting and unwilling. It is an extension of broadcast regulation. And that is something we grapple with still: What is shown to us, whether we want it shown to us, and how it gets there: by way of algorithm or editor or bot. What is our right not to see?

      Privacy as freedom from is an important thing. I like this idea.

    1. Now, Google has to change its practices and prompt users to choose their own default search engine when setting up a European Android device that has the Google Search app built in. Not all countries will have the same options, however, as the choices included in Google’s new prompt all went to the highest bidders.As it turns out, DuckDuckGo must have bid more aggressively than other Google competitors, as it’s being offered as a choice across all countries in the EU.
    1. A Microsoft programme to transcribe and vet audio from Skype and Cortana, its voice assistant, ran for years with “no security measures”, according to a former contractor who says he reviewed thousands of potentially sensitive recordings on his personal laptop from his home in Beijing over the two years he worked for the company.

      Wonderful. This, combined with the fact that Skype users can—fairly easily—find out which contacts another person has, is horrifying.

      Then again, most people know that Microsoft have colluded with American authorities to divulge chat/phone history for a long time, right?

  6. Dec 2019
    1. any protester who brings a phone to a public demonstration is tracked and that person’s presence at the event is duly recorded in commercial datasets. At the same time, political parties are beginning to collect and purchase phone location for voter persuasion.
    2. “Privacy needs to start being seen as a human right.”
    1. I understand that GitHub uses "Not Found" where it means "Forbidden" in some circumstances to prevent inadvertently reveling the existence of a private repository. Requests that require authentication will return 404 Not Found, instead of 403 Forbidden, in some places. This is to prevent the accidental leakage of private repositories to unauthorized users. --GitHub This is a fairly common practice around the web, indeed it is defined: The 404 (Not Found) status code indicates that the origin server did not find a current representation for the target resource or is not willing to disclose that one exists. --6.5.4. 404 Not Found, RFC 7231 HTTP/1.1 Semantics and Content (emphasis mine)
    1. Google found 1,494 device identifiers in SensorVault, sending them to the ATF to comb through. In terms of numbers, that’s unprecedented for this form of search. It illustrates how Google can pinpoint a large number of mobile phones in a brief period of time and hand over that information to the government
    2. Google found 1,494 device identifiers in SensorVault, sending them to the ATF to comb through. In terms of numbers, that’s unprecedented for this form of search. It illustrates how Google can pinpoint a large number of mobile phones in a brief period of time and hand over that information to the government
  7. Nov 2019
    1. Loading this iframe allows Facebook to know that this specific user is currently on your website. Facebook therefore knows about user browsing behaviour without user’s explicit consent. If more and more websites adopt Facebook SDK then Facebook would potentially have user’s full browsing history! And as with “With great power comes great responsibility”, it’s part of our job as developers to protect users privacy even when they don’t ask for.
    1. half of iPhone users don’t know there’s a unique ID on their phone (called an IDFA, for “identifier for advertisers”) tracking their app activity and sending it to third-party advertisers by default.
    1. How you use our services and your devicesThis includes: call records containing phone numbers you call and receive calls from, websites you visit, text records, wireless location, application and feature usage, product and device-specific information and identifiers, router connections, service options you choose, mobile and device numbers, video streaming and video packages and usage, movie rental and purchase data, TV and video viewership, and other similar information.
    2. Demographic and interest dataFor example, this information could include gender, age range, education level, sports enthusiast, frequent diner and other demographics and interests.
    3. Information from social media platformsThis may include interests, "likes" and similar information you permit social media companies to share in this way.
    4. Information from Verizon MediaFor example, we may receive information from Verizon Media to help us understand your interests to help make our advertising more relevant to you.
    5. Learn about the information Verizon collects about you, your devices and your use of products and services we provide. We collect information when you interact with us and use our products and services. The types of information we collect depends on your use of our products and services and the ways that you interact with us. This may include information about: Contact, billing and other information you provide 1 How you use our services and your devices 2 How you use our websites and apps 3 How our network and your devices are working 4 Location of your wireless devices

      Verizon Privacy Policy

    1. Google has confirmed that it partnered with health heavyweight Ascension, a Catholic health care system based in St. Louis that operates across 21 states and the District of Columbia.

      What happened to 'thou shalt not steal'?

    1. Found a @facebook #security & #privacy issue. When the app is open it actively uses the camera. I found a bug in the app that lets you see the camera open behind your feed.

      So, Facebook uses your camera even while not active.

    1. Speaking with MIT Technology Review, Rohit Prasad, Alexa’s head scientist, has now revealed further details about where Alexa is headed next. The crux of the plan is for the voice assistant to move from passive to proactive interactions. Rather than wait for and respond to requests, Alexa will anticipate what the user might want. The idea is to turn Alexa into an omnipresent companion that actively shapes and orchestrates your life. This will require Alexa to get to know you better than ever before.

      This is some next-level onslaught.

    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documentation has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social networking giant.

      I can't even start telling you how much schadenfreude I feel at this. Even though this paints a vulgar picture, Facebook are still doing it, worse and worse.

