5 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. Dr. Wachter and other early leaders also worried that patients, used to continuity of care with their primary-care doctors, would not take well to hospitalists. Would patients revolt against the idea of a new doctor seeing them every day?
    2. Some “specialists worried that if hospitalists were more knowledgeable than once-a-month-a-year attendings, and knew more about what was going on, they would be less likely to consult a specialist,” Dr. Goldman explains, adding he and Dr. Wachter thought that would be an unintended consequence of HM. “If there was a reduction in requested consults, that expertise would somehow be lost.”
    3. Perhaps the biggest concerns to hospital medicine in the beginning came from the residents at UCSF. Initially, residents worried—some aloud—that hospitalists would become too controlling and “take away their delegated and graduated autonomy,” Dr. Goldman recalls
  2. Oct 2018
    1. Some anxieties relate to practical issues, timeframes, and possible abuses. Concerns about these are reasonable and certainly need debate: the required technologies may be difficult to achieve, some may elude us indefinitely or turn out to be beyond our grasp. Some may be all too possible, if they fall into the wrong hands.

      As people are creating new technologies for the benefit of other, there are many technology that leads to human destruction. Take for example the creation of nuclear weapons. Once was created to end destruction, but yet has never ended because the lack of trust and compromise. As human continue to create new and advance technology for the world, when is a there a time to stop? Are the people in need of "improvement"? As there is many good things in life, there is always something to contradict it.

  3. Dec 2015