      Talk about hiding in plain sight.

    1. Clear affirmative action means someone must take deliberate action to opt in, even if this is not expressed as an opt-in box. For example, other affirmative opt-in methods might include signing a consent statement, oral confirmation, a binary choice presented with equal prominence, or switching technical settings away from the default. The key point is that all consent must be opt-in consent – there is no such thing as ‘opt-out consent’. Failure to opt out is not consent. You may not rely on silence, inactivity, default settings, pre-ticked boxes or your general terms and conditions, or seek to take advantage of inertia, inattention or default bias in any other way.

      On opt in vs opt out in GDPR.

    1. Although the GDPR doesn’t specifically ban opt-out consent, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) says that opt-out options “are essentially the same as pre-ticked boxes, which are banned”.

      On opt in vs opt out in GDPR.

    1. Somewhere in a cavernous, evaporative cooled datacenter, one of millions of blinking Facebook servers took our credentials, used them to authenticate to our private email account, and tried to pull information about all of our contacts. After clicking Continue, we were dumped into the Facebook home page, email successfully “confirmed,” and our privacy thoroughly violated.
    1. We are disturbed by the idea that search inquiries are systematically monitored and stored by corporations like AOL, Yahoo!, Google, etc. and may even be available to third parties. Because the Web has grown into such a crucial repository of information and our search behaviors profoundly reflect who we are, what we care about, and how we live our lives, there is reason to feel they should be off-limits to arbitrary surveillance. But what can be done?
    1. If the apparatus of total surveillance that we have described here were deliberate, centralized, and explicit, a Big Brother machine toggling between cameras, it would demand revolt, and we could conceive of a life outside the totalitarian microscope.
  8. Oct 2019
    1. Scientists at Imperial College London and Université Catholique de Louvain, in Belgium, reported in the journal Nature Communications that they had devised a computer algorithm that can identify 99.98 percent of Americans from almost any available data set with as few as 15 attributes, such as gender, ZIP code or marital status.

      This goes to show that one should not trust companies and organisations which claim to "anonymise" your data.

    2. Two years ago, when he moved from Boston to London, he had to register with a general practitioner. The doctor’s office gave him a form to sign saying that his medical data would be shared with other hospitals he might go to, and with a system that might distribute his information to universities, private companies and other government departments.The form added that the although the data are anonymized, “there are those who believe a person can be identified through this information.”“That was really scary,” Dr. de Montjoye said. “We are at a point where we know a risk exists and count on people saying they don’t care about privacy. It’s insane.”
    1. ) Blockchain MemoryWe let LL be the blockchain mem-ory space, represented as the hastable L:{0,1}256→{0,1}NL:\{0,1\}^{256}\rightarrow \{0, 1\}^{N}, where N≫N \gg 256 and can store sufficiently-large documents. We assume this memory to be tamperproof under the same adversarial model used in Bitcoin and other blockchains. To intuitively explain why such a trusted data-store can be implemented on any blockchain (including Bitcoin), consider the following simplified, albeit inefficient, implementation: A blockchain is a sequence of timestamped transactions, where each transaction includes a variable number of output addresses (each address is a 160-bit number). LL could then be implemented as follows - the first two outputs in a transaction encode the 256-bit memory address pointer, as well as some auxiliary meta-data. The rest of the outputs construct the serialized document. When looking up L[k]L[k], only the most recent transaction is returned, which allows update and delete operations in addition to inserts.

      This paragraph explains how blockchain hides one's individual identity and privacy, while giving them a secure way of using the funds. In my opinion lot hacker ransomware are done using block-chain technology coins, this and one more paragraph here is really interesting to read about how blockchain helps protect personal data. and i also related this this hacking and corruption or money laundering

    1. Per Bloomberg, which cited an memo from an anonymous Google staffer, employees discovered that the company was creating the new tool as a Chrome browser extension that would be installed on all employees’ systems and used to monitor their activities.

      From the Bloomberg article:

      Earlier this month, employees said they discovered that a team within the company was creating the new tool for the custom Google Chrome browser installed on all workers’ computers and used to search internal systems. The concerns were outlined in a memo written by a Google employee and reviewed by Bloomberg News and by three Google employees who requested anonymity because they aren’t authorized to talk to the press.

  9. Sep 2019
    1. On social media, we are at the mercy of the platform. It crops our images the way it wants to. It puts our posts in the same, uniform grids. We are yet another profile contained in a platform with a million others, pushed around by the changing tides of a company's whims. Algorithms determine where our posts show up in people’s feeds and in what order, how someone swipes through our photos, where we can and can’t post a link. The company decides whether we're in violation of privacy laws for sharing content we created ourselves. It can ban or shut us down without notice or explanation. On social media, we are not in control.

      This is why I love personal web sites. They're your own, you do whatever you want with them, and you control them. Nothing is owned by others and you're completely free to do whatever you want.

      That's not the case with Facebook, Microsoft, Slack, Jira, whatever.

    1. There is already a lot of information Facebook can assume from that simple notification: that you are probably a woman, probably menstruating, possibly trying to have (or trying to avoid having) a baby. Moreover, even though you are asked to agree to their privacy policy, Maya starts sharing data with Facebook before you get to agree to anything. This raises some serious transparency concerns.

      Privacy International are highlighting how period-tracking apps are violating users' privacy.

  10. Aug 2019
    1. Even if you choose not to use Wi-Fi services we make available at MGM Resorts, we may still collect information concerning the precise physical location of your mobile device within and around MGM Resorts for non-marketing purposes. 

      Holy cow

    1. Now, I'd rather pay for a product that sticks around than have my personal data sold to use a free product that may not be around tomorrow. I value my privacy much more today. If you're not paying for the product... you are the product being sold.
  11. Jul 2019
    1. Even if we never see this brain-reading tech in Facebook products (something that would probably cause just a little concern), researchers could use it to improve the lives of people who can’t speak due to paralysis or other issues.
    2. That’s very different from the system Facebook described in 2017: a noninvasive, mass-market cap that lets people type more than 100 words per minute without manual text entry or speech-to-text transcription.
    3. Their work demonstrates a method of quickly “reading” whole words and phrases from the brain — getting Facebook slightly closer to its dream of a noninvasive thought-typing system.
    1. If Bluetooth is ON on your Apple device everyone nearby can understand current status of your device, get info about battery, device name, Wi-Fi status, buffer availability, OS version and even get your mobile phone number
    1. Comparison between web browsers

      This is one of the best resources on web privacy I've ever seen. I warmly recommend it!

    1. Two years ago, when he moved from Boston to London, he had to register with a general practitioner. The doctor’s office gave him a form to sign saying that his medical data would be shared with other hospitals he might go to, and with a system that might distribute his information to universities, private companies and other government departments.The form added that the although the data are anonymized, “there are those who believe a person can be identified through this information.”“That was really scary,” Dr. de Montjoye said. “We are at a point where we know a risk exists and count on people saying they don’t care about privacy. It’s insane.”
    2. Scientists at Imperial College London and Université Catholique de Louvain, in Belgium, reported in the journal Nature Communications that they had devised a computer algorithm that can identify 99.98 percent of Americans from almost any available data set with as few as 15 attributes, such as gender, ZIP code or marital status.

      This goes to show that one should not trust companies and organisations which claim to "anonymise" your data.

  12. Jun 2019
  13. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. snafus, like those of privacy settings

      I'm struck by the choice of "snafu" to describe "privacy settings." I worry describing privacy as a snafu undermines the seriousness with which teachers and students should evaluate a technology's privacy settings when choosing to incorporate the technology into a classroom and other learning environment.

  14. www.joinhoney.com www.joinhoney.com
    1. Honey’s products do not support Do Not Track requests at this time, which means that we collect information about your online activity while you are using Honey’s products in the manner described above.

      So even if you ask us not to track you, we will anyway.

    2. Once you delete your profile, there is no longer any data attributable to you.

      Which means they do not delete all your information.

    3. After you have terminated your use of Honey’s products, we will store your information in an aggregated and anonymised format.

      We keep your info forever, in other words.

    4. as long as is required

      Which is?

    5. That means while you are using the Extension and Honey is saving you money,

      Slickly written. These dudes are good!

    6. While you are using the Extension, this does NOT include any information from your search engine history or from your email.

      Trust us!

  15. May 2019
    1. They’ve learned, and that’s more dangerous than caring, because that means they’re rationally pricing these harms. The day that 20% of consumers put a price tag on privacy, freemium is over and privacy is back.

      Google want you to say yes, not because they're inviting positivity more than ever, but because they want you to purchase things and make them richer. This is the essence of capitalism.

    1. Unsurprisingly living up to its reputation, Facebook refuses to comply with my GDPR Subject Access Requests in an appropriate manner.

      Facebook never has cared about privacy of individuals. This is highly interesting.

    1. Now, how does that mother build an online scrapbook of all the items that were poured into the system?

      The assumptions here are interesting. Does mom have the right to every picture taken at her party? Do the guests have the right to take pictures and post them on the web?

  16. Apr 2019
    1. The report also noted a 27 percent increase in the number of foreigners whose communications were targeted by the NSA during the year. In total, an estimated 164,770 foreign individuals or groups were targeted with search terms used by the NSA to monitor their communications, up from 129,080 on the year prior.
    1. we get some of it by collecting data about your interactions, use and experiences with our products. The data we collect depends on the context of your interactions with Microsoft and the choices that you make, including your privacy settings and the products and features that you use. We also obtain data about you from third parties.
    1. Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Thursday that Motel 6 shared the information of about 80,000 guests in the state from 2015 to 2017. That led to targeted investigations of guests with Latino-sounding names, according to Ferguson. He said many guests faced questioning from ICE, detainment or deportation as a result of the disclosures. It's the second settlement over the company's practice in recent months.

      If you stay at Motel 6, prepare to have your latino-tinged data handed over to the authorities who are looking to harm you permanently.